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Full text of "Our College Times"



Jpriuatf Utbrarg 



LEWIS DAY ROSE 



Study to show thyself approved."— Paul 



REFERENCE 
MATERIAL 



FOR 



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in 2011 with funding from 

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v./' 
ox )V^ 




O^'^f'V;. 



;-'tiip. Look, Listen 5 

.V Tlirillini:;' Experience 7 

Tlic Lite of a Newsboy 9 

Puritanism in England 10 

Rlack the Heels of Your Boots 11 

Editorial. 

Fighting Shadows 13 

School Notes 17 

To the Fringed Gentian 19 

The College Lecture Course 20 

K. L. S. News 21 

H'(imerian News 21 

Resolutions of Sympathy 22 

Alumni Notes 23 

Exchanges 24 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 




Black Cat 
Hosiery 



HERTZLER'S 
Department Store 

Your needs supplied at satisfactory 
prices in Dry Goods, Groceries, Ready- 
to-Wear Clotliing for Men and Women 
of all ages. Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oil- 
cloth. Shoes, etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 

CLOTHING 

International Tailoring Co., N. Y. 

American Ladies Tailoring Co.. Chi- 
cago. 
Up-to-Date Samples on Hand. 

HERTZLER BROS. & CO. 

Centre Square El iZabethtOWII , Pa. 



\V. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 



U. S. D^IPOSITORY 

Eiizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits, $164,000 



General Accounts Solicited. Interest Paid on Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent, 





Dl RECTORS 




W. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strickler 


Peter N. Rutt 


F. W. Grotf. 


J. S. Risser 


B. L. Geyer 


E. C. Ginder 


Amos G. Coble 


E. 0. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



PiiilHIIIMIIIIiaillllBlllliaillllBnilWJIiBllllBlllllBmilBlllliaillliBIIIII 

BUCHANAN & YOUNG 

115 & 117 N. Queen St., 
LANCASTER, PENN'A 

The New Season's 
Silks 

ARE READY 

The largest assortment of Silks in 
the City can be found at "The Store 
Famous for Silks." 

BLACK SILKS. 

Black Messaline, in a variety of 
prices and widths. Prices range, 50c., 
59c.. 75c., $1.00, $1.25 to $1.50. 

Black Satin Duchess, with beauti- 
ful finish, very popular at present. 
Fri:e range. 79c. to $1.50. 

Black Taffeta, an excellent quality 
and in all the desirable widths. Price 
ranse, 50c. to $1.50. 

Black Peau de Sole, always popular 
as a dress material, because of its 
beautiful, close-woven surface. Prices, 
59c. to $1.50. 

Black Peau de Cygne, with a beauti- 
ful, lustrous finish. Prices, 75c. to 
$1.50. 

Blar>k Charmeuse, just the thing for 
the present day dresses, because of its 
draping possibilities. These are of 
very excellent quality. Price $1.98. 

Black Creiie de Chine: this popular 
silk is being used at present more than 
ever. Prices, 75c. to $1.50. 

BLACK DRESS GOODS 

An excellent variety from which to 
make your selection. Here you wi 
find all that is new and up-to-date, 
from the cheapest materials at 25c. a 
yard to the finest all-wool materials. 
We are ready to supply your needs for 
the Fall and Winter. 

iiiiiiiiiiiBiii!iiiiniBiiiiiaiiiiiBniiai>ii!Biiiaiii 




Students Will Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



IMPORTANT! STUDENTS I h 

»^t f" W^/^ " <»^^'' I M^/ V * m ^f f M^/ l ^ W ^/^l II t«^/ ^ « I nV U * " *»^/l^ 

DO YOU KNOW THAT 



It is only ccicjse of the kind patronage of our business and 
our profe:Eicnal men in this town and elsewhere, that this maga- 
zine exists. They have indeed shown themselves friends of Our 
College and of "Our College Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to 
buy anything, to consider first those who by their advertising 
have made this magazine possible. 

Vvc have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all 
respects. 

business Manager of "Our College Times." 

READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



First Showing 

OF THE NEW 

Fall Shoes 

Every Style — every wanted 
Leather — every new shape 
— is here, ready for your in- 
spection. Will you stop in 
to see them today ? 

LYNCH & EBY 

"No Shoes Over $3.00" 

24 North Queen St., 
LANCASTER, - PENN'A 



ADVERTISE 



■OUR COLLEGE TIMES' 



(§nv doUpgp ®tmp0 



Elizabbthtown, Pa., Octobek, 191S 



Stop. Look, Listen. 



Harry D. Moyer. 



A\'ho has not seen the familiar sign- 
post — Stop, Look, and Listen — which 
is found at every railroad crossing. 
What does it mean to you ? To some 
it means a caution from danger, but to 
the majority it means nothing more 
than mere trouble and waste of time, 
and for these reasons many people 
utterly ignore these sign-posts. Just 
so, along the pathway of life, there are 
many sign-posts, past which the peo- 
ple rush, because they have no time to 
stop. 

One of the first sign-posts which so 
many of us ignore is that which bids 
us stop long enough to prepare for the 
battles of life. Too many of us are 
guilty of trying to put a "life's struc- 
ture on a day's foundation." There 
are daily hundreds of young men and 
women launched into life without hav- 
ing had sufficient preparation for their 
work. Owing to this, they are inca- 
pable of performing the duties assigned 
to them and before long the cold and 
heartless world will have turned its 
back to them, and will have handed 
their positions to peo])le who are ca- 
pable of filling them. The day of Jack- 
of-all-Trades is past. The world now 
is looking for masters, for men, who 
are trained to do a special work, and 
to do that work well. Our Master has 



given us a splendid example, while 
here on earth. He was in preparation 
for thirty years to do a work, which 
required but three years to complete. 
Is it not worth while to stop, look 
around you and listen to the demands 
which the world is making for others, 
and which will be required of you ? 
Xot taking time for preparation is 
dangerous. 

Stop for a few moments in the daily 
routine to think what you are thinking 
about. Are you thinking such thoughts 
as will tend to ennoble you ? Remem- 
ber that thoughts determine character. 
Someone has said, "Think a mean 
thought today and you will be a mean 
soul tomorrow." Thoughts have done 
a great deal. Was it not thought that 
sent and is sending the criminals to the 
work-house daily, that caused Lincoln 
Garfield, and IMcKinley to fill martyr's 
graves, and that caused all of our lit- 
erature to come into existence ? All 
these things are the result of thinking. 
Some thinking is in the wrong direc- 
tion, therefore it is imperative that we 
stop along life's pathway to analyze 
our thoughts. 

Let us stop; lay aside our work, and 
listen to the appeal which is put forth 
by suffering humanitj'. Are we too 
busy to lift the fallen and help the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



weak ? A kind word, spoken at the 
proper time and place, may do more 
good than a dozen sermons, and yet 
we are so slow to give them. We are 
drawn along by the tide of humanity, 
and in our eagerness for honor, wealth, 
and fame, we are not willing to stop to 
help the one who has lost his honor in 
the gutter, to help the one who is dis- 
couraged, and give encouragement to 
the one who is weak. May we realize 
that, since we are our brother's keeper, 
it is our highest duty to lake time to 
lend him aid. 

May we leave this din of the hurry- 
ing and the rushing crowd, stop in 
some (|uiet place, and cumnninc with 



our God. This is one of the things 
which we find that humanity is too 
busy to do. We cannot stop the fac- 
tories and the mills but a few hours to 
meditate upon the sublime, and to 
speak with Him face to face. We are 
too busy to go to Him with our sor- 
rows and our cares. Let us stop, look 
over what he has done for us, and lis- 
ten to his pleading. He is interested 
in us and eager that we have rest after 
our race on earth is over. 

.As life's pathway draws to a close, 
may we be able to look back over a life 
of service for others, and by that show 
to humanity that it pays to stop, look, 
and listen. 



A Thril 



Naomi Longenecker. 



When May Xorlon had been at Ci>l- 
Ic^c a year and a lialf she showed 
sii^ns lit" ill health. This alarmed her 
guardian and physician as she was the 
only one left of a family of eight who 
died of consumption. So the physician 
advised her to make a change in order 
to regain her strength. After the mat- 
ter was discussed by all concerned, it 
was decided that she should go to her 
uncle's home in South Dakota. Al- 
though Max- was reluctant to leave her 
work and her friends in the East, yet 
she was eager to go to her uncle's 
home, for he lived on a large ranch, 
and had several children whom May 
was A-ery eager to see. 

One fine morning in March, May 
started with a friend for the West. 
This friend was going to accompany 
lier most of the way, and so she had to 
travel only several miles alone. Then 
she expected her uncle to meet her at 
the station. TTaving made all previous 
arrangements. May felt quite at ease 
when she stepped off the train and ex- 
pected to find her uncle at the station 
which was nothing more than a wait- 
ing room. She looked all about her in 
search of her uncle but he was not 
there. Thinking that he was late she 
waited patiently for two hours. Then 
she began to feel very lonely and help- 
less in this strange country. Another 
hour passed, and as she could control 
her feelings no longer she began to cry. 
She had just given herself up to her 
misery when she heard galloping hoofs 
in the distance. Her heart leaped in 



e.\]jeclancy. She turned to see them, 
but as they came nearer they were two 
Indians on horseback. In a moment 
more they had galloped by her. She 
shuddered as she thought of her posi- 
tion, and broke into tears anew. 

Again she heard horses coming, but 
this time in the opposite direction. As 
they passed May saw that they were 
the same men. They turned as they 
passed and looked at her sharply. She 
felt greatly relieved wlien they were 
out of sight. 

Suddenly she heard behind her a 
rough voice demanding her mone}'. 
She could scarcely understand what 
the man wanted as his English was 
very poor, yet she understood that he 
wanted all the property she had with 
her. She was so frightened that she 
.gave up what she had without any re- 
sistance. The two men she had seen 
galloping by now came up and took 
her things and rode away. 

About half an hour later the same 
men who had taken her things came 
back. They took her this time, and 
placed her on one of the horses and 
away they went for a number of miles. 
May could think of little more than 
keeping on the horse. 

Almost paralyzed with fear May was 
helped off the horse at an old shanty 
around which were several tents, 
brushes, several trees, and a number 
of small children. Some Indian wo- 
men were preparing some food on a 
blazing fire. This place was the home 
of the men who had brought her. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



May was taken into a room in the 
small house, and locked into it. She 
was given some food and left alone. 
After what seemed like da^vs to May 
everything about the place became 
quiet and May fell asleep in spite of her 
efforts to keep awake. 

The next morning May realized why 
she had been brought there, for all the 
money which she had concealed in her 
clothing was gone besides all the 
trinkets she wore. All that day ]\Iay 
spent in the same room which had but 
one window into which the children 
peeped from time to time, and close to 
which May did not venture. 

That evening May heard a number of 
voices outside. Evidently there were 
more men. They were drinking, and 
May thought they were talking about 
her. After a while their merriment 
stopped, and wondering whether they 
had gone or whether they were still 
there she peeped through the window, 
near which she did not go while they 
were outside. She saw that they were 
all there, but according to their be- 
havior she concluded that they must 
be intoxicated, so she tried the door 
which was still locked. Her only 
way of escape was the window. She 
tried to open it, but did not succeed 
until she had removed several nails. 

She crept softly through it, and as 



the night had come on she was not 
seen by the men who were not alto- 
gether sleeping. She crept softly by 
the empty tents and then began to run. 
Her strength seemed to come back as 
she was again free, and she almost flew 
across the ground, her heart throbbing 
with excitement and the thought of 
freedom. 

\\'hen she had gone on for some dis- 
tance she heard horses not far distant. 
She crept near some brush until they 
had passed, and in the dim moonlight 
she saw the Indian men who had taken 
her to their home. She waitd a long 
time in her hiding place until they went 
back and then she continued on her 
way. 

It was bright day light when May 
reached a farm-house, and asked for 
protection and shelter, which was giv- 
en her, and which she very much need- 
ed for she had walked all night. The 
people at the farm not only cared for 
her needs physically, but helped her by 
finding her uncle who lived thirty miles 
distant aufl who had been robbed on 
the same evening by the Indians who 
captured I\Iay. 

May"s health came back very slowly 
but surely, and now is a noted elocu- 
tionist. She often relates the thrilling 
experience to the childrden when they 
ask for a .story. 



The Life of a Newsboy. 



Sara C. Shisler. 



W'hi) in the city needs one's sympa- 
thy and attention more than the large 
number of newsboys, that are constant- 
ly being exposed to all kinds of vice ? 

Let us take one and consider first 
the condition of his home. It is in the 
slums where the surroundings are very 
degrading. \'ice surrounds him on all 
sides, cursing is practiced by almost 
every one and the filthy streets take 
the place of the beauties of Nature 
that are denied. Father loves drink 
more than his family and mother has 
so many (ither duties that the older 
children must care for themselves. Con- 
sequently he is neglected and made to 
feel as if this world was without love. 

Likewise the pleasures of child life 
are not knmvn to him. There is no 
time for play or amusement. This 
makes him selfish, greedy and disagree- 
able, as he does not learn to adjust him- 
self to the rights of others. Then, too, 
the newsboy must be on duty early in 
the morning. This robs him of some 
sleep and therefore prevents proper de- 
velopment. 

Furthermore, the many places of vice 
with doors wide open, not only attract 
his attention, but it is also his duty to 
deliver papers there. In this way he 
is led from innocent boyhood, not to 
what he chooses to be, but to that 
which others influence him to become. 
.■\1I kinds of schemes for thefts are dis- 
cussed in his presence. These things 
— drunkenness, gambling, and cursing, 
finally liecome so natural to his senses 
tKat his eyes and ears are no longer 



open to anything helpful or uplifting. 
In like manner his language is very 
rough. 

His only friends are other newsboys, 
with whom quarrels are frequent. As 
a result he feels despised. What else 
can we expect ? To the boy who hears 
no kind words but in return sees others 
having friends, good clothes, and every- 
thing they need, life seems hardly 
worth living. , 

It is not long until he becomes 
ashamed to carry papers. Since he is 
not qualified for a paying position and 
even does not know how to find work, 
he begins idly to stand at the street 
corners. The little money he had, is 
spent. Now is the time to do some- 
thing in order to keep alive. ]\Iany 
diff^erent plans may pass through his 
mind, and, as a result, the decision will 
be some theft. If he fares without dis- 
covery the second crime will be com- 
mitted. His taste for drink has, in fact 
become so great that nothing is too 
bad, if a little money can be obtained. 
Thus, going through a jail or a peni- 
tentiary, we may see the criminal, who 
only a few years before had left home 
innocent. 

These conditions have smothered his' 
spiritual life, which he unconsciously 
possessed. Therefore, his moral and 
spiritual advancement depend upon one 
chance, that somebody should assist 
him. Had the privileges of attending 
church and Sunday School not been 
denied to him. he would not have fallen 
so low. Who knows how often he was 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



eager to enter a church, perhaps only 
for curiosity ? However, his personal 
appearance was a hindrance. 

Nevertheless, if someone wounld 
show enough interest to give a kind 
word it miffht be a balm to his lonely. 



boyish heart. In addition to this, the 
fact that "somebody cares" would spur 
him on to usefulness. Lastly, a great 
change might occur, all because "some- 
body really cared" to the extent that 
he realized it. 



Puritanism in England. 



John G. Kuhns. 



If you should turn back the pages of 
history in England to the year 1682, 
which marked the beginning of Puritan 
power, you would find England in- 
volved in a civil war. This war was 
caused by the tyranny of King Charles 
I of England, who firmly believed in 
the divine right of kings. The party 
that favored Charles in his war was 
called the Royalist Party, and the 
party that upheld the rights of the 
people was called the Puritan Party 
because it was almost wholly com- 
posed of Puritans, — men who believed 
in worshiping God in the way their 
Bible and conscience should dictate. 

.Vfter the war had continued about 
three years there came into promin- 
ence on the Puritan side a man around 
whom all that pertains to Puritanism 
in England seems to cluster. He was 
to the English Civil War what Wash- 
ington was to the .American Revolu- 
tion. -As an officer in the army, be- 
fore he became commander-in-chief, he 
showed his Puritan zeal in having his 
regiment composed of religious men, 
among whom the vices of the camp, 
such as drinking, gambling and swear- 
ing were unkudwn. It was through 
the efforts of these men and their com- 



petent commander that the civil war 
was brought to a close with the Puri- 
tan party victorious. This noted man 
was Oliver Cromwell. 

After those members of the House 
of Parliament, who were in favor of 
the King, had been expelled, a trial of 
the King took jjlace which resulted in 
his sentence and execution. A Com- 
monwealth was now established by the 
Puritans with a new form of govern- 
ment. This system was little better 
than the tyrannical rule of Charles I. 
Cromwell saw the dissatisfaction of the 
people to this new regime and he quick- 
ly brought about its termination. He 
then caused another form of govern- 
ment to be instituted and caused a con- 
stitution to be written under which he 
became "Lord Protector of the Com- 
monwealth of England, Scotland, and 
Ireland" for life. 

.•\s Protector his authority was al- 
most unlimited, for he had the power 
of the army behind him. In this man- 
ner Cromwell carried on the govern- 
ment for five years. His aim was to 
develop England into a great nation, 
and make her worthy of such great- 
ness. 

Under tiie inspiration of this Puritan 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



spirit two of the world's greatest liter- 
ary works were produced,— Milton's 
"Paradise Lost" and "Paradise Re- 
tjained. and John Banyan's wonder- 
ful alle^'ory "Pilgrim's Progress." All 
that was true and noble in the Puritan 
character can be found in these great 
works. 
Altlmugh the Puritan form of govern- 
ment was a failure in England, it had a 
marked effect upon the character of a 



certain class of people who later played 
a great part in the founding of the 
American nation. They were sober, 
persevering, deeply religious men and 
were well equipped to overcome the 
hardships which helped them. It was 
among these Puritans that the Revolu- 
tionary War began and to them the 
highest credit is due for their aid in 
the founding of our great nation. 



Black the Heels of Your Boots. 



Robert J. Ziegler. 

Perhaps many people have heard the 



old proverb. "Black the heels of your 
boots." Have you ever stopped to 
think of the signifigance of the 
words ? Did you ever meet a man on 
the street or perhaps in church whose 
shoes were \ery shining and brilliant 
over the toes, but the heels of which 
were rather gray ? What did you 
think of him ? Is he the kind of man 
that you would choose for a responsi- 
ble position in your business ? Or 
would you rather pass him by and se- 
lect some one whose shoes were entire- 
ly blacked ? Why would you make 
the distinction ? Ah! you would con- 
clude that the man, whose heels were 
not blacked, to be a person who would 
not be thorough and accurate in his 
work. And so we find a lesson hidden 
under the surface of these words. Here 
is given to us a lesson of thoroughness. 
O, that we might be more thorough in 
our walks in life ! O, that we might see 
the importance of doing our duty, and 
doing it well. So many of us neglect 
the iittle things in life.' We forget to 
clean out the corners, thinking perhaps 
that they will not be seen. If we only 
could see things as Longfellow ex- 
presses them in his little poem, "The 
Builders :" 



For the structure that we raise 
Time is with materials filled. 

Our to-days and yesterdays 

Are the blocks with which we build. 

Truly shape and fashion these. 

Leave no pawning gap between. 
Think not, because no man sees. 

Such things will remain unseen. 

The world stands in need of thor- 
ough tradesmen, thorough business 
men, thorough teachers, and above all 
thorough Christians. The world is 
looking for men in the different path- 
ways of labor, who are thoroughly 
trained in that particular line. These 
men should also be thoroughly system- 
atic in the execution of their work 
The carpenter must know accurately 
how to go about his work ; the machin- 
ist must know his business ; the busi- 
ness man must be thorough in all the 
details of his work; the bookkeeper 
must be accurate ; and the stenograph- 
er must have everything complete and 
entire. At the head of all these there 
must be some one to manage, and how 
is that person to know whether or not 
the persons under him are properly 
performing their duties, if he himself 
has not passed through the lesson of 
thoroughness. Moreover, the teachers 
must be faithful to their trust and do 
their work thoroughlv in order to set a 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



good example for their pupils, and to 
be able to train the children to be the 
same. If the younger generation is not 
taught to be thorough where will our 
nation end ? We would soon be in a 
state of utter disorder and confusion. 
Last of all the world needs thorough 
Christians to help it on to a purer and 
a nobler plane of life. 

The next question is: How or where 
shall we begin to do our work thor- 
oughly ? This lesson should be taught 
the child in early life, but should any- 
one be so unfortunate as not to have 
had such a training, the time to begin 
is now. There is such a good oppor- 
tunity for cultivating the virtue, — I 
shall call it a virtue because I believe 
it is one,— of thoroughness right in 
our school life. Let us start by having 
our lessons well prepared. Let u? have 
our lessons so well prepared that we 
can answer any question that the 
teacher may ask. And then not only 
in our academic work should we b« 
thorough, but in the social life as well. 
Let us be thorough gentlemen and 
ladies, and thorough in our daily ex- 
ercise. It is that a young man or 
young woman forms during his school 
days that clings to him in later life. If 
we as individuals form the habit of be- 
ing thorough, we shall never in our 
later life regret it. 

Finally let us be thorough in respect 
to our Christian life. We should do 
with our might what our hands find to 
do. The world has already too many 
people who are waiting for a big op- 
])ortunity to do something for Christ. 
We find opportunities every day to do 
a little service for Chri.st. You all 
know the naral)le of the talents. You 
all know the destiny of the man who 
hid his talent in the ground. He was 
a man who did not black the heels of 
his boots. He was a man who cared 



not for the corners, and so he was cast 
into outer darkness. If we all should 
try to be thorough Christians what an 
evangelization of the world there 
would be. Surely, men "\\'ould see 
our good works and glorify our Father 
which is in Heaven." 

Attention Householders. 

Joseph Baldwin, State Fire Marshall. 

Do you ever think ? If not, com- 
mence now and keep it up. The tune 
for starting fires is now on and all 
chiiiineys and flues should be thorough- 
ly cleaned. Act and get your neigh- 
bors to do the same. Its money in 
your pocket. 

Your insurance rates are high, why? 
Because you do nothing towards pre- 
vention of fire waste. You throw rub- 
bish about and forget it until a fire 
starts, then you sa}', I was going to 
clean up, but, you didn't, and the loss 
is yours and your neighbors. Perhaps 
a life or so is lost through your care- 
lessness ; stop that carelessness now. 
Clean up and keep clean. 

Do you know it cost you S3.00 per 
year for yourself, wife and each of your 
children to pay the fire losses in the 
United States. Figure it out and see 
if you would not rather pay as Europe 
does only 33 cents per capita. That's 
saving money. Help to reduce it in 
this country by keeping your building 
in good repair and free from all waste 
matter that might cause fires. See 
that your neighbors do the same. 

If Europe burned oroperty as the 
United States burns it there would be 
several Nations sold by auction to the 
highest bidder. 

Forgetting your danger from fires 
won't stop a blaze from starting. Its 
U]) to you to see there is nothing about 
to start fires. Don't think because 
you never had a fire that you won't. 
To be sure, use care to prevent one. 

Politics may effect business but it 
won't cut into the fire loss. You have 
ty. Will you ? Do it now. Don't 
wait until to-morrow. Clean up and 
keep at it. 




EDITORIAL BOARD 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER. Editor-in-Chief 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 



.School Notes 



Mary G. Hershey. . . | 
Orville Z. Becker. . ( 

Nora L. Reber Homerlan News 

Naomi Longenecker K. L. S. News 



J. D. Reber Alumni Notes 

Isaac J. Kreider Excaanges 

J. H. Gingrich Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider Art Editor 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year by Elizabethtowa 

College. 
This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as net to break their files^ 

and arrearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration^ 
Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates: — Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for $2.00. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at tbe Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



Fighting Shadows. 

'IIt'm. whn are acquainted with the 
nr.minL;- > I :i lorr>ipnti\-e say that tiie 
niniinlii,dit nights are the must trying' 
■ 11! ;:n engineer. .A terrilile feehng 
must come upon ai; fugineer on a dark 
night when the rnvs trom the headliglit 
of his engine disclose to his view an ob- 
s' ruction on the t ack not more than 
a few hundred yards ahead of him. but 
Imw nerve-racking must the torture be 
on a moonlight night with hundreds 



nf apparent obstructions haunting him 
at every glance from his cab. Only 
an experienced engineer fully knows 
what it means to fight the shadows cast 
by the moonlight on several hundred 
miles of track. How much anxiety 
could be removed if the shadows were 
absent and the light from the engine 
allcnved to dispel the darkness ! For, 
then, only real obstructions would ap- 
pear on the track and the engineer's 
task be changed from fighting shadows 
to watching for real ol)jects. 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Shadows on a moonlight night cause 
annoyance not only to engineers but 
also to the ignorant and superstitious. 
Have you ever heard of a rustic swain 
who saw a graveyard peopled with 
white-robed figures on a frosty moon- 
light night as he returned from paying 
a visit to his lady love ? How great 
his anxiety ! How his limbs trembled 
and his hair stood on end ! He was in 
a frightful struggle ; he was just on the 
verge of uttering his SA'an song, when 
away his legs carried him. Such has 
been the experience of many an ignor- 
ant person whose active imagination 
has constructed spectral forms. Many 
a father, too. has told his family of the 
the ghosts that inhabit certain houses 
of the village, and how they would 
grapple with anyone entering the 
dwelling before the cock announced 
the approaching day. Poor, ignorant 
people struggling in earnest with vis- 
ionary obstacles, — fighting shadows. 

Not only does the engineer fight 
shadows on his run and the rustic lover 
and the ignorant villager tell harrowing 
experiences with spectral shadows, but 
even the college student stands aghast 
sometimes at shadows that seem like 
indefatigable giants. For example, 
there is the ghoulish ])hantom which 
he calls Xo Time; there is the ghost- 
like Goliath nanvd Social Prestige; 
there is the emaciated .spectral Ama- 
zonian called Expense; and there is the 
wierd Herculean apparition which he 
terms i'ailure. These haunting spirits 
have kept many a man from succeeding 
in his chostn vocation in life. 

The first i)hantom. No Time, blocks 
the way for the student in many of the 
organizations in which he should show 
the best of interest. Too many stu- 
dents seem to think that thcv do not 



have time to take an active part in the 
Literary Societies of the institution 
they are attending. No student can 
afiford to be in school a year or more 
without participating in the work of a 
literary society. The knowledge of 
parliamentary rules as gained in so- 
ciety work alone is worth the presence 
of a student at every mee'ing. Be- 
sides, the training in public speaking, 
the ]:)re])aratinn required for numbers 
on the jrograms, and the development 
of social.'ility at its meetings, fully re- 
pay an hour or two spent in society 
once a week. Neither can a student se- 
cure the best that a college has to oft'er 
him if lie does not find time to attend 
some of its religious organizations. Be- 
cause of the great lack of this kind of 
teaching in our colleges and universi- 
ties of todax- the student must take 
s])ecial pains to enter the Mission 
Study class and be an active Christian 
in the Weekly Prayer Meeting. It 
pays to be a Christian ; hence we must 
take time to develo-) our Christian 
graces. 

Then, too, there is the social nature 
that needs development. The school 
that does not ])rovide for this will fail 
fully to develop its students. Each 
student should be present at the so- 
cials given during the course of the 
school year, and try to develop that 
personality which spells success in the 
world. We can never succeed in life 
unless we are sociable; consequently, 
if we would succeed we must take 
time for the development of that part 
of our nature. Every student should 
be a member of one of the Athletic As- 
.sociations. We do not advocate a 
sacrifice of time for the training of ath- 
letes. I)ut we do advockte sufficient par- 
ticipation in some humane sixorts that 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



IS 



will develop the physical body 'in pro- 
portion to, and in accordance with, the 
true development of the mind and the 
soul. We contend for genuine physi- 
cal development and not for athletics; 
for the harmonious development of all 
the powers of the student, and not for 
the extraordinary development of the 
physical body to the neglect of the bet- 
ter natures. In short, we contend for 
men of good brain with developed 
brawn and not for men of highly de- 
veloped brawn with little brain. 

"nut." says the student, "I have no 
time to take part in these organiza- 
tions." N'-) student has time to get 
the best out of his college course if he 
does not learn to economize time. 
Kvery student has time for engaging 
in this work ; if he does not, the man- 
agement is at fault. No Time is your 
haunting ghost. Say no more that you 
have no time for work in the literary 
society, for the work is essential to 
your success; that you can not find 
time for religious meetings, for your 
soul will sh'ivel without it; that you 
are too busy to attend socials, for the 
world desires affable men and women ; 
and that you can not participate, in in- 
nocent recreation, for a sound mind is 
more often found in a sound body. 
Resolve no longer to be baffled by this 
ghoulish phantom. No Time : strike 
him to the ground with one fell stroke. 
— no, you need not strike, for resolu- 
tion on your part to economize time 
will reveal to you that you have been 
fi.ghting shadows. 

In the path of some students there 
stands another ghost-like Goliath, So- 
cial Prestige. If this spectre has 
haunted you in your vision of success, 
be not dismayed. A little pebble in 
the sling of honor will bring him to the 



earth with a mighty thud. High may 
be his pretensions, proud his name, yet 
in spite of his title and power he is 
made of the same substance as dreams. 
Social prestige is a poor defence in 
times of war ; arrows of honor will 
pierce his corselet, and swords of hon- 
esty will cleave asunder his helmet. 

The man who puts his sole trust in 
social prestige will not be a winner in 
the end. He is like the fisherman from 
the city who comes to the country to 
fish. He brings with him an excellent 
steel rod. fitted with a cork handle, a 
nickel-plated reel, and a silk line. In 
a neat case he carries all kinds of arti- 
ficial bait. He fishes under a wide- 
spreading elm all day and catches not 
a fish. Down the stream some dis- 
tance is a boy with a roughly trimmed 
green sapling to which is attached a 
knotted cotton line with a bent pin at 
the end for a hook. .An empty can by 
his side contains a wriggling mass of 
earth worms. He fishes a while and 
.gets a mess of fish. What a difference! 
The one relied on his equipment ; the 
other on his knowledge of fish and how 
to catch them: the one had sport; the 
other got fish. The former had the 
prestige of being an ardent follower 
of Izaak Walton ; the latter was an ex- 
pert fisherman. The prestige of the 
fisherman was of little account when it 
came to catching fish. Integrity and 
true knowledge alv\ays bring results. 
Rely upon yourself and the phantom 
giant. Social Prestige, will take to his 
heels. Do not fight this shadow any 
longer. 

But, behold, what female warrior is 
this ? This is the emaciated Amazon- 
ian, Expense. She is indeed very for- 
midable in the eyes of many students. 
The expense incurred in taking a col- 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TLMES 



lege course may seem gigantic in its 
proportions. But money used in se- 
curing an education should not be re- 
garded by any man as money spent but 
as money invested in the bank of self- 
improvement. It is a paying invest- 
ment because of the increased enjoy- 
ment it gives its possessor, and the 
greater capacity it gives to do good in 
the world. Without these acquire- 
ments life can not be fully appreciated 
and the design of our Creator fully re- 
alized in us. In short, no one can truly 
afford such niggardly poverty when it 
is in his power to possess the sublime 
and the true. 

In the course of a four years' course 
the student is also offered the best 
lectures at a remarkably low price. 
But this phantom then tries to keep 
the student from this feast by magni- 
fying the price of the season ticket to 
an extraordinary mental aberration of 
the real price. Have enough courage 
and enterjirise to make the purchase 
and this Amazonian spectre, though 
well accoutred, will disappear. While 
you are at the Pierian spring drink 
deep and receive inspiration that will 
buoy you over the sea of life. De- 
posit enough in the bank of self-im- 
provement to insure a sufficient income 
of power for life's duties. Plan cau- 
tiously and this haunting spirit will 
flee as the shades of night flee the rays 
of the approaching day. 

Another shadow fought by so many 
students is the Herculean a])parition. 
Failure. The sight of this gloomy 
spirit has disheartened many to the ex- 
tent that they were "down and out." 
All this was unnecessary, even though 
it may have required some effort to 
avoid it. There are those who have 
failed in various branches. A "flunk" 
does not mean the failure of a student 
no more than the loss of a battle or 
two means the loss of the war. A 



"flunk" is a blessing in disguise to 
many students : only, so few see the 
blessing. Many a student has passed 
branches in which he had better 
"flunked." For the world wV.\ find 
you out sometime if a certain branch 
has not made a deeper impression upon 
you than the pressure of \our thumb 
upon adamant. It may seem hard to 
retrace a rocky path, but let it ever be 
remembered that we do not become 
expert Alpine mountaineers by grovel- 
ing among the ant hills of the valley. 
To overcome obstacles is to build a 
road to success. What may seem to 
be a Herculean monster will disappear 
when you once strike your pick into 
the rocks that obstruct your passage. 
As the opposing stones may be used 
for stepping stones, sj your "flunks" 
may be employed to a fuller appreci- 
ation of the subject and thus to a suc- 
cessful career. 

Then, too. we so often seem to fail 
to reach our ideals. Our very failure 
in this means success if progress is evi- 
dent in the life of the individual. There 
is no real contentment in this life; no 
real haven of rest here below. Conse- 
quently, life is a continuous striving 
after that which is not yet attained. 
As we grow in j'ears of experience our 
, ideals should expand and be loftier ; 
<iur purposes grander: and our deeds 
nobler. This is living. Will we then 
stand affrighted at the Herculean ap- 
parition. Failure ? Strike lor your 
honor's sake : do not be disheartened : 
pursue the aim of your life with un- 
faltering zeal. .After all. failure is but 
a phantom haunting the inner recesses 
of the soul. 

r>e men ; be noble, daring, honest 
men. Uphold justice, mercy, and love, 
and you will have no haunting ghosts 
to block your path to success. Fight 
no more shadows, life is too precious. 




s 


















t 



L 



U 



Tennis courts busy. 
Room 4 niiiurns the loss of the, 
Misses Sheaft'er. ' 

Tlie enroUment for the Fall Term is 
very encouraging. Prospects are bright 
for a number more. 

Miss Laura Landis seems to have an 
acquaintance of unusual appearance, for 
she has been heard to speak of a gentle- 
man with tall hair. 

Many of the rooms which heretofore 
looked somewhat cold and dreary have 
now been transformed into very home- 
like and cheery quarters. This fall has 
witnessed an unusual incoming of fur- 
niture on College Hill, which gives the 
rooms an inviting atmosphere. 

The first l^right morning in Septem- 
l5er marked the opening of another 
■school year for Elizabethtown College. 
T3y noon man}- former students and 
teachers had returned and not a few 
new faces were welcomed among our 
lumiber. The enjoyable social in the 
evening seemed to indicate that every 
body had already caught the spirit 
characteristic of the life on College 
Hill. 



On October 4, Prof. Harley gave our 
annual talk on "Table Etiquette." 

On September 25 Prof. Ober gave an 
interesting as well as a very instruc- 
tive Chapel Talk on "Exercise." 

The first number of the lecture 
course will be given October 22, by 
Dr. John Merritte Driver, formerly pas- 
tor of the People's Church in Chicago. 
His subject will be "America Facing 
the Far East." 

Heretofore we have always thought 
that butterflies went after roses, but 
recently the reverse was seen to take 
place : Rose went after a butterfly. 

Our good friend John M. Miller of 
Lititz with his big heart brought in his 
machine a number of Lititzites who 
attended the session of the Keystone 
Literary Society. Come again. We 
are always glad to see you. 

Prof. J. G. Meyer paid a visit to the 
Pine Grove congregation a few weeks 
ago in the interest of Sunday School 
work. He brings with him greetings 
from a number of former students in 
that vicinity and reports a pleasant 
trip. 

Situatetl on the corner of Orange 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and iMount Joy streets is now found a 
cozy bungalow, the very expression of 
Professor Schlosser's constructive ge- 
nius. The exterior has an inviting air 
about it, from which one can not turn 
away. The old-fashioned hospitable 
fireside is an attraction to all, and the 
quaint bench beside it cannot be resist- 
ed. Every nook and corner about the 
little home is expressive of comfort and 
good cheer and gives to each one, who 
has had the pleasure of making a call, 
a feeling of satisfaction not soon to be 
forgotten. 

The first Basket Ball game of the 
season was played on Friday evening 
between the Day and the Boarding 
Students and resulted in a defeat of the 
Day Students by the score i8 to 14. 
Boarding Day 

Kreider Guard Martin 

Hershey Guard Reber 

"\Mse Center Geyer 

Brandt Farward Herr 

Becker Forward Rose 

Some very interesting games of base 
ball have also been played this fall. 

Miss Leah ]\r. Sheaffer. '07. was a 
very welcome visitor on College Hill 
last week. \\'hile here she gave an in- 
teresting as well as helpful talk to the 
Berean Bible Class and other students 
and friends of the College. Miss Sheaf- 
fer had been connected with the Col- 
lege in the Music Department for the 
past seven years, and is succeeded as 
piano teacher by Miss Elizabeth Miller 
of Newville, Cumberland County. Miss 
Miller is a graduate of Irving College, 
and conies well rccomnuMidcd. 



Mr. Xyc in l.atin 
ill VMU decline hlia 
Mr. .Mover, in 



■Mr. Mover. 



"Filia. filias, filiant, filiamus, filiatus, 
filiant. I daughter, you daughter, he 
haughter." When Mr. Moyer finished 
he looked very much mystified when 
he saw the entire class laughing. 

If you ever want to make many pan- 
cakes and your batter is small in quan- 
tity, go to Mr. Kreider for directions. 
He either has some peculiar recipe, or 
else he performs some charm in mak- 
ing them. For. according to his words, 
he makes an unusually small amount 
of batter. 

Mr. Rose, in the dining room : "Say, 
Miss Miller, why is it that the better 
you learn to know a person, the more 
you like them?" 

Can anyone give Mr. Rose this in- 
formation ? 

Fresh garden vegetables, such as 
cabbage, potatoes, beets, tomatoes, 
sweet com, and celery are supplied for 
the dinin,g room from the College farm. 
The College boarders have this fall ap- 
preciated the luscious grapes from the 
College grape vines. The truck patch 
■s under the management of the Agri- 
cultural Department of the School. The 
aim of the department is to make it 
profitable by raisin,g the needed vege- 
tables in connection with giving in- 
struction and conducting experiments 
along agricultural lines. .A large mod- 
ern poultry house is being erected on 
the College grounds. This will be the 
means of furnishing an occasional 
chicken dinner. It is a very simple 
structure and is built in accordance 

Miss Myer read an excellent paper 
at the Sunday School Convention in 
Elizabethtown, her subject being 
"Home Visitation." Many were the 
words of praise which it received. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the last 
- you'll 



.•av. 



Mr. Ziegler: "Don't take 
piece of pic, Prof. Harley, o 
surely be an old maid." 

Prof. Ilarley: 'T)!!, well, 
tlie sweetest thiny^s made any 

Many of the students attended the 
Love Feast in the Elizabethtown 
church. Sunday. ( )ct(5ber 12. 

The work of the .-\rt Department has 
started off this year with enthusiasm. 
A greater interest is being shown. A 
peep into the studio would Cl-^n^-ince 
you that the work already accom- 
plished looks promising. 

Unite a bit of consternation was 
caused in the girls' hall when Miss 
Elizabeth R. Miller made the startling 
assertion that "a live owl flew into 
Miss Stauffer's room." Upon investi- 
gation the owl was found perched on 
the wardrobe looking very contented. 
But alas ! Mr. Owl's visit proved very 
unfortunate for he met death at the 
hands of ijur Zoolog}- teacher. Prof. 
•01)er. 

A ver_\- singular thing occurred one 
-morning this week when Miss Landis. 
the art teacher, was going to Memorial 
Hall. She was carrying a lamp and 
was loc-iking hither and thither as 
though in quest of something. She 
met Mr. Xye who, discovering her 
wandering look, kindly asked whether 
she \\-a> looking for an honest man. 

Miss Dohner who has been a^ttending 
college for a few \ears left on Monday 
to enter training in the Lancaster Gen- 
eral liospital. Our College Times ex- 
tends its best wishes for her welfare 
and success. 



he State Bulletin of 



with the plans of 
Poultry Raising. 

Miss Elsie Mentzer of Juniata Col- 
lege, spent several days on College 
Hill as the guest of Miss Elsie Stayer. 

"I ha\-en't enjoyed myself so much 
since I was a little fellow in Greece." 
Such were Mr. Capetanios's comments 
on the outing, and everyone agreed 
with him, for the outing was indeed 
an ideal one. 

Professor in Literature : "\Miat did 
Milton do during the early part of the 
reign of Charles H ?" 

Mr. Graham : "His friends put him 
under the cover." 

To the Fringed Gentian. 
Thou blossom bright with autumn dew, 
And colored with heaven's own blue, 
That openest when the quiet light 
Succeeds the keen and frosty night,— 
Thou comest not when violets lean 
O'er wandering brooks and springs un- 
seen, 
Or columbines, in purple dresses. 
Xod o'er the ground-bird's hidden nest. 
Thou waitest late and com'st alone, 
When woods are bare and birds are 

flown, 
And frosts and shortening days por- 
tend 
The aged year is near his end. 
Then doth thy sweet and quiet eye 
Look through its fringes to the sky, 
Blue — blue — as if that sky let fall , 
.\ flower from its cerulean wall. 
I would that thus, when I shall see 
The hour of death draw near to me, 
Hope, blossoming within my heart, 
May look to heaven as I depart. 

\Vm. Cullen Bryant. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The College Lecture Course. 

The Library Committee has as usual 
provided for a course of lectures and 
entertainments for the students and 
friends of the College throug-hout the 
present school year. The lecturers, 
the readers, and the musicians repre- 
sent a number of states and cover a 
wide range of subjects, and we think 
that every loyal student and friend of 
the school should avail himself of 
an opportunity of getting inspiration 
from those of rich experience. 

The first number of this course will 
be given by Dr. John Merritte Driver 
who hails from Chicago. Dr. Driver 
has traveled through many parts of 
Europe, thus coming in touch with the 
greatest men of that continent and we 
believe he will have something for his 
audience. If you fvant someone to 
show you how much good and beauty 
there is in life, come to hear l^r. Driver 
lecture on "America Facing the Far 
East." on October 22, 1913. 

On November 6, 1913, in the Market 
House, Edward P>axter Perry, the blind 
musician, will render a piano lecture 
recital. His subject will be "Media- 
eval Legends.'" Those of you who ap- 
preciate music and have heard Mr. Per- 
ry before, — for this is the third time he 
comes to Flizaliethtown, — can not fail 
to hear this remarkable man. La\ing 
claim to no s])ecial favor on account of 
his blindness, he stands on his intrin- 
sic merits alone as an artist of the high- 
est order. 

Dr. r.yron C. Piatt will be with us 
the third time on January 24, 1914. lie 
is well styled the "Prophet of a New 
Era." 1 lis subject is "When We Dead 
.\\\ake." This number happens to 
come at the close of our Special Bil)le 



Term and we know Dr. Piatt will prove 
a great inspiration to his audience. Do- 
not fail to hear him. 

The fourth number of this course will 
be given by Mrs. Mary Harris Armor 
from Macon. Georgia, on February 13^ 
1904. Her subject is "The Strangest 
Thing in the World." This lecture 
will partake of the nature of temper- 
ance. Several years ago a temperance 
wave struck the South. This was 
largely credited to Mrs. Armor. With 
whole-souled determination, with won- 
derful enthusiasm, and with tireless 
energy she launched herself into the 
battle and won. If you desire to hear 
some one paint the evils of intemper- 
ance, come to hear the "Ceorgia WHiirl- 
wind." 

On April 17, 1914, John F. Chambers, 
the famous reader will appear for the 
first time on College Hill. His subject 
will be "A Grand Army Man." This 
is a sparkling drama with a distinc- 
tive American atmosphere. It is con- 
structed along modern lines and deals 
with the problems of the home. We 
believe Mr. Chambers will picture real 
life to you and trust yon will come to 
hear him. 

The last number of the course will 
be a "Music Program" rendered by the 
Music Department of the College. 
Elizabeth Kline, our teaclier of Voice 
Culture will be the director. We have 
reasons to believe that this numlter 
will be of great interest to all. The 
date of it is May 7, 1914. 

We urge you all the second time to- 
show your loyalty to the scliool by at- 
tending these lectures and entertain- 
ments, and trust they will be a source 
of inspirati<in to you and help yon to 
get out of life the best there is in it. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



K. L. S. Notes. 

After another vacation of several 
months the Keystone Literary Society 
met in Executive Session on September 
5. The following program was ren- 
dered : 

Music— Vocal Solo, "Absent" and "The 
Bumble Bee Song,'" Katherine Mil- 
ler. 
Select Reading— "Tim Twinkleton's 

Twins," Ephraim Myer. 
A German Selection — "The Town Mu- 
sicians," C. J. Rose. 
Piano Solo— "The Thirteenth Ballad," 

Mary Elizabeth Miller. 
Debate — Res(ilvcd, That the army ac- 
complished more than the navy in 
putting down the Rebellion. 
The afifirmati\-e speakers were : Sara 
Shisler and Owen H'ershey; the nega- 
tive, Ruth Landis and Henry Brandt. 
The judges decided in favor of the neg- 
ative. 

Recitati(in — "Jem's Last Ride," 

Xaomi Longenecker. 
The society met in Literary Session 

September. 12. 

A program was renderd as follows : 

Chorus — ".America," by the Society. 

Recitation — "The Wreck of the Hes- 
perus," Bertha Perry. 

Declamation — "The Present Age," 

John Graham. 

Debate — Resolved. That woman should 
have the right to vote. 

The affirmative speakers were Rhoda 
Miller and Helen Oellig: the negative, 
Harry Aloyer and C. J. Rose. 

The judges decided in favor of the af- 
firmative. 

Music — "When the Fragrant Roses 
Bloom," Girls' Chorus. 



Literary Echo— Grace Moyer. 

On October 3, a Literary program 
was rendered. The new officers were 
inaugurated and the president then 
gave his inaugural address. The fol- 
lowing program was rendered : 
Instrumental Duet— "Moonlight on the 
Hudson," Elsie Stayer and Edna 
\\'enger. 
Essay — "Success Through Failure," 
Ella Hiestand. 
Debate — Resolved, That wealth tends 

to elevate Character. 
The affirmative speakers were : Eliza- 
beth Miller and C. J. Rose ; the neg- 
ative, Sara R°o1~'P"1'= and Robert 
Ziegler. 
The judges decided in favor of the neg- 
ative. 
\'ocal Solo — "Earth now is Sleeping," 
Bertha Perry. 
Discussion — The Situation of Affairs 

in Mexico, Prof. J. S. Harley. 
Literary Echo — Ruth Landis. 

Homerian News. 

Our society though somewhat di- 
minished in number since last year is 
still active. At our private sessions 
little has been accomplished thus far. 
Xew officers were elected at the last 
private sessi<in. The following re- 
ceived the majority of votes and were 
declared elected by the Secretary: 
Speaker, J. D. Reber: Vice Speaker, C. 
J. Rose ; Monitor, Lilian Falkenstein : 
Chaplain, Kathryn Miller; Recording 
Secretary, Lydia Stauft'er; Critic. 
Elizabeth Myer; Reviewers. J. G. Myer 
and J. S. Harley ; Registrar, Nora L. 
Reber. C. J. Rose was recently elect- 
ed an active member of this society. 
.All members eligitjle to this society 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



should not hesitate in joining but do 
all they can to help a good movement 
along. A new society was called for. 
now then let us support it. 

The first public program rendered 
this season follows : 

Prayer— Chaplain. 

Vocal Duet— "Go Pretty Rose," 
Misses Kline and Miller. 



Recitation — "Aunty Doleful's Visit," 
Lilian Falkenstein. 

Paper — "'The Educational Value of 
Literature," Nora L. Reber. 

N'ocal Duet — Misses Kline and 
Miller. 

Address — "Mutation of a Form," C. 
L. Martin. 

Critic's Report— J. G. Myer. 



^-^^^^^^- 



Resolutions of Sympathy. 

Whereas, it has pleased our Heaven- 
ly Father to remove from our midst. 
Dr. Phares N. Becker, the father of our 
fellow .student, Orville Z. Becker, 

And Whereas, in him we had a 
staunch friend and patron of our school 
and therefore deeply feel the loss, 

Be it Resolved, 
. I. That we, the students and the 
faculty of Elizaljethtown College, do 
hereby sincerely tender our heartfelt 



sympathies to the berea\ed family and 
friends. Further, that we commend 
the sorrowing friends to our Heavenly 
Father who is alone able to soothe the 
sorrowing soul through the comforting 
power of the Holy Spirit. 

2. That a copy of these resolutions 
be sent to the family and that the same 
be printed in our College Times. 
H. K. Ober, 
C. J. Rose, 
Ruth R. Landis. 

Committee. 




These columns are to be penned this 
year by a new and comparatively 
young member of the association. In 
this respect we feel our weakness and 
ask the co-operation of the entire asso- 
ciation to make these columns as in- 
tersting as possible. If you cannot do 
any more, you can at least let us know 
a little bit concerning yourselves at 
times. Your classmates and fellow 
alumni will appreciate it. 

Furthermore, it is a duty and a sign 
of loyalty to your Alma Mater. The 
writer's experience as business man- 
ager of this paper during the previous 
year has taught him that not all are 
doing this. Dear reader be sure that 
you are not one of the negligent. 

We regret that the former editor can 
not serve you this year. No satisfac- 
tory explanation why she is not at 
school this year has been given by her. 
But the fact is, that she is staying at 
home and has paid us a brief visit 
only a few weeks ago. The expected 
and the unexpected have often oc- 
curred, however we shall not predict 
for Miss Sheaffer. 

One of these occurrences was the re- 
cent marriage of Mr. William Kulp '12, 
to Miss .'Mma Hoffman from Elizabeth- 
town. They now li\e at Mechanics- 
burg, Pa. 



Prof. J. G. Meyer '05, spent the sum- 
mer at Columbia University and is 
again teaching physical science and 
Greek here this year. 

Prof. R. W. Schlosser '06, built a 
house on the lots recently opened near 
the College and lately moved into it. 
He also held several series of meetings 
in York County during the summer. 
He is now teaching English, ancient 
and modern languages. 

Mr. B. F. Waltz '10, and Mr. L. W. 
Leiter '10. entered Franklin & Mar- 
shall College this fall as seniors. Mr. 
C. L. Martin '13, entered as a fresh- 
man. They report that they are en- 
joying their work. Mr. Tillman Eber- 
sole "11. is also continuing his work 
there. 

Mr. Francis Olweiler '11, entered 
Harvard this fall as a Junior. 

Mr. Edgar Diehm "lo, entered Juni- 
ata College. Mr. Holmes Falken- 
stein '10, and Air. Merton Crouthamel 
'11. are also pursuing their college 
courses at that place. 

The following were visitors at the 
College lately: Mr. James Breitigan 05, 
Mr. John Miller 03, Air. William Glas- 
mire 08, Air. R. F. Waltz 'lo. Mr. L. 
W. Leiter "lo. Air. Russel Hartman 
08. Air. .Andrew Hollinger '10, and 
Aliss Gertrude Hess "n. 




Please Exchange. Exchange is the 
word and what dn we mean by it ex- 
cept it be to criticise others ? Now 
criticism as we look upon it must not 
be confused with fault finding. Almost 
any one can point out some blemish 
in even the best work ; but such carp- 
ing seldom serves any useful purpose. 
However, let us also remember that 
indiscriminate praise is quite as worth- 
less as indiscriminate censure. 

The object then, as you shall note, 
shall be to give praise to whom praise 
is due with a spirit of helpfulness. 
May we then as members of the "Ex- 
change Organization" of 1913-14 be 
mutual. 



We like the moral and social spirit 
involved in the opening exercises of 
Blue Ridge College. The opening ad- 
dress by Eld. Jacob H. Hollinger con- 
tains many noble thoughts in which he 
vividly portrays the importance of 
launching out upon our chance in life. 
Let us watch our chance and make use 
of the opportunities as they fly. 

The very appearance of Oak Leaves 
suggests strength and sturdiness. Not 
only do the covers suggest firmness 
but its contents also point out the un- 
Oak Leaves and feel that the paper has 
a good start and predict for it success, 
seen power needed by all. We like 



Ci0 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



e BEE HIVE STORE 



For 

DRY GOODS 

and 
NOTIONS 

RAIN COATS 

and 
UMBRELLAS 

Shoes, Etc 




SWEATERS 
UNDERWEAR 
HOSIERY 
NECKWEAR 

and 
FANCY 

GOODS 



"Something New Every Day." 



A. A. ABELE, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



CONDUCTED ON SANITARY PRIN- 
CIPLES IS THE 

RALPH GxOSS 

Shaving Parlor 

Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. 
None Better. Few as Good. 

D. H. BECK 

South Market' St., ELIZABETHTOWN 

The baker who knows how. Phone or drop 

a postal. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 

PHOTOS OF ALL STYLES 

FRAMING NEATLY EXECUTED 
Kodaks and Films for sale. Amateur 
Finishing Solicited. Work Guaranteed. 

Centre Square. 



LEO KOB I 

Heating and | 

Plumbing I 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. I 



The Pratt 
Teachers' Agency 

70 Fifth Avenue 
New York 

Receives calls at all seasons for col- 
lege and normal graduates, specialists 
and other teachers in colleges, public 
and private schools in all parts of fhe 
country. 

Advises parents about schools. 

WM. O. PRATT, Manager. 
Plain Suits Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats 

GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange Sts. 
LANCASTER, PA. 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Athletic Goods 



Kodaks and supplies of all kinds al- 
ways on hand in the famous Eastman 
quality. Don't forget us when in need 
of supplies for in or out door sports. 

HARRY K. DORSHEIMER 

Exclusive agency for Hopewell Choc- 
olate Dainties. 

School Supplies. Cutlery 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



iiiiiiBiiiiiBiiii!Biiiiiaiiiiiaimi!i:iaiiiiiBiiiiiaii!!!Hii!!niiiiaiiii:H:iiii! 

G.Wm.REISNER 

Manufacturing 
Jcivclcr 

College Jewelry of the Better Sort. 
Class Pins and Rings, Prize Cups, Fra- 
ternity Jewelry, Medals. 
Watches Diamonds Jewelry 

120 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 



Franklin and Marshall 
College, Lancaster, Pa. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Offers liberal courses in 

ARTS and SCIENCES. 

Campus of fifty-four acres with ten 
buildings including Gymnasium and 
complete Athletic Field. 

For catalogue apply to 
HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 



CENTRAL 
MEAT MARKET 



All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meats. 
H. GOOD, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



WE DO IT RIGHT 



Shoe Repairing 



S. K. BARNES & SON 



F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 
Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 



F. D. GROFF & BRO. 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



F. T. MUTH 



H. M. MUTH 



MUTH BROS. I 

Dealers in * 

LUMBERol 



Also all k 
and mill work, Slate 



of building material 4. 

* 

and Cement, + 

Screens, Fertilizer, Patent t 



Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board, etc. 
COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 
We aim to give you a square deal 
that will merit your trade and friend- 
ship. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Carry 


A 


This Pen 


M 


Upside Down^ 


-ifycuwamto. Y«. many posi- 


1^^ 


tion, any pocket. 

Boys: catry the Parker Jack Knife 


W^^' 


Pen in your trousers pocket along 
wilh your keys. 

Girls: carry it In the pocket of 


Is 


your white blouse. 


Play football with it. — basketball, 
tennis, hockey. It's on the job the 


minute you want to write, without 
leaving a pinhead spot of mk any- 


1^^ 


where It has been carried. 




Write? Just im.ginc a pen of 


flNr^ 






across [aperl That sthcwayit writes. 


^jtr^ 


Price $2. 50 up. Get one on trial. 




Take it back any time within 10 


l^4H 


days if you-te not tickled to death 




withiL We authorize dealer to re- 








I^arkers, write us for catalog loJtiu. 


PtlvW 


PARKER PEN COMPANY 


wM 


IWiU St.. Janesvillc. Wis. 


PARKER 


"ff 


Jack Knife Safety 


.%'<.. /,( 


FOUNTAIN PEN 





Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 



Seven Reasons : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 



Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 

North East Corner Centre Square, 



JACOB nSHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Centre Square. Elizabethtown, Pa. 
With you (or 3.5 years. THAT'S ALL 



I Lehman & Wolgemuthl 
i COAL I 



WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR 
Telephone 



* ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENN'A 1 
t + 

FURNITURE 

F. C. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - - PENN'A 

Chas. B. DiCFOlf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 

VV. R. Ashenfelter | 

CHOICE BREAD AND * 

CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied witli 
Fanjy Cakes at Short Notice. 

S. Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA 

4- 
^♦■ H > * ** > *'l'»l " l"l" l ' i"l " l"i" l "l"> *' > '>*'>** 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING. 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

URSINUS COLLEGE, Collegeville, Pa. 

(24 miles from Philadelphia) 
Group system of instruction. University 
trained faculty. High standards of scholar- 
ship. Athletics encouraged but controlled. 
No fraternites or exclusive clubs. Strong'. 
Christian influences. New dormitories and 
dining halls. Men and women admitted to 
all courses. 

SUMMER SESSION 
Oldest and most inviting college summer 
school in Pennsylvania. College courses 
and preparatory studies. Teaching by heads 
of departments. L^rge shaded campus and 
cool buildings. Terms low. 
GEORGE LESLIE OMWAKE, Pd.D., Pres. 

ELIZABETHTOWN DENTAL PARLORS 
Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday. 
S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 
We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 

Y. M. C. A. BIdg., LANCASTER, PA. 



IH. H. BRANDT % 

1 Dealer in | 

i I 

I ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL m 
I SLATE and ROOFING PAPER § 



I ELIZABETHTOWN 

I 



PENN'A g 

>amiiaiii.Sii:B::;aiiiia':':«L.a».i.KaBiiEBf 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 29 

We ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD 



$1.00 A 
Estimates on any kind of Job Printing. 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



Linotyping for the Trade. 



The place to buy 
Stationery, Pennants, Souvenir Goods, Post 
Cards, and hundreds of articles for your 
pleasure and convenience. Our candies are 
always fresh. LAWRY'S VARIETY STORE, 
Half Block S. of Center Sq., Elizabethtown. 

Boggs Hardware Store 

The best there is in hardware at the 
lowest possible prices. Prompt and cour- 
teous service. TRY US. 



DENTIST 

GEO. rt. KERSEY 
Call to make appointments 
,East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

A. W. CAIN 

Store Adjoining Federal Room 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENN'A 

JOHN A. FISHER 

BARBER 

Centre Square, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

uiiiiiBH:iiBiiini''jEi,iiiiBii;iiH,>iBiiiiia{iiiiai!iiiaiiii:ai!!iia'.NBiiiiiaj 

|jOS. H. RIDER & son! 

H AGENCY FOR ■ 

1 I 

1 SPALDING'S I 

1 I 

I Baseballi Tennis Goods I 
f I 

aiiiiaiinaiiiiiBiiiiaiiiiiBiiiiBiiiiii 



D. B. KLINE 

CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



CEO A. FISHER ♦ 

Hardware | 

Phonographs I 



Records 




I ELIZABETHTOWN J 

X ROLLER mills! 

« J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. * 

♦ Manufacturer of Best Grades of J 

♦ FLOUR AND FEED i 

^ Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, X 

♦ hay and straw ♦ 
X EUZABETHTOWN, - PENN.4. ♦ 

>»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of ifour Patronage. 



The Book Store 



BOOKS, BIBLES, SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPPLIES ■ 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED i 

G. U. FALKEWSTESK, Ellzabethtown, Pa. I 



MIEeSE'S ICE CREAM 

adds ZEST to the MEAL 

Sold in Elizabethtown Ijy 

J. S. GROSS. 

IPaintitiG anb (paper 
IbanGing 

AMOS B. DRACE 

Spalding Sporting Goods 

Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 
Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic 
Shoes. Kodaks and Cameras, de- 
veloping and finishing. 

H . B. H E R R * 

30-32 West King Street ♦ 

LANCASTER, PA. T 




VER 

Seven thousand people buy WALK- 
OVER shoes every day — certainly 
there must be much merit in a shoe 

to attain such popularity — 2| 

In addition to the better quality of ♦ 

our shoes we offer our better man- <!• 

ner of serving you. % 

WALK-OVER * 

SHOE STORE % 

HUNTZBERGER- WINTERS CO. | 

Department Store ? 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'A 4. 

t 



Est. 1884 






■ 


mam 

Est. 


884 


KIRK 


JOHNSON 


cs, 


CO. 






Pianos, Player-Pianos, Victrolas , Sheet Music 


Musical 


Mose 




16-18 W. King Street. 




LANCASTER, 


PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



Elizabethtown Exchange 
Bank 



Transacts a general banking business. 

Pays interest on time deposits. 

Solicits your patronage. 

OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President. ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice. Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 











DIRECTORS 








A. G. Heisey 








Jos. G. Heisey 






J. H. Biich 


Allen A. Coble 








Dr. H. K. BloLigh 






Dr. A. M. Kalbach 


H. .1. Gish 








Henry E. Landis 






Geo. D. Boggs 




E. 


E. 


He 


■nley 


B. 


H. 


Greider 



TAKE YOUR 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morn- 
ing. Returns Wednesday & Friday aiternoon 

Jnd. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 
Catalogues a Specialty 



D. G. BRINSER 



Coal 



Grain, Flour, Feed, 
Seeds, Hay, Straw 
and Fertilizer. 

Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 



311 W. Grant St., 

^nHlllBIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIBIIIBlin 



LANCASTER, PA. 



O. N. HEISEY 



I Provisions, Groceries and Choice Candies i 
1 i 

'IhEISEY building ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 1 



^^'^^^^ 




School Notes 19 

K. L. S. Notes 20 

Forward Concerning the Bible Term 20 

The Faculty Social 16 

An Illustrated Lecture 23 



Alumni Notes 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your I'atronage. 



HERTZLER'S 
Department Store 

Your needs supplied at satisfactory 
trices iu Dry Goods, Gro.e;ies, Ready- 
to-Wear Clothing for Men and Women 
of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Flo:r Oil- 
cloth, Shoes, etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-:Measure 

CLOTHING 

International Tailcrine Co., N. Y. 
American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chi- 

iJ lACk V^Slt Up-toOate Sa-Tiples on Hand. 

Hosiery hertzler bros. & co. 

Centra Square El JZabethtOWII, PS. 




W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Eiizalietlitown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits, $164,000 

General Accounts Solicited. Interest Paid on Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent. 

DIRECTORS 

W. S. Smith Elmer W. Strickler Peter N. Rutt 

F. W. Groff. J. S. Risser B. L. Geyer 

E. C. Ginder Amos G. Coble E. H. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



LH'iniDiiiuaiiiiianiiiBiiuaiiuiBiiiiBiiimuiiiBiiiiaiiiiiBiiiiiaiiiMiiinBi! 
I fiUCHANAN & YOUNG I 

I 115 & 117 N. Queen St., i 



I The New Season's 



Silks 

ARE READY 



= The Icirgest assortrrent of Silks in 
S the Cit/ can be fojnd at "Tiie Store 
H Famous for Silks." 
I BLACK SILKS. 

■ Black Messaline, in a variety of 
f Ijrices and widths. Prices range, 50c., 
I 59c., 75c., ?1.00, $1.25 to $1.50. 

m Black Satin Duchess, with Ijeauti- 
B {\.\ finish, very popular at present. 
S Pri:e range, 79c. to $1.50. 

■ Black Taffeta, an excellent quality 
B and in all the desirable widths. Price 
g lan.e, 50c. to $1.50. 

g Black Peau de Sole, always popular 
= as a dress material, because of its 
§ beautiful, close-woven surface. Prices, 

■ 59c. to $1.50. 

g Black Peau de Cygne, with a beauti- 
I ful, lustrous finish. Prices, 75c. to 
I $1.50. 

Black Charmeuse, just the thing for 
the present day dresses, because of its 
draping possibilities. These are of 
very excellent quality. Price $1.98. 

Black Crepe de Chine; this popular 
silk is being used at present more than 
ever. Prices, 75c. to $1.50. 

BLACK DRESS GOODS 

An excellent variety from which to 
make your selection. Here you will 
find all that is new and up-to-date, 
from the cheapest materials at 25c. a 
yard to the finest all-wool materials. 
We are ready to supply your needs for 
the Fall and Winter. 



When You Come to 
Lancaster to Buy 

Clothing 

KOR IVIEN, BOYS OR 

CHILDRE.M 

It will pay you to visit 

Hirsti & Bro. 

Centre Sqjare, Next to City Hall 
LANCASTER, PA. 

There since 1854 and the only 
clothing house in Lancaster that 
has one price to all and dis- 
counts to none. 

READY-TO-WEAR 

AND 
MADE-TO-ORDER 

CLOTHING 

Men's and Boys' 
FURNISHINGS 



■^ 




Students Will Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



*] j>vi»*' w^/V " — vi ^" w^ / i^'w^/i ^ ' i^^i^i"<^ / i y wv^*' w^i^ " —i^/^r 



IMPORTANT ! 

9^^t' m^\fl M^/I^rl I M^/^l M 



Vlr 



STUDENTS ! 



[■Vlf** '*»^/^' 'O'^ ^ ' 



DO YOU KNOW THAT 

It is only because of the kind patronage of our business and 
cur professional men in this town and elsewhere, that this maga- 
zine exists. They have indeed shown themselves friends of Our 
College and of "Our College Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to 
buy anything, to consider first those who by their advertising 
have made this magazine possible. 

We have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all 
rc3pect3. 

Business Manager of "Our College Times." 



TISEMENTS 



READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



" - ill 

First Showing | 

OF THE NEW | 

Fall Shoes] 

I 

Every Style — every wanted ■ 

Leather — every new shape g 

— is here, ready for your in- | 

spection. Will you stop in p 

to see them today ? | 

I 

LYNCH & EBY | 

"No Shoes Over $3.00" f 

24 North Queen St., ~ 

LANCASTER, PENN'A ■ 



ADVERTISE 



IN 



•OUR COLLEGE TIMES" ;; 



^♦■ 1 I I !■ ■>♦■ > ♦♦<■ I I I I I I I I ♦♦ I I I I I I H 



(§m OloUfgp ©tmPB 



Elizabjcthtown, Pa., November, 1918 



The Call of the City. 



Isaac Z. Hackman. 



Have you ever approached a city 
in the early morning hour when the 
misty landscape before you lay in si- 
lence ? Soon there came to your ears 
a distant sullen roar like the endless 
breaking of the waves on a rocky 
coast or the distant roar of guns in 
some great battle far away, caused by 
the awakening of a giant city from her 
uneasy sluml;ers, and her calling to 
the countrv to come and do her bid- 
ding. 

The call of the city is not always 
.indible to the physical ear of youth, 
but it comes to his mentality every- 
where, and his answer to that call is 
shown by the fact that, thousands and 
tens of thousands of bright young 
minds are getting that preparation 
which will enable them to answer: 
"I am here." 

And how insistent, how imperative 
is this call. It is like the call of a 
nation in a great day, when its life is 
in peril and the drums say "Come !" 
And they come, — the young, the brave, 
and the strong bearing the standards 
onward through the heat and flame 
and smoke of battle till some find fame 
and fortune and many find death, but 
all who do their duty, find glory ! 

The city says. "Come !" It is that 
never ending cry which says 



to the country and the town: "Give, 
give, give me of your 3'oung men and 
young women ; your strongest, your 
brightest and your best to fill up the 
ranks of my countless army of fighters 
in the great battle for business supre- 
macy which this nation is waging 
against the world. I need more and 
more of them as the years pass by and 
as the strife grows fiercer. I must have 
them to take the place of those who are 
killed and wounded in the fight for the 
strenuous commercial life." 

The response from the country and 
the town to this call is immediate and 
endless. If you go to the farms in the 
East or the ^^'est you will find one man 
doing with machinery that which it 
took three men to do ten or fifteen 
years ago. What has become of the 
other two ? They have answered the 
call of the city where they were more 
than welcome, for the city depends up- 
on the country for its fresh blood, and 
a little dash of ha}' seed in his hair will 
not hurt his chance in the least when 
he applies for a position. The super- 
intendent is likely to have borne the 
same sign of his origin when he came 
there only a few years ago. The odor 
of hay or even that of the barn-yard is 
preferable to that of the ten for a 
nickel cigarette which the city lad too 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



often carries about his more fashion- 
able clothes. 

The labor problem in the country 
especially throughout the western 
states is becoming an important one. 
The young man and the young woman 
of energy and ability are eager to go 
and help swell the tide of city dwellers. 
What is the result ? The fathers and 
mothers in their declining years are 
left to care for the farm work with sev- 
eral laborers, and thus the country 
population becomes more sparse, but 
the city population grows by leaps and 
bounds. 

We do not wonder at this, for it is 
natural that youth with red blood run- 
ning hot through its veins should be 
attracted by the tumult of the contest 
for wealth and dazzled by the visions 
of reward which the city promises to 
those who can keep in the front rank. 
And the city keeps its promise to the 
"Front Rank." But it does not to the 
great mass oi ill-prepared people who, 
unable to keep pace in the onward 
rush, are constantly falling out and to 
the rear, whose whole life is a bitter 
struggle for exitsence amid want, pov- 
erty, shame, and crime. 
There are sections in every city where 
the beautiful boulevards with mag- 
nificent homes are inhabited by such 
who have answered the call of the 
city. Then there are the theatres, 
sometimes several located closely to- 
gether, which if you pass at about 
eleven at night empty thousands of 
people into the streets all at once, who 
come crowding along in their brave 
apparel of broadcloth, silks, satins, 
laces, and jewels. There is evidence 
of wealth and prosperity everywhere. 
Large restaurants and cafes are crowd- 
ed with gay "after theatre" supper 



parties, automobiles and cabs bear 
away a throng of richly dressed occu- 
pants. Many of these had answered 
the call of the city not. many years ago, 
and it seems evident that to these the 
citA' has fulfilled her pri-mise nf reward. 
Seemingly, they are of the front rank. 

On the other hand turn with me one 
square from these res aurant> and 
theatres, and we will an-i\e at various 
parks several acres in size. Here on 
the benches, wrapped up in old news- 
papers to help their ragged garments 
keep out the cold, you w 11 find scores 
and sometimes hundreds of men .and 
a good many women sitt'ng asleep on 
wooden or iron benches. They are 
ragged of garment, and not infrequent- 
ly bloated of face, peniiless dregs of 
humanity, outcasts of fortune, drift- 
wood on the shores of the great stream 
of humanity, usually I eg;i:ig stray 
pennies during the day to get drink to 
deaden their senses. The free lunch 
counter is their dining place, and the 
benches in the parks are their beds 
from spring until winter. Many of 
these derelicts are from the ranks of 
country boys and girls, who a few 
years ago with springing step and 
clear eye and hope rising high in the 
heart of vmith answered the call of 
the city. 

Xow you will ask, "How have these 
unfortunates come to such a low state 
of life ?" We may answer that it is 
due to lack of preparation and proper 
home training, and then dissipation 
has done the rest. Many are the young 
men and women who look upon city 
life as one of ease and enjoyment, sad- 
ly \et surely they are disappointed, 
and keen competition of service renders 
them incompetent. The perfume of 
idleness and vice lures them through 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



\arious avenues of human debauchery, 
mone}- is s ion exhausted, friends are 
gone, and t'lc future leaves them in 
despair. 

'riuTL' arc many lunely places in this 
world. \'ou nity have been i n the deck 
(if a steamshi ) far out from the sight 
of land wliere you did not know a soul. 
You may have slept out on a prairie at 
night and the only sound you heard 
was the moaning of the wind as it 
swept through the tall grass, and the 
yel]) of the c lyote ; or you may have 
spent the night in a forest where you 
heard the scream of the wild cat, and 
nothing to see but the stars above, and 
the forest around you. These are lone- 
ly ])laccs, 1 ut are not comparable in 
lonelinc' s v. ith a great ci y to a country 
bo}- or girl without friends, without 
occu])ali ni. and very little or no money. 

Should their fate deter the untried ? 
Xot fur a moment. Any small city 
has its vices and dangers on a smaller 
scale. Indeed all the vices of human- 
ity can be found in a country town 
■ if two thousand inhab.itants. The 
city has its perils, it is true, but the 
city has the magnificent possibilities. 
.Anyone may have access to the refin- 
ing intellectual, moral, and social insti- 



tutions, and nowhere is_ Christianity, 
humanity and charity to be found on so 
broad and elevated scale as in the 
great cities of our country. 

Finally, if the young man or young 
woman in the country today hears the 
call of the city let him answer it if 
his heart responds to that call, but let 
him not go ill prepared. Life is full of 
energy and it demands the best that 
lies within him if he expects any 
measure of success. The ver}- best 
equipment a vonng man or woman can 
take to the city is: first, a good home 
training; secondly, laying a good foun- 
dation educationally. The graces 
namely, culture, virtue, and honesty 
cannot be weighed in value, and are 
more easily instilled into the inind in 
a Christian home than in any other 
place. Therefore it is the home train- 
ing that really makes the man or 
woman. Flowers sometimes grow 
beneath rocks but thev are far more 
likel}- to grow and develop fineness 
of form and color in the well cultivated 
scTil of a garden. The influence a 
cultivated Christian has is a shield 
indispensable against the perils and 
t(?m])tations of a city. 



The Essentials of Success. 



1 



Harvey K. Geyer 



We often listen to what ib said 
about successful men. We see how 
they started in life from a poor street 
urchin and become a college president, 
or a college professor. After study- 
ing their lives, we ask ourselves the 
question, "Why are they successful and 
not we ? What is the secret ? What 
are the mysteries that surround their 
lives? What and where is the road to 
procperity ?" We are sometimes dis- 
appointed to find no royal road, no 
short and easy way, and to discover 
that success during a number of years, 
instead of being the results of bright 
schemes, is due to hard work, persist- 
ent and painful eflforts. It is noticing 
the little things in everything, for little 
things noticed at the- right time may 
save painful anxieties. 

Character is one of the main things 
necessary to succeed in life. Benjamin 
Franklin attributed his success as a 
public man not to his talents or his 
power of speaking, but to his upright 
honest character. It was he who at one 
time said, "I was a bad speaker, never 
elegant, subject to much hesitation in 
my choice of words, hardly correct in 
language, and yet I generally carried 
my point." Character puts confidence 
in men of high standing as well as in 
men of low standing. There is power 
back of character. Even if the intellect- 
ual powers are weak, the individual 
who possesses a good character is more 
powerful and useful than the individ- 
ual who possesses intellectual powers 
without character. Truthfulness, puri- 



ty, and goodness form character. 

Perseverance is another virtue essen- 
tial to success. To hold out to the end 
is the chief thing. If success was to be 
obtained by merely reaching out your 
hand and grasping it, thousands would 
have it, but some are not earnest 
enough, not willing to keep hold to 
the end. We ought not to be disheart- 
ened by diflficulties; they sometimes 
are sent upon us on purpose to try us 
and to see whether we are in earnest. 
A world where everything would be 
easy, where we would not have to work 
scheme, study, and endure would be a 
world not enjoyed. For we enjoy life 
when we endure to the end of some 
task and succeed. 

We must look beyond perseverance 
to be successful in life. Often our 
enemies say things or do things to dis- 
courage or prevent us from advancing. 
Instead of their preventing us some- 
times from advancing they help us to 
advance. For instance, the inventors, 
writers, and teachers of the past had 
pursuers and critics. Robert Fulton 
would not have invented the steamboat 
if he had listened to his critics and 
pursuers when they told him his boat 
would not run, and when it did run 
that he could not stop it. Heedless of 
their jeers and discouraging sayings, 
he stuck to it, and succeeded in his 
enterprise. 

It also takes courage to make a 
success of life. Have courage to speak 
your mind when it is necessary that 
you should speak, and to hold your 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



tongue when it is best not to speak. 
Have the courage to quit the most 
agreeable acquaintance you have when 
you find out that he lacks principle. 
Have the courage to speak to a friend 
lower than yourself, though you may 
be in company with someone higher 
than yourself. Have the courage in 
arranging for entertaining your friends 
not to go beyond your means. Above 



all have the courage to obey your 
Maker at the risk of being ridiculed 
by your friends. 

We ought not be discouraged when 
disappointments come to us. It is 
like Anonymus said, "Celery is not 
sweet until it has felt a frost"and"Men 
do not come to their perfection till dis- 
appointments have dropped a half hun- 
dred weight or two on their toes." 



Conscience 



Albert L. Reber. 



Brooks defines conscience as the 
power by which we know and feel that 
we ought to do what we think to be 
right, and ought not to do what we 
think to be wrong. But this definition, 
without any discussion, gives us only 
a faint idea of conscience. We must 
investigate the source, nature, de- 
velopment, phases, function, and com- 
l)etence of conscience. 

A judge is required to decide a dis- 
pute between two men. First, he must 
have law or a standard whereby to 
measure the claims of both men. 
Secondly, he must himself be the de- 
ciding agent. Thirdly, he must make a 
decision. After he has made the de- 
cision he experiences a feeling of satis- 
faction, if he has given the decision 
according to his standard. 

When we read Job 27 : 6. "My 
righteousness I hold fast, and will not 
let it go: my heart shall not reproach 



me as long as I live," a standard and 
a judge are mentioned, the word 
"righteousness" in this instance mean- 
ing the standard. "My heart shall not 
reproach me." If the heart reproaches 
it may also approve, and according 
to the definition, conscience reproaches 
and approves also. Then the heart 
and conscience are seen to be identical, 
or better still the heart is the seat of 
conscience. Now we have conscience 
seated in the heart as a judge but where 
and what is the standard? The answer 
is Truth and Divine Will, which are 
revealed partially by Nature and in full 
through Revelation. Therefore, just 
as the judge in the illustration judged 
only within his standard so will con- 
science judge only within its standard, 
and just as the judge had to acquire 
his standard so must conscience pro- 
vide its standard, and just as he ex- 
perienced a feeling of satisfaction after 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the decision so does conscience pro- 
duce a feeling. 

Now since conscience exists and 
must provide its own standard let us 
look how that standard is formed. This 
standard is determined by two classes 
of factors ; viz : those controllable, and 
those not controllable by the individ- 
ual. The home, the school, the com- 
panions, the government, and religion 
all bring about conditions and build 
experiences which the individual can- 
not control. His conscience often 
sufifers because of violations, and may 
become perverted, but if it is restored 
its standard is all the brighter and its 
judgm.ents more reliable. Those 
factors in the education of conscience, 
which are controllable, rcc|uire the 
activity of the individual in order to be 
reached. They are: (a) those insti- 
tutions of society which determine the 
truthfulness, loyalty, honesty, and in- 
dustry of the individual : (b) the 
history and biography which he studies 
for their examples and the confidence 
he may gain from them ; (c) the 
things he gives a trial. Conscience 
may be satisfied with the approval of 
inferences from Nature and from 
Literature but utterly fail when facing 
a mora! doctrine or the Re\elation of 
God. It craves for a moral law as is 
seen in the \\orshi]5ful nature of all 
peoples. 

This moral law is the highest stand- 
ard of conscience and the decisions 
based on it are satisfying. The Mo- 
hammedan, the Buddhist, the Christ- 
ian,— each is satisfied with his par- 
ticular moral standard. and he 
is no longer Mohammedan, Buddhist, 
or Christian as soon as he becomes dis- 
satisfied and changes his standard. 

From the foregoing fact we can con- 



clude that conscience is a matter both 
of knowing and of feeling. Before the 
change of standard the man possessed 
a knowledge of both doctrines and then 
his feelings were aroused and did not 
allow him to remain under the old doc- 
trine: Since knowledge preceded feel- 
ing, and feeling immediately followed, 
and since feeling could not have enter- 
ed without knowledge, we conclude 
that conscience is a matter buth of 
knowing and of feeling. 

Although the verdict of individual 
consciences is sometimes the same 
among numbers, as a rule, however, it 
is not of the same nature in all men. 
Conscience, wlien it gi\-es the same 
verdict to numbers is known as a public 
conscience. If there is a crime com- 
mitted, the popular desire is to punish 
the otTender. Conscience is by no 
means uniform among the masses. One 
perstMT may obey his conscience and 
another may not. A conscience if dis- 
obeyed is defiled ; if incapable of 
moral judgment it is seared or brand- 
ed : if it gives wrong deliverances it is 
perverted; if it gives a contentment 
which drives to further efiforts it is a 
good conscience. 

Now let us see what the function 
of conscience is. It is at once recog- 
nized that man possesses a tendency 
to strive for the Truth and the high- 
est Good. Man believes that there is 
some power which has control over him 
and all things. From the fact that he 
believes that force to have power 
over him. he tries to please 
that force by good conduct, and it here 
becomes the duty of cmscienceto act 
as an institution of the higher powei 
to declare the act pleasing or displeas- 
ing. .\ favorable decision does not 
however i)roduce a feeling of entire 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



satisfaction on the part of the individ- 
ual. Tlie i^reater the control river the 
indi\-idual it possesses the greater the 
difficulty to satisfy it. Its aim is to 
be in perfect harmony with the higher 
power and every violation brings a 
ense c^f guilt : an efifort lost, a burning 
of regret. Therefore it is the duty of 
conscience to bear witness to moral ac- 
tions, because it is instituted for that 
purpose only. 

The Competence of conscience is 
often ciuestic;ined. Some o^ the ques- 
tions are: fa) Is conscience a guide ? 
Conscience is no guide because it is de- 
pendent upon a standard: (b) Is con- 
science infallib'e ? As before said, con- 
science is an institution given to man 
by a higher power, and man possesses 



a standard. Therefore since conscience 
exists and exists to act, and since it 
ahva_\-s has a standard, it can not fail to 
act, although that action may be hin- 
dered or deferred sometimes, even until 
after death ; (c) Should one always 
obey the dictates of his conscience ? 
Presupposing a standard in harmony 
with moral law we should invariably 
follow the {lictates of conscience. 
For conscience works by its standard 
and conscience is of God and therefore 
remains unchanged: (d) Does one do 
right who heeds the monition of con- 
science ? There is one standard only 
that is Right. Therefore, one who 
obeys conscience acting with a stand- 
ard other than The Right does not do 
right. 



The Origin and Traits of the Indian. 



George Capetanios. 



Indian, is a term given through ig- 
norance to the race of people who in- 
habited this country before its discov- 
ery. The name most frequently used 
bv scientific writers, especially in 
F,urn])e, is simply .Vmerican. 
The existence of a group of character- 
istic tribes which may be termed as 
American, is not definitely known. The 
liniblem of their origin remains un- 
solved. It is almost certain that no 
common origin for all of them can be 
assumed, but that various sources of 
liopulation and centers of dispersion 



must be considered. Through the 
lack of accurate knowledge of the 
geological conditions existing in earlier 
epochs the most probable routes of 
immigration were from Asia by way of 
the Northwest coast of North America, 
from Europe by way of Greenland, and 
from the general region of Polynesia 
by way of South America. It seems 
logical and reasonable to believe that 
this people came here one of these ways 
mentioned above, perhaps by way of 
Asia on the Northwest coast of Nortii 
America. No doubt the Indians were 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



once Chinamen as they have a great 
many traits and characteristics in 
common. It is more reasonable for us 
to believe that they came this way 
than to believe that they are an ab- 
original people 

There are correspondences in physic- 
al types and culture which tend to sup- 
port the Asiatic theory. In physical 
qualities the Indians make a some- 
what close approximation to the Mon- 
golian type. There is also a certain 
remarkable feebleness of constitution 
combined as it is with vigor, suppleness, 
and strength of body. At least the 
aboriginal races do not resist well the 
epidemics introduced by the whites; 
many tribes have been exterminated 
by the effects of the various habits 
brought in by the more civilized men. 
The red man is usually proud and re- 
served, serious if not gloomy in his 
views of life ; comparatively indiffer- 
ent to wit or pleasantry ; vain in per- 
sonal endowments ; brave and fond of 
war, yet extremely cautious and taking 
no needless risks; and fond of gam- 
bling and drinking, seemingly indiffer- 
ent to pain and hospitable to strangers, 
yet he is revengeful and cruel almost 
beyond belief to those who have 



given offense. The men are usually 
expert in war and in the chase, but in- 
active in other pursuits. In many 
tribes both sexes take part in athletic 
games. They often excel in horseman- 
ship and as a rule their sight and hear- 
ing are wonderfully acute. 

There is a very prevalent tendency 
among recent writers to neglect the 
old traditions of the "noble red man of 
the forest" and the saying is very 
common in this country that the Indian 
is not good for anything. A very dis- 
tinguished American general once said 
that the only good Indian is a dead 
Indian. We must remember, however, 
that the bad Indians of to-day are a 
part of the creation of the white man, 
whose vices have degraded him and 
whose greed has impoverished him. 
Even where from a desire to be just, 
he has been liberally subsidized, reser- 
vation life, with its consequent idle- 
ness and aimles.sness tends to make the 
Indian a discontented pauper. 

The old time Indian had courage, 
dignity, self-respect, and ht)spitality, 
and not one of these qualities has en- 
tirely disappeared from the Indian of 
the present day. 




EDITORIAL BOARD 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, Editor-in-Chief 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 



.School Nbtes 



Mary G. Hershey . . . ( 
Orville Z. Be;ker. . i 

Nora L. Reber...> Homerlan News 

Naomi Longenecker K. L. S. News 



J. D. Reber Alumni Notes 

Isaac J. Kreider Bxcnangea 

J. H. Gingrich Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider Art Editor 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year by Elizabethtown 

College. 
This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their flies, 

and arrearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration, 
Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates:— Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for $2.00. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



Student Loyalty. 
If a student is to secure the greatest 
-nod from a college course, he must 
jmssess the salient qualities of a college 
'-tudent. One lesson he must learn in 
order to succeed in life is that of econ- 
omy. For in this commercial age when 
man travels with the speed of the wind 
and annihilates distance with regard 
to speaking, and when he conducts 
business with push buttons and arith- 
metical machinerj', it is important 
that a young man learn the lesson of 



economy in every department of life. 
He must also acquire the true spirit 
of college life and become studious. 
On the great diamond of life success 
will not be reckoned by the ability a 
young man has to handle a base ball 
bat, to pitch a curve with speed and 
accuracy, or to field a ball with ease 
and sureness, but it will be measured 
by the breadth and depth of mental 
culture mellowed by the spirit of the 
jMaster. We must train our American 
youth to-day first to think and then to 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



play. Again, the college student must 
learn the lesson of punctuality. This 
is particularly true in our present in- 
dustrial age. \\'e can not expect 
opportunities to come to us. because 
there are tnn man\- wide-awake men to 
grasp them, l)ut \\e mu- 1 make o;:'por- 
tunities. This will mean success. In 
fact, there is no secret to success ; to 
succeed is to do the right thing at the 
right time. This implies punctual- 
ity in its broadest sense. There is 
still another quality that is sadly lack- 
ing in the li\-es of so many American 
college students. This is the trait of 
student loyalty upon which we desire 
to treat at greater length. 

The lo}al student will speak a good 
word for his institution as occasion is 
afforded. Consequently, whenever a 
student speaks disrespectfully of any- 
one connected with an institution or 
of any organization sanctioned by the 
management, he is at once in the eyes 
of the judicious, a disloyal student. 
This ma^• occur among the student 
body itself. If the work of the literary 
society does not come up to the stand- 
ard of a particular member or if any 
member does not get the amount of 
work he thinks he ought to have, there 
is no reason why he should speak dis- 
respectful of his .society as a student. 
Any one who speaks thus of his so?iety 
should be ousted by a unanimous vote 
of the members as a disloyal member. 
Disloyalty to a society is no meaner 
crime than treason to a nation. A\'e 
are not statinjj that there are no 
grounds upi>ii which to complain, but 
we do insist that complaint come to 
the proper authorities. Then a rem- 
edy will readily be applied. Students 
sometimes think a fault in a society 



is sufficient ground for not allying 
themselves in active membership. The 
Puritans did not stay a.vay from 
America because some unsatisfactory 
conditions prevailed there. America 
could easily have done without the 
Puritans, but the Puritans would have 
hacT no furtlier development without 
America. Students, the Keystone Liter- 
ary Society is Mother England and the 
Homerian Society your America. Set 
sail as soon as you are eligible f.>r this 
land of greater freedom and unexpl r- 
cd resources. 

Not only should every student speak 
respectfully of the organizations of the 
school to those at school, but also to 
those whom he may meet when away 
from school. Every school u es va- 
rious means of advertising, but none is 
so effective as the good words spoken 
in behalf of the institution by a loyal 
student. Do not speak of the dis- 
couragements and mishaps of an in- 
stitution to your friends unless they 
are in a position to remedy such de- 
fects. Speak about those things to the 
management, but first be sure that the 
discouragement and the grumbling is 
not inherent alone in you. There is 
so much goc^d lo speak about any 
sch(5ol that no one is justified in grum- 
bling about a few things for which one 
may have a personal antipathy. Show 
your loyalty at all times bj- speaking 
a good word for your Alma Mater. 
for that alone brings you credit in the 
eyes of the prudent. 

The loyal student will also do all in 
his power to enrich the school and 
beautify its surroundings. The mu- 
seum of our institution has a large 
collection of specimens from the vege- 
table and the mineral world, mo<t "f 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



IS 



which represent the gratitude of for- 
mer students and teachers. Rut there 
are many specimens which would 
I)rnve a \ahiable asset to the school, 
that we are sure ould be secured at 
a small j)rice, or perhajjs gratuitously. 
merely by si^me student, alumnus, or 
friend of the irstitutirn asking for 
tiiem. Reader if you have some relic 
lliat is of interest to the cause of edu- 
cation, send it in, and it will be duly 
labeled and thankfully acknowle'ged. 
Let every student take pride in his 
institution and see what he can do by 
the end of the year. 

Our library also needs more liter- 
ature. \\'e pride ourselves in our 
library, because few schools can boast 
I if so manv volumes for the number of 
years that the college has been open 
f(ir work. There are few books in 
nur library that are of little value to 
tjie student. Rut we desire more 
literature for wider reading, and we 
niiw ask the assistance of every student 
t'l secure additional volumes. Some 
I if our students have already contribu- 
ted half a dozen books. This shows a 
spirit of loyalty. Let each student 
examine his store of books and see 
what he desires to donate. If there 
is no book which you desire to give 
;iv,ay. s 'licit ne from some friend in 
yiiur community. If this fails, inform 
the Libraiy C immittee that you have 
fifty cents to donate to the library. 
With, this insignificant sum a good 
\<ilume of standard literature may be 
liought and placed in the librar\ as 
a memorial of y-jur love for the school, 
a book V. hich may be the means of 
' r.couraging some student to a noble 
> areer. Why? Recause you donated 
liftv cents to the librarv. ' Is it worth 
v.hile Kibe lovai? 



An institution needs to be attract- 
ive outside as well as within its walls. 
For the purpose of securing a better 
campus an ajipeal was made last year.. 
It was responded to by a few and, as 
a result, a corner of the cr.mpus is now 
covered by a beautiful verdsnt lawn. 
This is one v.ay in which yo:i can assist 
in the improvement cf t ie aesthetic 
influences of the col!e<.;e. Every stu- 
dent by a careful disposition of all 
waste material can assist the janitor 
and the superintendent of the grounds- 
in presenting a clean r.nd well arranged 
campus. There is also no excuse for 
a waste paper, basket to present the 
appearance of the path of a cyclone. 
These storms, however, we are glad to 
state, ha\e not passed over College Hill 
this year. The loyal student will assist 
in keeping the halls and campus of 
iiis college free from v>aste materia!. 

Finally, the loyal student will re- 
spect the management of the institu- 
tion. All the rulings of the Board of 
Trustees and the Faculty are for the 
good of e\-ery student. Rules are not 
made with a view to curtailing pleasure 
or privileges but with a view of grant- 
ing the highest good to the greatest 
number of students. The ruling of an 
institution represents the thoughts and 
desires of the founders of that school; 
they represent years of experience; 
they are the expression of those who 
are t-u!y cnceined in dur welfare; 
the\' are in accordance with Christian 

\\ ith e\er_\- institution there is con- 
nected the unvrritten law. .\nd no 
less important are these laws than 
those that arc written. In fact, many 
<if the most important rules pertaining 
to college life are n<it found in print 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



or writing. Every institution relies 
upon the honor and integrity of its 
student body. It has a right to expect 
them to be polite, courteous, honest 
Christian gentlemen. This is no less 
important than obeying faculty regu- 
lations, society rules, and teachers' 
class room directions. When a stud- 
ent knows it is the desire of the man- 
agement to do something, he should 
do it without any solicitation by any- 
one. This would be showing respect 
and loyalty to those in authority — a 
lesson that must be learned in life 
sometime. The wish of the faculty is 
not a ruling which must be complied 
with by a loyal student. Failure to 
comply with a reasonable wish of the 
chairman of the Faculty is the "non 
plus ultra" of disrespect and disloyalty. 



Obeying the unwritten law is the "sine 
qua non" of staunch loyalty to an 
Alma Mater. 

In short, loyalty to an institution 
means a true abiding in the spirit of 
the founders of the school. Our noble- 
hearted and self-sacrificing trustees 
devised that which would be in accord- 
ance with the true development of 
the Christian gentleman and when we 
oppose any part of the system we set 
up our poor, inexperienced judgment 
against that of experience, and defeat 
the very purpose of the fathers of the 
institution. Let us ever be loyal to 
the principles for which EHzabethtown 
College stands. Let us be loyal to 
ourselves in the development of our 
Christian graces and our hearts will 
beat in harmony with the pulse of our 
Alma Mater. 



The Faculty Social. 

One of the most enjoyable socials 
ever held at EHzabethtown College 
was given by the Faculty on Friday 
evening, October 31. 

The students were ushered into 
Room C and given slips of paper con- 
taining a clue to their identity. 
What a distinguished family of Lady- 
bugs ! What a hard time Mr. Dusty 
Moth had trying to locate his wife ! 

The families vied with each other in 
remembering the most objects on the 
observation table. 



Presently the various insects and 
bugs proceeded in a gleeful way to the 
library for refreshments. Apples, 
chestnuts, peanuts, stuffed dates, pretz- 
els, pumpkin pies, and coffee were serv- 
ed. 

The following program was given 
informally by various members of the 
Faculty: Rtcitation. Miss Lilian 
Falkenstein ; Vocal Solo, Miss Kath- 
erine MSller ; Speech, Prof. Harley ; 
Instrumental Solo. Miss Mary Eliza- 
beth Miller: Vocal Solo, Miss Eliza- 
beth Kline. 



ERRATA — Through an error 
cupying the place of page 1! 



1 makeup pages 17 and 19 were transposed, page 
and page 19 the place of page 17. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



student of this place, was suddenly 
taken ill by an attack of appendicitis 
during the last week of October. He 
was at once removed to the Good Sa- 
maritan Hospital at Lebanon where a 
successful operation was performed. 
\\'e, the Faculty and the students of 
his Alma Mater, wish him a speedy re- 
covery and return to College Hill. 

Miss Staufifer looking at a set of 
silver mechanical drawing instruments 
exclaimed "What beautiful nut-crack- 
ers they are I" 

Miss Stauffer would like to know 
who locked Prof. Harley in Room C on 
the night of the social?" 

On Hallowe'en the Faculty enter- 
tained the students in a Social which 
proved to be a very enjoyable occasion. 
'The Hallowe'en decorations, the re- 
freshments, the program, — everything 
was very artistically and interestingly 
-carried out. 

The old and barbarous method of 
celebrating this nieht has vanished 
from "College Hill" these many— at 
least a few— years, never to return. 

Mt. Ira Herr claims that "Love 
affairs make me blue." We wonder 
why. 

Wh.i is the person on College Hill 
who is so unpatriotic to his country 
and so narrowly educated, politically 
as to remark : "I wouldn't cheer for 
Wilson. He's a Democrat." We are 
glad thnt a spirit of true patriotism 
which is regardless of politics and 
which is the real buoyant power under- 
lying it, is found among practically all 
at -school. We credit no ideas opposing 
this lofty one adopted among us. 

Miss Kline: "I prefer Dixon pencils 
more cverv dav." 



We say : "There's a reason." 
Miss Meyer : " ' I often thought of 
marrying' is correct." We think so 
too. Are there an}- more like that on 
College Hill ? 

Mr. Wise: "There once was a soldier 
who had such big feet that one day 
when he went to battle he told his 
comrades to push him over if he was 
shot." 

Dr. Reber to Miss Kline in Cicero: 
"Please decline a boy. ' 

Miss Kline : O Doctor ! I never 
could do that. 

.\ temperance league has been organ- 
ized at the school and it will hold its 
first public program on the night of 
November the twenty-fifth. Every- 
body is invited to come and also to join 
in the great Christian cause for temper- 
ance. 

Mr. Kreider in English: "The knight 
in the Canterbury Tales wore a figure 
of Christopher Columbus on his shield. 
No professor he didn't. He wasn't 
born yet. but it was a figure of St. 
Christopher." 

Because of the early Autumn, basket 
ball has had an early start. A number 
of games have been played of which the 
most important are the following: 
Lane. Co. Belles. Maryland Lasses 
Spangler L. Guard E. Miller 

Harshberger R. Guard HofTer 

Landis Center Kable 

Miller L. Forward Longenecker 

Garber R. Forward Brubaker 

Score — Lane. Co. Belles — 2^. Maryland 
Lasses 4. 

Three interesting games have been 
played between the Athletics and the 
Champions, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



No lecture has ever been the subject 
for discussion in so many class periods 
following its rendition, or woven it- 
self into conversations of all kinds not 
only for a day but ever since, as has 
the lecture given by Dr. Driver. If 
the Library Committee is fortunate 
enough to get him back next year we 
know that all who heard him will be 
there again if possible, but to you who 
have not we would say, "Hear him, if 
you can, wherever it may be, for his 
message is a noble one." 

Mr. Rose to Miss Myer : "We're 
studying the Prologue of Chaucer just 
now in English." Mr. Rose our libra- 
rian seems to have passed through the 
prologue of his life. 

The Senior Class has now fully or- 
ganized and although it does not claim 
great quantity it manifests sterling 
quality such as our school is proud to 
produce. 

^Ir. ^loyer: "I am not going to con- 
fine my attractions to the kitchen this 
year." 

We are sorry to note that Miss Ella 
Ebersole of Hershey, Pa., cannot be 
with us this year on account of the 
illness of her mother. Her position as 
table-waiter has changed hands often 
since her departure. 

Miss Grace Moycr upholds the state- 
ment : "It is better to love what you 
canniit have than to have what you 
cannot love." 

"F. L. P>." These seem to be favor- 
ite letters of Miss Harshberger. She 
sjjcnds just one class peri d each day 
in practicing them in memory of days 
g. ne I;y. it is sui)posed. 

The tennis season is fast drawing 
to a close after a busy and enjoyable 



season under the careful Presidency off 
C. J. Rose. 

Mr. Fred L. Burgess is at present 
time working in the "Southland" but 
we expect to see the basket-ball cham- 
pion with us soon again. 

Rev. Jones paid his annual \isit to- 
Miss Myer and the College on Oc- 
tober the sixteenth. He gave a short 
and interesting talk on the develop- 
ment and need of Friend's Negro 
College of South Carolina which he 
represents. He also elucidated quite 
freely on the comparative greatness of 
Paul, Plato, Aristotle, Teddy Roose- 
velt, and Dr. Reber. We welcome our 
colored brother back as often as he may 
wish to call, an invitation which he 
says he will accept at least for the com- 
ing twenty-five years. 

After the Chapel exercises conducted 
by Rev. Jones, Prof. J. G. Mj'er, who 
is also Curator of the museum of the 
College, gave us an interesting talk on 
"How to Enlarge our Museum." Dur- 
ing his talk he explained the uses of 
many of the exhibits now in the library. 
Let us hope that this address may be 
a great impetus to the growth of the 
museum of this place. 

Mr. Rose: "If I go past a bunch of 
roosters and crow, they all begin too." 
We are not surprised at this statement 
for his "crowing" is as the "bark" 
started by Messrs. Hackman and Zug,. 
which became a school slogan last year. 

Miss Gertrude Kable who was a 
student here last year visited iier old 
chum. .Miss Ruth Landis and some 
other intimate friends at school a few- 
weeks ago. She exjiccts to return 
somelime in the future. 

Mr. Laban W'enger, a pr spcrous 




Uld 



uid she 



mild 
steals 



To liini will I 111 the love of Xature holds 
Comiminion with her visible forms, 

she speaks 
A various language; for his gayer 

hours 
She has a voice of gladness 

smile 
And eloquence of beauty : 

glides 
Into his darker musings with 
And healing s_\Tnpathy, that 

away 
Their sharjjness e:e he is aware. 

— Bryant. 
O Student I Ha\e you been a reader 
-of the second greatest Book this Earth 
of onrs lias ever been presented with, 
fhe Book of Nature? In this season 
of tlie year when she is bedecked in 
unrivaled beauty, "bearing such solemn- 
ity and grandeur tliat human hands 
may not imitate ; have you held "com- 
munion with her visible forms?" If 
not, awake, and receive thy heritage 
for it is a princely one. College Hill, 
as it is situated along a beautiful slope 
in "the garden spot of the world," 
surrounded with just as beautiful a 
countri- scene, is at this time of the 
year a spot richly blessed by Nature in 
whlcTi each nook and corner thus array- 
ed in colors gay when christened by 
Jack Frost, sparkles with gems too rich 



fur human turms to wear. Let us awake 
to all this beauty around us and prove 
the exception to that proverb which 
sa}s, "A stranger must show thee the 
jewels at thy feet." 

On the evening of November the 
sixth an audience in the Market Hall 
in Elizabethtown, listening to the 
second number of the Star Lecture 
Course given by the College, heard 
the music of nature, the mother's lul- 
labv, the throbbing call of the dance 
and many mere of life's activities, as 
woven together in marvelous plots by 
our greatest musical composers, pour- 
ed out to them through the artful 
medium of music when the greatest 
living blind musician, Edward Baxter 
Perry, conversed to them through his 
beloved "Ivory and Ebony Keys." 
This Piano Recital giving us some of 
the world's greatest musical classics 
and interspersed with a precise de- 
scription oi the marvelous plots Ij'ing 
liack of them, proved to be of the 
greatest interest to those present. 

Almost three weeks before the Piano 
Recital. Dr. John Merritte Driver a 
man whn — as he himself states it— has 
lixikcd into the faces, "of all the 
pen])les of all the nations of all the 
races of all the earth" gave his popular 
lecture "America Facing the Far East." 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Athletics Champions 

Hershey R. Guard C. h. Martin 

Kreider L. Guard J. D. Reber. 
Wise Center Geyer 

Brandt L. Forward Rose 

Becker R. Forward Herr 

Scores, first game: Athletics lo, Cham- 
pions lo; second game, Athletics 31, 
Champions 17; game called because 
of lateness of the hour. Third game, 
Athletics 36, Champions 6. 

Mr. C. L. Martin who graduated 
from this place last year is now attend- 
ing Franklin and Marshall College 
where he expects to receive his A. B. 
degree. 

A Foreword Concerning the Bible 
Term. 

On Wednesday, January 14, 1914, 
at nine o'clock, the next Bible Term 
opens at Elizabethtown College and 
continues until Saturday, January 24. 
The class work will offer special ad- 
vantages to Sunday School workers 
and ministers. Church workers of all 
kinds, however, and all interested in 
obtaining a better knowledge of God's 
Word will greatly profit by attendance 
at the sessions daily and evening, from 
first to last. 

Elder John Calvin Bright of Troy, 
Ohio, is expected to preach doctrinal 
sermons each evening throughout the 
term excepting Jan. 24, when Dr. 
Byron C. Piatt will lecture on the 
subject, '."When We Dead Awake." 

Elder J. G. Royer of Mount Morris, 
111. will be with us again and will give 
instructions two jjeriods daily along 
lines to be announced later. 

Elder J. M. Pittenger, who spent 
eight years in mission work in India, 
will be with us and talk one period 



daily throughout the term on Mis- 
sions as based on the life and writings 
of Saint Paul. 

Elder S. H. Hertzler will continue 
his Exegetical work by teaching the 
book of First Corinthians. 

A novel feature of this year's Bible 
Term will be the using of the book 
entitled "Training the Sunday School 
Teacher," recently issued by the Breth- 
ren Publishing House, as a text book 
in a number of the classes. Prof. Ober 
will teach the last part of this book 
treating on Sunday School Organi- 
zation. Lydia StaufTer, the Bible teach- 
er of the school, will teach the part 
dealing with lessons from the Old 
Testament. Dr. D. C. Reber will give 
instructions on the part dealing with 
the pupils, and it is expected that 
Brother Royer will take the other two 
parts of the book. 

Elizabeth Kline, the Vocal Director 
this year, will teach one period daily 
in sacred music. 

There will be three special programs, 
an Educational Program. Jan. 17, at 2 
P. M. ; a Temperance Program, Jan. 
18. at 10:30 A. M.; and a Ministerial 
Program. Jan. 24, at 2 P. M. 

.\ special circular is being prepared 
announcing the work more specifically 
and giving further necessary informa- 
tion. This circular will be mailed to 
elders of congregations or anyone else 
interested in a more extensive knowl- 
edge of the Bible. 

K. L. S. NOTES 

On October tenth, the Keystone 
Literary Society rendered an interest- 
ing program on the subject of trees. 
It was as follows: 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Essay — "The Use of Trees," Bessie 
Horst. 

Discussion — "Under the Shade of 
the Trees," Frank Wise. 

Essay — "The Effect of Trees on 
Climate," John Graham. 

Recitation— Irene Wise. 

Music — "Swinging 'Neath the Old 
Apple Tree," Society. 

Essay— "Famous Trees of History." 
A, J. Replogle. 

Music — "Woodman Spare That 
Tree," Society. 

On the seventeenth of October, a 
program was rendered as follows : 

Song — "October Gave a Party," 
Girls' Chorus. 

Recitation — "October's Bright Blue 
Weather," Anna Brubaker. 

Recitation — "Death of the Flowers." 
Mary Hershey. 

Music — "Rain on the Roof," Mixed 
chorus. 

Debate — Resolved, That the Beau- 
ties of Autumn are greater than those 
of any other Season. 

The affirmative speakers were 
Orpha Harshberger and Robert Zreg- 



ler ; the negative, Harry Mover and A. 
J. Replogle. 

Music — Instrumental Solo, Edna 
\\'enger. 

Recitation — "The Bear Story," Kath- 
ryn Miller. 

Literary Echo— Ruth Landis. 

After the inauguration of the new 
officers, on October thirty-first, the 
following program was rendered: 

Music — "America," Society. 

Essay — "A View of Our Ipportu- 
nities," Edna Wenger. 

Recitation — "A Bunch of Cowslips," 
Xora Spangler. 

Debate — Resolved, That there is 
more Pleasure in Anticipation than in 
Realization. 

The affirmative speakers were Naomi 
Longenecker and Oram Leiter; the 
negative, Carrie Dennis and David 
Markey. 

Music-"0 Ye Tears" and "The 
Ivy Green," Elsie Stayer. 

Discussinn — "The Value of Liter- 
ary Society," Miss Elizabeth Myer. 

Literarv Echo — Sara Shisler. 



-^^^^«:^- 




Mr. Elmer Ruhl, '08, was elected 
principal of the Maytown High School. 

Mr. Linaeus B. Earhart, "10. is serv- 
ing his third term as supervising prin- 
cipal of the Smyrna Schools, Smyrna, 
Delaware. Mr. Earhart spent the 
.summer at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Mr. .\m(is IHottenstein. "08, is at 
the head of the cnnmercial department 
of the Du Hois High School, Clear- 
field County, Pa: 

Miss Luella G. Fogelsanger, "03, is 
teaching- shorthand and typewriting at 
Juniata College, Huntingdon, Pa. 

The following are some of those we 
kniiw of who are teaching either in 
public, high, or graded schools: 
Wni. I'". Christman, '12, Walter F. 
Esiiclnian. '\2. George H. Light, '07 
.Mamie P.. Keller, '12, May Dulebohn, 
■(Vi. .Mire G. Newcomer, '08, Agnes 
Ryan, '&>. Florence Miller. "lo, Nora 
L. Kcher, 'u. M. Irene Sheetz, '12, 
Rehikah Shearfer. '13, Ray Gruhcr, '10, 
II. I',. I...ngonccker, 'm. 

R. W. Schlosser. '07, is teaching 
ancient languages and English ; J. G. 
Mi\'cr. '05, physical sciences and 



mathematics: H. K. Ober, '08, biologic- 
al science; H. H. Xye,, 06 history and 
civics; Lilian Falkenstein, '11, Latin 
and spelling; Gertrude Miller, "09, 
typewriting; Elizabeth Kline, '05, vocal 
and instrumental music ; L Z. H>ick- 
man, '07, penmanship; J. D. Reber, '09, 
commercial branches; .\una Wolge- 
muth. "oS. short-hand. 

"Miss Orpha Harshberger and Mr. 
Orville Becker of the class of 1912 have 
returned and are pursuing the peda- 
gogical course. From the class of 1913 
Messrs. C. J. Rose, .\. L. Reber, and 
Ira Herr have returned to take the 
College course. Miss Rhoda Miller 
also returned to take further pedagog- 
ical work. 

Will E. Glasniire, "07, book-keeper 
and head manager of the Early and 
Wenger planing mills at Palmyra, Pa. 
was instrumental in having a very ser- 
viceable cabinet made for the use of 
the students in Chemistry and Physics. 
The students will place their experi- 
ment sheets on its shelves at the close 
of each lab >ratory pariod for aporoval 
and correction. The cabinet contains 
twenlv-^ix ^helves, two of which may 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



be used for placing reference books 
and the rest for experiment blanks. 
Each student is assigned a shelf. The 
cabinet is a valuable addition to our 
equipment in Room B. It is as hand- 
some as it is serviceable. 

Mr. Glasmire hired a team to bring 
it to the college all the way from Pal- 
myra. After he got here he spent sev- 
eral hours in putting it together. The 
teacher of science and the management 
are grateful to Messrs. Early and Wen- 
ger, who furnished the material, and 
especially -to Prof. Glasmire for this 
expression, of loyalty. Donations like 
these from'ciur alumni put their A'ma 
Mater under binding obligations to re- 
ciprocate every favor possible. 

W'c are proud to say that another 
one of our number has sailed to the 
foreign shores to bring the word of the 
gospel to the heathen. Miss B. Mary 
Rover, '07, sailed recently for India. 
This country also claims Miss Kathryn 
Ziegler, '08, and J. M. Pittinger one of 
our former teachers. Miss Royer paid 
a visit to the College shortly before 
sailing. 



Miss IMary Schaefifer, '13, entered the 
Bethany Bible School this fall. She is 
preparing for the mission-field and is 
doing some actual work along this 
line besides her studies in Chicago. 

Mr. Jacob Hackman, '13, took a 
hciueymoon trip to Niagara Falls sever- 
al weeks ago with his bride, formerly 
Miss Naomi Stauflfer. Mrs. Hackman 
was a former student at Elizabethtown 
College. IMr. Hackman started in the 
general merchandise business shortly 
after commencement and is conducting 
a prosperous business. 

Cupid's arrow has also pierced the 
heart of Miss Ruth Stayer, '07. During 
the summer she was married to Mr. 
David P. Hoover, a student of Juniata 
College. Mr. and Mrs. Hoover now 
live at Tyrone, Pa., where Mr. Hoover 
holds a pastorate. 

Miss Olive Myers. '08, requested her 
address for Our College Times to be 
changed to Golden, Colorado. Miss 
Myers went to Colorado for her health. 
She reports that her health has much 
improved and that she is enjoying 
mountain life verv much. 



An Illustrated Lecture. 

Prof. J. S. Tllick, of the State Forest 
Academy at ^Nlont Alto, Pa., will give 
an illustrated lecture in the Elizabeth- 
town College Chapel on the subject 
"Present Management of the Forests 
i)f Pennsylvania." The date of this 
lecture is Thursday evening, December 
18, at 8 o'clock. This is a special lec- 
ture for the benefit of our school more 
particularly and for everybody inter- 
ested along this line. 

Professor Illicl: spoke at the College 



Arbor Day Exercises several years ago, 
and those who heard him may antici- 
pate hearing something exceedingly 
interesting on this occasion. Prof. 
Illick has studied Forestry in America 
and in Germany and contemplates 
making anithcr study tour through the 
forests of Germany, .\ustria. and 
Switzerland next sjtring 

Due announcement of this lecture 
will l)e made further in our town papers 
and window hangers. 




Our College Times wishes to ac- 
knowledge the October exchanges. 
We are glad for the large number 
which serve us as a source of inter- 
collegiate knowledge as well as a foun- 
tain of enjoyment. 

We are in receipt of the following: 
The Washington Collegian, The Aero- 
lith. The Normal School Herald, The 
Hall Boy, The Purple and Gold, The 
Philomathean Monthly. The Weekly 
Gettysburgian. Normal Vidette, Oak 
Leaves, The Blue and \Miite. The 
Albright Bulletin, The Palmerian, 
The High School Journal, The Signal, 
The Pharetra, The Susquehanna. Blue 
and Brown. Linden Hall Echo, the 
Daleville Leader, The Dickinsonian, 
The Friendship Banner, High School 
News, Juniata Echo, The Pattersonian, 
The Ursinus Weekly, Hebron Star, 
The Carlisle .Arrow, The Mirror, and 
the Goshen College Record. 

The Washington Collegian. The 
article on "The Claims of Colombia 
against the United States concerning 



the Panama affair should be submitted 
to a Court of International Arbitra- 
tion," is worthy of reading with care- 
ful consideration. 

The Susquehanna. We like the 
versatility of your paper. 

The Mirror. May the noteworthy 
desires in the organization known as 
"The Camp Fire Girls," be sought and 
propagated. 

The M. H. Aerolith hails to us from 
Wisconsin. Give us some more articles 
that are as instructive and timely as 
"Die Mission in Mexico," and "Ein 
Blick in Das Welttall." 

The Dickinsonian. Good goods 
generally come in small packages. 
Education as we look at it consists of 
a harmonious development of the 
physical, moral, and intellectual fac- 
ulties. You certainly have the physical 
phase of it portrayed in your paper. 
Just a few more words of the moral 
and the intellectual side would add 
considerably to the interest of your 
paper. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



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S,L^ 



For 

DRY GOODS 

and 
NOTIONS 

RAIN COATS 
and 
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Shoes, Etc 
"Something New Every Day." 

CONDUCTED ON SANITARY PRIN- 
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R^LPH GROSS 

Shaving Parlor 

Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. 
None Better. Few as Good. 

D. H. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN 

The baker who knows how. Phone or drop 

a postal. 




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SWEATERS 
UNDERWEAR 
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The Pratt 
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Receives calls at all seasons for col- 
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Advises parents about schools. 

WM. O. PRATT, Manager. 



Plain Suits Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats 

CANSMAN'8 

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Kodaks and Supplies 



Athletic 



Kodaks and supplies of all kinds al- 
ways on hand in the famous Eastman 
quality. Don't forget us when in need 
of supplies for in or out door sports. 

HARRY K. DORSHEIMER 

Exclusive agency for Hopewell Choc- 
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School Supplies. Cutlery 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



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F. DISSINGER and H. H. CARMAN 

GENERAL BLACXSWITHS and 
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Kiorseshoeing a Specialty. 

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F. D. G5?C5Fr & BRO. 

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Mention Our College Times When Writing. 27 



IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

Seven Reasons : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
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Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 

Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-WIade Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre 



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GEORGE LESLIE OMWAKE, Pd.D., Pres. 

ELIZABETHTOWN DENTAL PARLORS 

Office Closed Thursday 
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We furnish everything in 
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Y. M. C. A. BIdg., LANCASTER, PA. 



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CLOTHIER AND 
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CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
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uMi 


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The Religion of the Old Testament Age ;, 

The Home and the School 8 

The Temptation of Sir Gawain ii 

The School as a Social Center 14 

What Life Should Ue 16 

Editorials 

The Universal Gift 17 

School Notes 19 

The Bible Term Daily Program 21 

K. L. S. Notes 22 

Homerian News 22 

Alumni 23 

Exchanges 25 



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I BUCHANAN & YOUNG 

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I The New Season's 

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a Black Satin Duchess, with beauti- 
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■ Price range, 79c. to $1.50. 
I Black Taffeta, an excellent quality 
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I ranre, 50c. to $1.50. 
m Black Peau de Sole, always popular 
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~ Black Peau de Cygne, with a beauti- 
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Black Crepe de Chine; this popular 
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An excellent variety from which to 
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from the cheapest materials at 25c. a 
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'OUR COLLEGE TIMES" 1 



I 1 1 11 » * ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦ 1 1 1 H » ♦ M ♦ 



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ELIZABIfTHTOWN, Pa , DeCEMBEB, 1913 



The Religion of the Old Testament Age. 



H. H. Nye. 



.As \\c read the pagts of the Old 
Testament we find that there is a con- 
stant unt )ldiiig' of religion. If we read 
from (Genesis to Revelation we glean 
the idta that the theme and predomi- 
nating ])urjiose of the entire compila- 
tion is the slow but sure revelation of 
the religion of the True God, the Uni- 
versal Father. In order to understand 
more clearly the revelations of God to 
the human race we should have an ade- 
(luatc knowledge of Bible history, for 
as we read and study this phase of the 
Word, we are constantly shown the 
workings of the principles of the only 
true religion. For whether we ana- 
lyze the oppression of Israel in Egypt, 
the wanderings in the wilderness, the 
conquest of the promised land, or any 
historical movement even down to the 
very crucifixion of the Blessed Christ, 
we see instance aften instance of God's 
eternal plan of redemption. Just as 
in secular history we see the human 
race constantly striving after the at- 
tainment of freedom, so in sacred 
history we see God's people ever 
reaching forward toward that bound- 
less and unspeakable freedom in the 
realms of the blest. 

The religion of the Old Testament is 
divided into two epochs: the patri- 



archal age, and the jieriod of the 
Mosaic covenant. In the patriarchal 
age God first deals with his chosen 
familj- through the patriarch Abraham. 
Thus the patriarch becomes the priest 
or the mediator between God and man. 
Religion centers about the altar, which 
goes to show that it was very simple 
in form. The idea embodied in the 
altar was that it was a meeting place 
between God and man ; the purpose 
that it prefigured, the sacrifice of Christ 
on the Cross. Important instances of 
sacrifices on the altar are: Cain and 
Abel's olTerings, Noah's offering after 
the deluge. Abraham, s altar at She- 
chem. Bethel, and Hebron in Canaan, 
the proposed sacrifice of Isaac on 'Sit. 
Moriah, Isaac's altar at Beersheba, and 
Jacob's altars at Shechem and Bethel. 
The altar was constructed with stone 
in such a manner as to make it con- 
venient to lay upon it wood and the 
sacrificial animal which was usually 
one of the best of the flock. The pur- 
pose of the offerings was to express 
the gratitude and the consecration of 
the one sacrificing. Human sacrifices 
which were prevalent among the sur 
rounding nations were forbidden by 
the patriarchs. 
Another characteristic of the patri- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



archal religion was God's various 
means of revelation. One of the most 
common modes of God for revealing 
his purpose was through visions and 
dreams. Important examples of this 
mode are the call of Abram in Meso- 
potamia, and again his visions in 
Canaan ; God's rebuke of Abimelech 
in a dream ; Jacob's vision of the 
ladder at Bethel, and again his direc- 
tion to go to Egypt in the time of the 
famine. 

Another means of revelation was by 
the ministry of angels. Examples of 
this are found at the time when an 
angel appeared to Hagar directing her 
to submit to Sarah's hand, promising 
the birth of Ishmael. and foretelling 
the career of his life ; when angels ap- 
peared to Lot foretelling the destruc- 
tion of Sodom and warning him to flee ; 
when the Lord visited Sarah at the 
time of the birth of Isaac: when the 
angel appeared to Abraham on Mt. 
Moriah and told him not to lay a hand 
upon his son Isaac and promised him 
a blessing for his faithfulness ; when 
the angel guided Abraham's servant to 
procure Rebekah as Isaac's wife ; when 
the angel told Jacob to return home 
after he had received Leah and Rachel 
as wives from the house of Laban, and 
again an angel meets him before com- 
ing to Easu and telling him not to fear 
his brother. 

There are also instances which show 
that God also prompted the actions of 
his people through direct intuition, or 
in other words, by appealing to con- 
science. An example of this is found 
in the troubled conscience of Cain after 
he had slain Abel ; also when God re- 
vealed to Xoah that He would destroy 
the earth on account of its violence: 



and when God directed Jacob to erect 
an altar at Bethel. 

Then, again there are instances of 
personal prayer to God. Abraham 
once prayed for the healing of Abime- 
lech ; Abraham's servant asked God for 
speed and guidance when he went to 
seek Rebekah to be tlu- wife of Isaac. 

Another characteristic of the patri- 
archal religion was that it was insti- 
tuted by the special call of Abraham 
and that God's plans were revealed to 
His people through the niediati'jn of 
the patriarch. To the patriarch God 
made His strong promise which was 
often renewed. The seal of the faith 
was the rite of circumcision of all 
males. This rite was to Ise performed 
when the child was about eight days 
old. All circumcised Hebraws were 
to be cut off from the ho ise of Israel. 
Even Abraham observed this rite at 
the age of ninety years, he and Ishmael 
being circumcised on the .-ame day. 
The fulfillment of the Abrah:imic prom- 
ise was made by making Israel the 
great nation that it later became, and 
out of. which should come the Christ, 
the Redeemer of all mankind. 

The second epoch of the pre-Chris- 
tian religion was the era of the Mosaic 
Covenant. We have noticed that the 
patriarchal religion was ciiaracterized 
by its simplicity ; whereas, on the other 
hand, the Mosaic code is distinguished 
by its elaborate ceremonies and careful 
specifications concerning the moral life 
and religions. 

One of the first phases of the new 
religious system is the institution of 
the Passover. This occasion commem- 
orates the deliverance of the Israelite> 
from Egyptian bondage and typifie-; 
and ])oints forward more vividly than 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the early sldiic altar to the Crucifixion 
when Christ should heconic (Utr I'ass- 
< >\'er. 

The second phase is the giving of 
the law on Mt. Sinai. This was first 
spoken ;.iidibly to the people and then 
engraxed i>n two tables of stone. The 
first four of the Ten Commandments 
lay the basis of a new system of wor- 
ship: the latter si.K are an epitome of 
the great mo;al law governing the re- 
lations of man to man. This giving 
I'f the law helps to bring about a more 
thorough orga'Mzation of the Israel- 
itish Church. God had now definitely 
revealed the great principles that 
should govern religion and morality, 
in other words the Church. 

Besides this comprehensive summary 
of law. God gave Moses a detailed sys- 
tem of civil, judicial, and ceremonial 
laws. In the civil laws we see the moral 
law worked out in greater detail, show- 
ing an endless number of applications 
in the intricate relationships of man- 
kind in the everyday life of commerce, 
industry, and servitude. 

In the ceremonial laws plans are laid 
for the construction and equipment of 
the Tabernacle, an institution which 
I* antedates the temple, the synagogue. 
1 and lastly, the Christian church. In 

I the tabernacle the priest is the central 

figure who performs the inost impor- 
tant service. His sacrifices and inter- 
cessions prefigure similar phases of 
the great mission of Christ. The offer- 



ings and the atonement b^tli symbul- 
ize the great atonement of the .Son of 
Man. 

Furthermore, a number of feasts 
were provided for, which commemorate 
important events in the Hebrew re- 
ligion and which added to its formality. 
Thus we see that the era of the Mosaic 
law marked a great advance froin the 
siinple religion of the patriarchs toward 
the modern era of the Christian Church. 

The Mosaic law was observed verj- 
faithfully at times and with great effort 
owing to the drastic and stringent 
measures of the law. This was es- 
pecially true when the Israelites were 
under strong and efificient leadership. 
But often idolatry became entangled 
w^ith the true worship and religion 
dwindled into a cold and formal ad- 
herence. But God every time devised 
ways and means for the preservation 
of His religion by calling and com- 
missioning a great leader in the person 
of a judge, a king, or a prophet. Here 
and there the prophet through divine 
inspiration gets a glimpse of the 
glorious future when a New Covenant 
should be made with the human race, 
when the Messiah, who had been 
of the world, should come and bring 
the gospel, — a covenant not engraved 
on tablets of stone but written in the 
hearts of men whose sincerity and 
righteousness should occasion the 
blessing and uplift of all nations. 



The Home and the School. 



Sara G. Replogle. 



The U\-o influences which are fore- 
most in the development of the child 
are the home and the school. With- 
out the home, the school could not ex- 
ist ; therefore, it should be the aim of 
the school to make the home what it 
should be. 

Since the child lives in the home be- 
fore it enters the school we will speak 
of the home first. The home is a 
unique and fundamental social insti- 
tution with duties to perform which 
cannot be readily assumed by any 
other, among the most important of 
which is the moral training of children. 
When a child is born into the home it 
is a helpless creature. While in a 
state of helplessness it is nourished 
and cared for by the parents. As th^ 
child grows and its senses develop, the 
responsibility of the parents increases. 
The training which the child receives 
and the principles which are instilled 
within it in the home are preparing 
it for the school as well as for life. 
The home is a leading factor in ruining 
or saving the child ; therefore, the par- 
ents should realize the great responsi- 
bility which rests upon them and use 
tact and skill in training their children. 

The great (|uestion which may con- 
front the parents is, "What can I do in 
urdcr ti) instil within my child such 
principles as will guard it against the 
wrong and keep it in the right path 
when it enters the school or comes in 
contact with its associates whose in- 
fluence may not be f<ir good ?" We 
shall nnt attempt fullv to answer this 



question, but we wish to L;ive a few 
suggestions or mention seme was's by 
which such principles might he instill- 
ed in the mind of the child. In 
the first place, the '"would-be" parent 
should receive some training along the 
line of caring for and training children. 
We would think it very unwise for a 
person to enter the school-room as a 
teacher who did not first .spend some- 
time in preparing for that work. Yet 
the teacher has the child under its con- 
trol only a short time compared with 
the time it is under the control of the 
parent. 

In the next place, no ]jarcnt should 
attem'it to rear children unless the 
have accepted Christ as their personal 
Savior and can thus exert a Christian 
influence over their children. They 
owe it to their oilfspring an', i* they 
deprive them of it, they are rob1>ing 
them of the greatest power that will 
tend toward instilling within them the 
principles that will hel]) them to over- 
come the temptations of life. 

.Again the lesson of obedience should 
be taught in the home because man 
lives his best life by being obedient. 
Obedience, t(«^. marks the difference 
between a civilized jjeople and savages. 
It also prepares the way for sympathy 
and usefulness. A parent should take 
great interest in his children, join with 
them in their ]>lay, and be ready, if 
possible, to answer the manv questions 
which the child may ask. But with all 
this the parent should not fail to de- 
mand obedience from the child. The 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



>. Miner the jiarents show the child that 
they mean wliat they say the better it 
will he for the child. Parents should 
lie careful then not to tell the child 
~uch thiiio-s that will cause it to lose 
ci inlidence in tliem. 

Then ag-ain. the co-operation of the 
parents is \-ery _ essential in teaching 
the child to he ol:)edient. The moth^- 
>linul(l -^anctinn what the father says 
tn the child in the \va}- of correcting 
the child ; likewise the father, what the 
mother says. The conversation in the 
home .'■hmild be such as will tend to- 
ward uplifting the child rather than de- 
grading it. Good stories with morals 
in them can be read or told to the child. 
These things may seem insignificant, 
yet we feel that if they are carried out, 
the child will be more likely to be able 
to (i\erciime tMnptations in life. 

Xow we ha^•e considered to a certain 
extent the influence which the home 
exerts over the child. \\'e shall next 
consider th? influence which the 
school exerts over it. There was a 
time in the world's history when 
schools. — that is organized institutions 
of learning, — did not exist, \\niat 
training the child had. it received in the 
home or from private tutors. The 
home, however, was the main center of 
learning. Nearly all kinds of work 
were done right in the home; such 
work as, making the clothes that were 
worn, manufacturing useful articles, 
making bread, and so forth. But now 
things have changed. The homes are 
not what they were then. In too many 
linines it seems it is impossible for the 
motlier t > dn her own cooking, baking, 
and sewin'.r: therefore, it is impossible 
f'T her to teach her children along 
this line of work. The modern schools 
not onh- educate their students to be 



home-makers, but they also educate, 
and thus prepare them for the various 
vocations of life. 

\Mien the child reaches a certain 
age it lea\es the home, so to speak, and 
enters the school. This age varies, 
however, because of the different kinds 
of schools. Children at a very early 
age are sent to the kindergarten. The 
purposes of these schools are to pro- 
vide amusements for the child, and 
direct it in its play. Many parents 
may think that play does not mean any- 
thing to the child, but in this they are 
mistaken. It is a wise plan for the 
parents to accompany their children to 
the kindergarten and thus be made to 
know the advantage of such institu- 
tions and also be made to realize the 
great interest which the teacher takes 
in their children. 

As the child grows older it enters 
the school proper. Here the child 
should receive the training which the 
home lacks or is unable to give. The 
mother is burdened with other duties 
in the home ; therefore, she cannot 
teach the child as it is taught in the 
school, even though she might have 
as much education as the teacher in 
the school-room. 

Since the aim of the home and the 
school is to prepare the child for life, 
these two institutions should be very 
closely united. There should be no 
conflict between the work of the home 
and the school. We have just said 
that, the father and the mother should 
work in unison for the proper develop- 
ment of the child, and so should the 
home and the school work in unison. 
The great question which confronts 
educators today and which they are 
trying to solve is, "Mow can the home 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and the school be brought into closer 
relation ?" 

Neither can we answer this question 
satisfactorily, but we will give some 
sug-g-estions on how we think they 
might be brought into closer relation. 
An ideal parent will be concerned about 
his child when it is not in his care. His 
interest in his child will be so great 
that he will visit the school in order to 
learn what his child is doing in school 
and also to become acquainted with 
the teacher. If a man would have a 
good horse, he would hesitate to give it 
into the hands of some one with whom 
he was not acquainted. Why then 
should he give that of his own flesh and 
blood into such hands ? 

But if the parents are not interested 
enough in their children to come to 
visit the school of their own accord, 
special efforts should be taken by the 
teacher to get them there. She can 
have the school prepare a special pro- 
gram to which the parents may be in- 
vited. Some parents will respond to 
this invitation, and others will not. The 
teacher should not became discouraged 
U the first attempt to get all parents 
there fails, but she should try again ; 
perhaps by using other means she will 
succeed. When the parents once be- 
come interested they will come without 
special invitations. 

Rut if the parents visit the school 
only on special occasions they cannot 
fully determine the success of the 
school. It might be wise for the teach- 
er to get some definite time during 
which she desires the parents to come 
and sec the pupils proceed with their 
regular routine of work. I'oth jiublic 
days and exhibits dn mnre than anv 



other means to acquaint the parents 
as well as the community with the aims 
and the life of the school. They tend 
to arouse the pride and the loyalty of 
the citizens and often lead to more 
generous appropriations for school ex- 
penses. It is not necessary for the 
community to know the needs of the 
school ? The school depends upon the 
community for its subsistence. 

It is just as necessary for the teach- 
er to know the home life of the child 
as it is for the parents to know its 
school life. The teacher should not 
fail to enter the homes of her pupils 
if it is just for a short time. It will 
encourage the pupils and also the pa- 
rents if the teacher \-isits th m and it 
will also help to unite more closely 
the home and the school. 

Special steps are being taken in some 
places for the purpose of bringing the 
home and school into closer relation. 
School .Associations are being formed. 
The pivotal point of these organiza- 
tions is the child. There is a study of 
child nature for the purpose of learn- 
ing the laws which govern the de\'elop- 
ment of 'the child. When jjarents 
once learn these laws they will be more 
interested in the school. Parents' 
Institutes are being held, too, at some 
places. Here important questions are 
discussed which should arouse 'the pa- 
rents to a sense of their duty toward 
the education of their children. Every 
means available, for the uniting of the 
home and the school, should be used, 
because where the home and the school 
work together there are happy results 
in scholarship, 'and in moral and 
social (lualities which tuakc life worth 



The Temptations of Sir Gawain. 

Orville Z. Becker. 



The story of "Sir Gawain and the 
Green Knight" is a vivid picture of 
the high ideals set up for a knight in 
olden times. The ideal knight is fit- 
tingly pictured in the character of Sir 
Gawain when he prepared to leave his 
lord's court in search of the Green 
Knight. He wore the pentangle be- 
tokening truth. He was pure as gold, 
void of all villain}^ endowed with all 
virtues, fearless of all, lacking in no 
deed which would bring honor. Sir 
Gawain, also, "was faultless in his five 
senses, his five fingers never failed him, 
all his trust upon earth was in the five 
wounds that Christ bore on the cross, 
and in stress of battle he drew his 
strength from the five joys which the 
Queen of Heaven had of her child. He 
was unrivaled in frankness and fellow- 
ship, purity and courtesy, and had 
compassion that surpassed all." These 
were the ideals set up for a noble 
knight so that he might be able to fight 
the temptations confronting him. 

Fear or cowardice must have proved 
to be one of the greatest incentives 
for a knight. For when duty called 
him he dared not lack doing anything 
because of his lord, and his lady-love, 
he must lose his life rather than bring 
dishonor upon himself and his admirers 
by manifestations of cowardice. 

When the Green Knight entered the 
hall of King Arthur it seems as if the 
greatest reason why the knights did 
not immediately respond to his chal- 
lenge, was not courtesy and respect to 
hini, not dumbfounded surprise, but 
cowardice, even fear for their lives. 



We see that Sir Gawain was first of 
the knights to realize this, and not 
to succumb to the temptation but to 
do his duty as a brave knight. 

It is also an important fact that a 
man of such standing as a noble Knight 
of the Round Table who is taken on 
honor even to the extent of ofTering 
his life for the sake of a covenant has 
an unlimited number of chances to act 
the coward and bring dishonor upon 
himself in comparison with a man of 
lowly birth, who has no admirers, who 
craves no lady-love, who owns no foot 
of ground — much less a castle — and 
who has no honor to lose, no chance to 
exhibit cowardice, no life to lose, save 
a miserable one. But in spite of this, 
when the covenant between Sir Gawain 
and the Green Knight was made the 
thought never occured to him to let 
fear rule his heart, to refuse to go in 
search of the Green Chapel as he had 
promised, and there to offer his life, as 
all thought to lose it. He lacked noth- 
ing of a real knight up to this time and 
worthily was his name mentioned ad- 
miringly on many lips. 

When the time for departing from 
the house of his lord, his fellow 
knights, and all that was dear to him 
came, he left as befitted a knight, a man 
of valor, showing no fear for the 
calamity which it seemed would fall 
upon him soon. On a journey through 
many a strange land, in peril and pain, 
and in hardships many, waging numer- 
ous fights against man and beast, he 
survived only because of his valor, and 
though he wandered many a weary day 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and perilous night, yet he pressed on 
Avith all the ambition of a true man of 
valor. Although up to this time he 
had many thrilling experiences before 
which the average man would long 
have fallen, yet a true knight like Sir 
Gawain, who pauses in no deed for his 
life could and did thus far easily over- 
come all temptations of fear and 
cowardice ; of treachery and brutality, 
of discourtesy and disrespect. 

When after many hardships Sir 
Gawain was taken at the great castle 
which later proved to be only two miles 
distance from the Green Castle he, to 
all outward appearances, was shown 
the greatest courtesy that it was pos- 
sible to show even to a man of such 
standing, and yet under this great 
blanket of courtesy, of court show, 
was a treacherous plan that would 
shatter the valor, virtue, and honor of 
all but the bravest of knights and 
which was to prove the greatest temp- 
tation that ever befell Sir Gawain and 
the occasion in which he almost fell to 
dishonor. 

The lady who lived in this castle, — 
the Castle of Bernlak de Hautdesert, 
was Morgain le Fay, a woman with 
masterful control of the charms of 
woman's"^ speech, with perfect mastery 
of the crafty arts of a sorceress, with 
all the charm and beauty, with all the 
ravaging personality of a Cleopatra. 
This woman it was who, while using all 
the powers in her control to beguile the 
guest under her roof, so nearly caused 
the downfall of Sir Gawain and plan- 
ned the plot that was the greatest 
temptation that e\er befell him but 
which haply ended only in an act of 
slight disloyalty to his host. Tlis de- 
parture from the paths of perfect 



knighthood was caused by a longing 
desire for life. 

During the time of the covenant, 
which was renewed three days, Bern- 
lak de Hautdesert each day presented 
all his spoils from the chase to Sir 
Gawain as the covenant demanded. 
During each of these three days Sir 
Gawain passed through a period of 
temptation while in c impany with 
Morgain le Fay to which temptation 
the average person would have fallen 
but which he resi.sted because of his 
lioiic;-, and the :K',\enture which was 
but a few days distant, and because 
his co\'enant which demanded him to 
give all to his host which he received 
during the day. Thus resisting all 
temptations, and not even accepting 
the l<i\c the lady showed towa'ds him. 
but simply rccei\ing the kiss of cour- 
tesy at the earnest request of the lady, 
he delivered all to his host that he had 
received the first day, which was one 
kiss, the second day, two kisses. But 
on the third day he broke his vow, for 
the sorceress had at last found a weak 
spot which was a love for live, and 
finally caused him to accept in addition 
to the three kisses, her girdle which 
would make him immune from death 
while wearing it and would thus save 
his life which thus far he had expected 
to lose on New Year's Night. On 
this evening he gave his host three 
kisses as his spoils of the day but did 
not give the girdle and thus he fell to 
this temptation, thus commiting this 
act of disloyalty to the one who was 
sheltering him. 

.Mthough this lady clothed in the 
guise of love was tiie greatest temp- 
tation ever placed before Sir Gawain 
vet man\- other temptations were made 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



til Cdiili-diu liiiii t<i tem])t his valor. 
JMir ux;uiii)lc, tlie ,t,niide tliat went with 
liini tried U> dissuade liim from his 
|)iaii (if mceliiit;- tltc {"ireen Kniyht who 
in reality was liernlak de Hautdcsert, 
his lord, by describing the awfulness of 
this character and suggesting never to 
t)etray him if he fled. Btit cowardice 
because of fear of battle Sir Gawain 
knew not, and in refusing this sugges- 
tion which would have been very 
tempting to a coward, he avoided what 
would have proved his downfall, caus- 
ing him t(i be despised by all. For. 
instead of never being ' betrayed, it 
would ha\ e been spread through the 
length and breadth of the country 
tJiat he had been called to 
this ])art of the country for the purpose 
of testing his honor and valor as one 
of the best of those who sit at the 
Round Table, and had disgracefully 
Inst his claim to true knighthood. 

.\t the appointed time Sir Gawain 
met the Green Knight to receive his 
reward. Because of the Green Girdle 
the axe on the third and real stroke 
cut only into the skin. It would not 
have done even this but as Bernlak de 
llautdesert says : "Sir Gawain, thou 
didst lack a little and was: wanting 
in loyalty, yet that was fi'r no evil 
jiurpose nor for wooing either, but be- 



cause thou lovedst thy life — therefore I 
blame the less," 

At this time Bernlak de Hautdesert 
revealed himself and his wife, the plot 
of his wife and her arts, and congratu- 
lated Sir Gawain as the most faultless 
knight that ever trod earth because he 
fell not to their plot save the accept- 
ance of the girdle because he loved his 
life and for no other purpose. 

Sir Gawain, Xow realizing his mis- 
take, consoled himself only in the 
thought that throughout the ages the 
greatest temptation of man, the making 
a fool of him, and the bringing of him 
to sorrow was through the wiles of 
woman. This, as he thinks, is seen in 
Adam, Solomon, Samson, David, and 
millions more, some of whose lives we 
know about, but most of whom have 
not risen above the veil of the masses 
because they, not like Sir Gawain, fell 
to even much smaller temptations, not 
bein.g able to control the infirrnities of 
the flesh when beckoned through the 
wiles of woman. 

Thus Sir Gawain meeting tempta- 
tions, plotted for the downfall of the 
greatest of knights, fell not save in a 
small act of disloyalty and because of 
his valor he was restored to those who 
sit around the Round Table and enjoy- 
ed their honor and pleasures for many 



The School as a Social Center. 



Orpha Harshberger. 



Dy the school as a social center, we 
mean that the school house shall cen- 
ter all piiri osin^^ of the community. 
It is also very evident that there are 
at least five important directions in 
which the school may work as a social 
center. 

First, it is a place for play. The 
children, in the evening after school 
hours are over, about four o'clock in 
most schools, seek some kind of enjoy- 
ment in the streets. Children are con- 
tinually moving about doing one thing 
or another. They in this way get into 
many places in which they should not 
be found ; such as, the moving picture 
shows, large stores, saloons, pool 
rooms, station houses, and many places 
where cil predominates. 

Rut if the school and its ground are 
open to their use they can enjoy them- 
selves in the right atmosphere and in 
wholesome games such as every child 
enjoys. Those who sometimes do not 
prefer to play could spend their time 
in the building, attending to some 
little phase of school work which they 
love to do, such as manual training, 
sewing, piano practicing, or drawing. 
Thus in many ways the child could 
overcome his bad impulses which he 
receives on the streets, and start for- 
ward his purposes in life with high, 
clear, and noble ambitions. 

The second iihase of the topic is 
school as a training place for social 
duties. The children of this day need 
an instructor with them continually to 
teach them Imw to act while in com- 



pany and to fit them to meet the prob- 
lems which they will encounter when 
they grow up into manhood and 
womanhood. As a social center for 
children the school has the greatest 
opportunities to improve a child. Some 
educators hold that the school hours 
should be from nine in the morning 
till four in the afternoon, thus keeping 
the child at hard work upon his studies. 
But the more prominent educators of 
the day say that the child should spend 
half a day accumilating knowledge 
and the other half applying it. To do 
this the school building should stand 
on a large tract of land so as to permit 
ihe child freedom in performing his 
duties. In school, while the child is 
yet young, is the time to instil into 
the minds of the young their oppor- 
tunities in life, the work that is requir- 
ed of them in the future, and the best 
way of performing it. Education of 
the head regardless of moral and 
social relations lead to the greatest 
crimes, and to far-reaching injustice 
to the child. It causes intellectual 
selfishness and baseness. Nearly all 
crimes are traceable to the point where 
education was for educati m only and 
not for service. 

In the ^narrower purpose of the 
school, the teacher alone attem|)ts to 
do the work; but t<vday .some better 
trained teachers are realizing the im- 
possibility of doing such a thing. The 
teacher of to-day realizes the necessity 
of cooperation with the parents in 
order to gain effectual work. Once 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



the teacher learns individually to know 
each parent, she realizes the task that 
is before her in every child. She 
learns from the parents the different 
moods of a child, his ambitions, and 
his weak jjoints much better than she 
could find out for herself. Therefore, 
we should have parent-teachers' meet- 
ings in the school so as to bring the 
home and school into closer contact 
with each other. Invitations should 
be sent to the parents so that they 
might attend the meeting. The meet- 
ing should consist of music, one or 
more classes in gymnastics, and a few 
addressess on the co-operation of the 
home and the school. The principal 
should take this opportunity for im- 
])ressing upon the minds of the parents 
some of the little details in Ii''e in which 
they could help along by admonishing 
the child at home. During the meeting 
the work of each child in two or three 
subjects, should be on exhibition for 
the examination cf the parents. It 
should represent as nearly as possible 
the true standing of the child in his 
school work. The teacher should be 
in her class-room and meet the parents, 
discuss with them things pertaining to 
the child's work, and give them her 
opinion of the work. Of course, these 
meetings may be before school is dis- 
missed some day, but more often in the 
evening when both father and mother 
have more leisure to attend. 

Another interesting feature in the 
schools as social centers is the lecture 
course that should be given in every 
school. It is often possible to have an 
extended University Course through- 
out the whole year. If none of these 
can be obtained, the prominent men 
nf the town should fill their places. 

These lectures should be illustrated 
because the illustrated ones are the 
most effectual on the minds of both 
parents and children. Many people 
refuse to attend that line of education- 
al work. The parents especially should 
be urged to attend. If they get in- 
terested the children will also come and 
enjoy these l^tures and receive great 
benefit. Some of the most important 
lectures to be given should be those 



relating to child growth and child 
needs. Through these means we may 
make lasting impressions on the minds 
of parents that will assist in the proper 
training of the child. 

The school is a gathering place for 
the alumni. In having th :m gather 
at their Alma Mater and organize, they 
are bound closer tjgether and their 
energy so focused that it leaves a 
reacting influence upon the good of 
the schools and is uplifting to the com- 
munity. In many \\ ays the alumni 
may be helpful to the younger people 
in the setting of good examples for 
them, in providing entertainment, and, 
in inviting them to social functions 
which would be ennobling and helpful 
along their line of work. If the alumni 
are closely bound together for the ac- 
complishment of a certain end much 
good may be done. Different classes 
of different years may by their do- 
nations and gifts add many improve- 
ments to the school building, ground, 
or different departments : such as. the 
Science Department, the Library, and 
the Domestic Department. 

There are many more ways in which 
the school may be a social center in 
helping to keep the boys and girls from 
evil influences and in giving them 
nobler and higher aspirations. One 
thing that may be for their especial 
benefit and also for that of the school 
and the cominunit}'^ as a whole, is the 
publishing a school paper. This may 
contain locals, school notes, alumni 
notes, and be particularly for the pub- 
lishing of high grade essays, declama- 
tions, mirations, and poems written by 
the pupil. Every child likes to see his 
name in print and in this way a spirit 
of rivalry for recognition is aroused 
in each child. 

Thus we see that in many ways the 
school may be a means for bettering 
the lives of our boys and girls and fit- 
ting them to cope with the greater re- 
alities of life in days which are to come. 
In this waj- the child gains a better 
health than in loafing, also a clearer 
knowledge of what is required of him, 
and a willing mind and heart to do 
that work. 



What Life Should Be. 



Linda B. Huber. 



\"ictnr Hugo's tjreat S3ul found ut- 
terance in his later _\-ears for these 
thoughts : 

"I feel in myself the future life. I 
am like a forest once cut down ; the 
new shoots are stron<;er and livelier 
than e\er. I am rising, I know, toward 
the sky. The sunshine is on my head. 
The earth gives me its generous sap, 
but hea\-en lights me with the reflec- 
tions of unknown worlds. 

"You say the soul is nothing but 
the resultant of the bodily powers ? 
\\'hy, then, is my soul more luminous 
when my bodily powers begin to fail? 
The nearer I approach the end, the 
plainer I hrar around me the heavenly 
strains if nnisic of the worlds which 
invite me. 

"For half a century I have lieen 
writing my thoughts in prose and in 
verse, history, philosophy, drama, ro- 
mance, tradition, satire, ode, and song. 
I ha\e tried them all, but feel I have 
not said the thousandth part of what 
is me. When I go down to the grave 
I can say like many others, T have fin- 
ished my day's work.' But I cannot 
say. T 'have finished my life.' My 
(lay's work will begin again the next 
morning. The tomb is not a blind 
alley: it is a thoroughfare, it closes on 



the twilight, it opens on the dawn." 
The other day a man boasted of his 
long life? What profits it how many 
days have dawned on his life if no pro- 
gressirm has been made. If one day 
be like that which has gone before, 
with no mental growth or spiritual 
growth, then it matters little if one's 
years are more than three-score and 
ten. 

Life should be deep and wide. It 
should be full of activities, full of deep 
thoughts, full of contact with the views 
of others. T-ife, this present life, is 
going to be ju^t what we make it, and 
the next life shall be just as we make 
it eitlicr great and full of keen enjoy- 
ment or small, meager and mean. 

"Life I I know not what thou art. 

r.ut know that thou and I must part; 

And when, or how, or where we met 

I own to me's a secret yet. 

Life ! We've been so long together 

Through pleasant and stormy weather, 

'Tis hard to part when friends are dear, 

Perhaps 'twill cost a sigh, a tear; 

Then steal away, give little warning. 

Choose thine own time; 

Say not 'good night' but in some 

brighter clime 
Rid me 'good morning.' " 




EDITORIAL BOARD 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, Editor-in-Chief 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 



.School Ntotes 



Mary G. Hershey. .. | 
Orville Z. Besker.. I 

J^lora L. Reber Homerlan News 

Naomi Longenecker K. L. S. News 



J. D. Reber Alumni Notes 

Isaac J. Kreider Excaanges 

J. H. Gingrich Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider Art Editor 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year by Elizabethtown 

This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to .break their files, 
and arrearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Report any change of address to the Business Manager. <, ,„ nn 

Subscription rates:— Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for ?^.UU. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



The Universal Gift. 

Christmas, Merrj- Christmas Day, is 
now the cynosure of every life directed 
by the Sky Pilot, of many Christian 
lands, who have not yet accepted 
Christ as their Savior, and of thous- 
ands in heathen laqds who are now 
led by the bright Star of Bethlehem. 
It is indeed fitting for all mankind to 
pay this tribute to this day, which 
celebrates the birth of our Lord, for 
on this day was born a Savior who 
should take away the sin of the world. 
And since salvation is by grace, the 



gift of God, it is evident that on this 
day God gave unto the world his only 
begotten Son, as The Universal Gift to 
all mankind. 

With this day is associated the 
giving of gifts. This is no surprising 
fact ; for. in addition to God giving us 
a priceless gift, we read of the Wise 
Men of the East, who brought gifts 
unto the Savior at Bethlehem. In all 
our giving of gifts at this season of the 
year, as well as at all other times, 
there should be only one motive ; namc- 
Iv, that of love. There can he no true 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



tjiving without this spirit. "The gift 
without the giver is bare." When God 
gave his Son to the world he gave a 
part of Himself, and the only motive 
in His giving was love for all mankind. 
John 3:16. Giving that expects recijno- 
cation is a business transaction, in 
which both persons may feel as if they 
were running a risk. This feeling is 
not experienced by the cheerful giver ; 
he feels the blessedness of giving; he 
is prompted by love. 

The giving of this Universal Gift 
ought to be symbolic of all our giving. 
God gave his Son at a very opportune 
time. We will do well by avoiding 
promiscuous and thoughtless giving. 
Those who are really in need of a gift 
ought to be taken into consideration. 
Can we not reduce the cost of some of 
our gifts to our friends and use that 
money in purchasing presents for 
homeless children and poverty-stricken 
families ? A gift in the Savior's name 
at an opportune time may mean the 
salvation of a soul. Then, too, God 
gave his best as a gift in unspeakable 
love. Ivikewise, we ought to give with 
a loving hand the best we can afford, 
and we could aiTord to give the best, 
the finest of the wheat, — if our love 
were great enough. 

^^■c shall now consider why Christ 
is The Universal Gift. In the first 
place, he is The Universal Gift because 
he is given to pe iple in every stage of 
life. Wluther a man be rich or poor, 
Christ loves him all the same. If one 
is dearer to him than another, it is the 
])oor man. .Xbraham Lincoln said, 
"God lo\es the pnnr people, or he 



would not make so many of them.'" 
Rut after all God holds rich and poor 
alike responsible for the salvation of 
their souls. Whether a man be a saint 
(^r a sinner, it is the love of Christ that 
keeps him holy or entreats him loving- 
ly to come unto God. 

Christ is The Universal Gift also be- 
cause he was given for all ages from 
the cradle to the grave. It was Christ's 
death on the cross that paid the penalty 
for the sin in which we were conceived 
and born. It is alone through this 
meritorious death of Christ that the 
child that dies before reaching the age 
of accountability is in a saved relation 
with God. But he is not only the Sav- 
ior of children but of youth, stalwart 
men, and aged pilgrims. It was Christ 
who died for the Adamic sin of us all 
and who has provided a plan of 
salvation by which 1 ur p;rso:ia! sins 
may be blotted out. 

Primarily, Christ is The Universal 
Gift because he died for every race of 
man in every nation. He is alike the 
wonderful gift, the mighty Redeemer 
of the yellow, the black, the red, and 
the white race. The color of a man's 
skin does not place him in a particular 
class bf men in God's sight. All human 
beings are MEN before God, the great 
judge of the world. We ought to be 
happy because we belong to the white 
race and live in America ; but we ought 
not to lose sight of the fact that be- 
cause of this, we are responsible to 
God for more opportunities, and that 
the soul of the Indian, the Chinaman, 
and the African a- • just as preciov:-. to 
God as our own -^^ ' is. 



















t 



L 



u 



A hearty welcome to the Yule-tide 
now rinsjs in every heart. Where is 
the person who at this joyous season 
has not had his heart kindled by the 
fire of charitv and has not caught the 
Christmas spirit ? How fondly the 
mind recalls images of happy Christ- 
mas Eves, when the home circle is com- 
plete and all are enjoying the warmth 
and cheer of a cozy room in the soft 
glow of the fire-light of the Yule logs 
on the hearth. While without the wind 
whistles about the corners of the house 
and the downy snow is wafted to the 
earth, now and then a gentle knocking 
is heard upi-n the window pane, 
as the cold frosty \\ind drives 
the flakes hither and thither. The 
heart is warmed n'lt only by the fire- 
light, the cheer of the holly, the mistle- 
toe, and the sparkling tree alone, but 
also by the spirit of this sublime season 
which is so significant of joy, p:ace, 
and love which convey such a depth 
of meaning to him who recognizes its 
sublimity. Ma\- this Christmas be to 
each and every one a season long to be 
remembered for its joy and blessed- 



Quite a few of our students attended 
the Lancaster County Institute and 
report having heard some excellent ad- 
dresses. 

Most of the students spent Thanks- 
giving in their homes. About a 
dozen remained, however, and spent 
their vacation very enjoyably on the 
Hill. 

Miss Inez Byers of Mechanicsburg, 
Pa., is spending the week on College 
Hill as the guest of Miss Laura Lan- 
dis. 

On the morning of November 2i, 
Elder J. H. Longenccker of Palmyra, 
Pa., conducted our devotional exer- 
cises in the chapel. 

Miss Linnie Dohner of Annville, Pa., 
has come to the College to assist in the 
duties of the culinary department. 

Among those of our number who 
took an active part in the Ministerial 
meeting at Middle Creek were : Dr. 
Reber, Professors Ober and Schlosser, 
and Brother Carper. 

Bro. Hornberger, who resides at the 
Brethren Home, Neffsville, Pa., is con- 
ducting a series of meetings in the 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Elizabethtpwn Church. We are glad 
to state that Mr. Frank Wise of the 
of the college was the first convert at 
these meetings. 

On Saturday evening, November 22, 
Miss Mary Elizabeth Miller, Teacher 
of Piano, gave a Piano Forte Recital 
in Music, Hall. The Prc.igram was as 
follows : 

Beethoven — Sonata, Op. 53. 

Wagner-Liszt — Sjjinning Chorus 
from "The Flying Dutchman." 

Luebert — Berceuse. 

Chopin — Etude, Op. 10, No. 5. 
(Black Keys.) 

Raff— Dance of the Dryads. 

Perry — Last Island. 

Liszt — Rhapsodic Hongroise, No. 6. 
, This program was rendered with 
great skill, especially since Miss Miller 
gave the entire program from memory. 

We are glad to welcome so many 
new friends into our school circle this 
term. 

Bef.rc tht 
two old mai 
holiday. 

"Sister Molly." said the younger, 
"would a long stocking hold all you'd 
want for a Christmas gift ?" 

"Xo, Elniira," said the elder, "but a 
pair of socks would." 

Dr. Maria Mnntessori, and Italian 
educator, undoubtedly one of the great- 
est women educators in history, will 
deliver an address in Philadcliihia on 
December g. Miss Myer and a few 
others anticipate liearing her. 

The friends of Mr. Orvillc Becker 
will regret to learn that he is obliged to 
discontinue his college work for the 
present on account of ill health. 

Miss Floy CroutJiamcl of Sondcrton, 



hre one Christmas eve, 
s were iilanning for the 



Pa., paid a visit to the College last 
week. 

Miss Oellig: "I can see Mr. M. all 
the time in the corner of my glasses." 
We believe that Miss O. does not only 
reserve a corner in her glasses for her 
special friends but also a comer in her 
heart. 

The music teachers are very much 
elated over the fact that there are so 
many students taking Piano and Voice 
this term. About thirty liave enrolled 
as voice pupils. 

The Temperance League of the Col- 
lege rendered a public program in the 
Chapel on Sunday morning. November 
23. A large audience listened to the 
interesting and helpful exercises of 
this so noble an organization. On the 
evening. of December 5, the members 
elected the following officers : 

Chairman. Prof. H. K. Ober. 
Vice-chairman, I. j. Kreider. 
Secretary. Mary Hershey. 

Treasurer. H. D. Mpyer.^ 

--.Qn_,the last Saturday evenin g aa~t fas 
>^er. Miss Nora Reber, Mr. C. J. Rose. 



>^^Program Committee, Miss Elizabeth 
Fall Term, the faculty and the stuJeiit 
body were delightfully ente-'ained by 
Professor and Mrs. Schlosser at a 
Lemon Social, in honor of the birthday 
anniversary of Mrs. S.'hlosscr. A'ar- 
ious games were played during the 
evening, which everybody enjoyed. Mr. 
Rose and Prof. Harley both won prizes 
in contests. Mr. Rose receiving a lemon 
into which had been placed a lemon 
stick, and Professor Harley a lemon 
custard. All did justice to the refresh- 
ments and the evening passed all too 
soon. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



Persons interested in the various oc- 
cupations : 

Pressing Ties, A. R. Burkhart. 

Speech-making, C. J. Rose. 

Hunting, Arthur Miller. 

Measuring Ditches, Miss. F. and Mr. 
i^eigler. 

Mgr. of E. C. Sl.ick and Poultry 
Farm, S. B. Dennis. 

Weather Predicting. Geo. Xeff 

Planning Vacation Trips, C. J. Rose. 

Quite a few interesting games of 
basket-hall have been played recently 
between the day and the boarding 
students. In the following game the 
day students were defeated hy a score 
26 — 14. 

Boarding Day 

N. Longeneckcr Forward S. Garber 
O. Harshberger Forw"d L. Falkenstein 
R. Landis Center E. Falkenstein 

A. Brubaker Guard E. Engle 

B. Perry Guard S. Risser 
The gentlemen have also played a 

number of exciting games. The game 
between the Mohawks and the Ath- 
letics was interesting. Score 12—6 in 
favor of the Mohawks. 

Mr. Miller: "Say, Mr. Burkhart what 
is the height of your ambition ?" 

Mr. B. : "I don't know exactly but I 
thing she comes to my shoulder." 

Mrs. Mabel Martin Wenger is the 
happy mother of four boys. The 
youngest, Melvin, is just three weeks 
old. Mrs. Wenger was a student at 
College during 1905 — '06. 

Mr. C. J. Rose is looking forward to 
Christmas with eager expectations : for, 
among his gifts he expects an ear- 
trnmi)et by which he will be able to 
hear and understand the jokes told in 
the dining room. 



Miss Myer received an announcement 
of the marriage of Miss .\. Louise Ma- 
thias, a former studend, to Mr. Wm. A. 
Hafifert. We extend to them our best 

wishes. 

The Bible Term Dailv Program 
Forenoon. 
8-y — Library Work or Study 
9:00— Chapel Exercises 

9 :20— The Teacher J. G. Royer 

10:00 — I Corinthians! continued) S. H. 

Hertzler 

10 :40--The Pupil D. C. Reber 

11:20 — Old Testament, Lydia Stauflfer 

Afternoon 
I :40— Xew Testament ... J. G. Royer 
2:20— The Sunday School, H. K. Ober 

3 :oo Missions J. M. Pittinger 

3:40 — ^'ocal IVIusic . . . Elizabetli Kline 

. Evening 
7:00 Song Service ... Elizabeth Kline 
7:15 Sermon J(ihn Calvin Bright 

Expenses 
I'.oarding and lodging for the ten days 
will be five dollars. For less than 
full term, sixty cents per day. Contri- 
butions from those not lodging at the 
College will be gratefully received to- 
wards defraying the expenses of the 
special teachers. Single meal tickets 
at the College dining room, twenty 
cents. Lodging per night, fifteen cents. 

Accommodations 

Only a limited amount of room is 
a\ailable for Bible Term students in 
the College building. Those prefer- 
ring to lodge at the College should 
apply at once, stating the day of their 
arrival and the length of their stay. 
.\ccounts for lodging and meals are to 
be .settled with II. K. Ober. Treasurer. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TLMES 



On arrival at the depot, take Witmer's 
hack for the College. Bring a Breth- 
ren Hymnal, Bible, Training the Sun- 
day School Teacher, towel, soap, and 
woolen blanket. (if the weather is very 
cold.) 

For further information, address D. 
C. Reber, President. 



K. L. S. Notes. 

The most interesting features of the 
program rendered on November sev- 
enth were: A recitation entitled "Little 
Orphan Annie," by Ruth Reber; a 
declamation entitled "Success," by 
Harry Neff ; and "Praise of Books," by 
Sara Shisler, E. G. Meyer, John Kuhns, 
and Irene Wise. 

On December fifth, George Cape- 
tanios gave an address ; Frank Carper 
and Albert Reber took part in an im- 
promptu debate on the question, Re- 
solved, That health is better than edu- 
cation : Ryntha Shelly recited "The 
Cynic" : a declamation was given by 
Jacob Gingrich : and a Piano Solo by 
Lila Shimp. 

Homerian News. 

At a late meeting Laura Landis, 
Elizabeth Miller, and Walter Eshle- 
man became mcn-.bers of this society. 
\\'e are again renewing a former cus- 
tiini which in\-ol\-es the rendition of a 



program at each private session. When 
we think of the few members at the 
beginning of the year, the reason is 
evident for not having these private 
programs sooner. They are of great 
value to earnest society workers and 
add interest to each meeting. 

On Friday evening, November 21 a 
short but interesting program was ren- 
dered in private session. The follow- 
ing constituted the program : 

Vocal Duet— Katherine Miller, Nora 
Reber. 

Reading from Burke's Conciliation 
Speech— C. J. Rose. 

Vocal Solo — Elizabeth Kline 

Reading— Out at Old Aunt Mary's, 
Katherine Miller. 

The following public program was 
also rendered in honor of Homer, after 
whom the Society is named: 

Invocation — Chaplain. 

Music — Vocal Solo — Elizabeth Kline 

Who was Homer ? — Nora Reber. 

Synopsis of the Iliad— Orville Becker 

Synopsis of the Odyssey — C. J. Rose. 

Music — Serenade — Elizabeth 
Miller. 

Where does Homer stand in the 
galary of the world's p ets ?- Lillian 
Falkenstein. 

The Characteristics of Homer's 
poetry— J. G. Meyer. 

Address — Speaker. 

Critic's Remarks. 

Adjournment. 




Hiram Eberly, '13, is employed as 
bookkeeper for the South Mountain 
Lumber Company, Lebanon, Pa. 

Fred Burgess, '12, is employed by 
the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway 
Company, as cashier at Raleigh, W. 
Va. 

Howard Price recently spent a few 
days in town. He is employed at 
present as stenographer by the Frick 
Clock Works, Waynesboro, Pa. 

C. ]\I. Neflf, '08, was lately elected a 
charter member of the Homerian Liter- 
ary Society. Mr. Nefif is holding a 
lucrative position at present with the 
Kreider Shoe Company, which com- 
pany has also employed in its office 
force, Minerva Stauffer, '05, Elizabeth 
Rrinser, Susan Miller, '07, Irene Wise, 
'12, and James Smith, '11. 

Invitations are out announcing the 
wedding of Miss Leah M. Sheaffer, '07. 
to Mr. Wm. Glasmire, '07, at her home 
in Bareville, Pa., on Wednesday De- 
cember 17, at 2 p. m. Both Mr. Glas- 
mire and Miss Sheafifer were teachers 
for some time at the college. 

Mrs. Lydia Buckwalter Heilman, '05, 
is very proud of her baby boy. Robert 
Edward, who is now three months old. 



Miss Emma Miller, writes her friends 
at the college that she is much inter- 
ested in mission work at 469 W. Sev- 
enth St., Winona, Minn. 



10, made 



lo graduated 
Preparatory 

for the sten- 



Miss Floy Crouthamel. 
short call at the college. 

Mr. Herbert Root wli 
last year in the College 
course, enrolled this fall 
ographic course. 

Mr. Orville Becker, a graduate of the 
English Scientific Course, and a stu- 
dent this year in the Pedagogical 
course had to stop his school work on 
account of his health. Mr. Becker and 
his mother expect to move to Colorado. 

Miss Jennie S. Miller, 09, was mar- 
ried to Mr. H. Augustus Via on the 
sixteenth of November at her home in 
E.phrata. Mr. and Mrs. \'ia now live 
at Moffatt's Creek, Va. 

Mr. Andrew C. Hollingcr. '10, and 
Miss Elmira R. Palmer were married 
at the home of the bride on the thir- 
teenth of November. .\ sumptuous 
dinner was served the guests. B. F. 

Waltz, '10, and L. \\'. Leiter, 
'09. served as ushers. Mr, and Mrs. 
Hollinger took a honeymoim trip to 



24 OUR COLLEGE TniES 

Washington, D. C, Huntingdon, Pa., Mr. L E. Oberholtzer, '05, entered 

and other points of interest. Yale this fall. 

Misses Grace and Blanche Rowe, '10, 
It IS also reported that Miss Maude ^^^ ^^^^-^^^ ^^ Bridgewater College this 
Sprinkle, '08, was married to Mr. Chas. j. 

Atkinson. ,, . ^ ., , , , 

Mr. Amos Geib, 09, entered the 

To all these newly married couples Sophomore class at Columbia Univer- 

we extend our best wishes. sity this fall. 





''X 




"If you cannot boost don't knock," 
migtit be a pretty good motto for all 
of us as critics. However, let us not 
forget that our best friends are those 
who not only give us credit for our 
good traits, but aho point out our 
weaknesses so that we may profit there- 
by. May the exchange editors there- 
fore openly and frankly tell what they 
think of us. 

In addition to the large number of 
Exchanges received in October we 
wish to acknowledge the following 
November exchanges: 

The Sunburian High, The Purple 
and Gold, The Delaware College Re- 
view, The Evangelical, The Optimist, . 
The Collegian, The Red and Black, 
High School Impressions, Shamokin 
H. S. Review, R. H. S. Courant, The 
Conwayan, The Narrator, The College 
Folio, The Dynamo, The Old School 
Red and Black, The Lafayette, The 
Normal Journal, Spice, Bulletin of Mc- 
Pherson College, College Life, The 
Blue and White, Purple and White. 
College Rays, Normal Quarterly, The 
Perkiomenite, The Amulet. 



The Optimist is very neatly arrang- 
ed. Read the article on "Education; 
Its True Ideal," which we are sure will 
enable you, if followed, to reach suc- 
cess by doing the hard thing and do- 
ing it all the time, ever having others 
as your watchword. 

Read "Temperance" in The Nar- 
rator. It ought to insiire you to play 
\our part in dethroning King Alcohol. 
The cut on the Thanksgiving number 
is very suggestive. 

The Albright Bulletin. Your dis- 
cussions and editorials are very in- 
structive. Ask your artist for a 
few suggestive cuts to place in your 
bulletin. It would change the monot- 
onous appearance of the inside of 3'our 
paper. 

The Palmerian. May the Palmera 
College enjoy its new name and be 
satisfied with nothing short of the 
meaning of palm ; namely, victory, con- 
tentment, and peace. Your paper has 
a fine beginning. May it keep up to 
its present standard and ever strive on- 
ward and upward. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



e BEE HIVE STORE 



For 

DRY GOODS 

and 
NOTIONS 

RAIN COATS 

and 
UMBRELLAS 



Shoes, Etc 
"Something New Every Day.' 




SWEATERS 
UNDERWEAR 
HOSIERY 
NECKWEAR 

and 
FANCY 

GOODS 

A. A. ABELE, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



CONDUCTED ON SANITARY PRIN- 
CIPLES IS THE 

RALPH GROSS 

Shaving Parlor 

Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. 
None Better. Few as Good. 

D. H. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN 

The baker who knows how. Phone or drop 

a postal. 



BISHOP'S STUDIO 

PHOTOS OF ALL STYLES 

FRAMING NEATLY EXECUTED 
Kodaks and Films for sale. Amateur 
Finishing Solicited. Work Guaranteed. 

Centre Square. 



LEO KOB 

Heating and 

Plumbing ; 

ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



The Pratt 
Teachers' Agency 

70 Fifth Avenue 
New York 

Receives calls at all seasons for col- 
lege and normal graduates, specialists 
and other teachers in colleges, public 
and private schools in all parts of the 
tountry. 

Advises parents about schools. 

WM. O. PRATT, Manager. 

Plain Suits Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats 

CANSMAN '3 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange St*. 
LANCASTER, PA. 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Athletic Goods 



Kodaks and supplies of all kinds al- 
ways on hand in the famous Eastman 
quality. Don't forget us when in need 
of supplies for in or out door sports. 

HARRY K. DORSHEIMER 

Exclusive agency for Hopewell Choc- 
olate Dainties. 

School Supplies. Cutlery 



Mention Our Collepe Times When Writing. 



llllliHIIIIIKIi::QIIII<BIIIIIIIIIIIBIIIttl 

G.Wm.REISNERI 

Manufacturing | 

Jeweler | 

College Jewelry of the Better Sort. | 

1 Class Pins and Rings, Prize Cups, Fra- | 

1 ternity Je\Aelry, Medals. = 

B Watches Diamonds Jewelry J 

1 120 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 1 



Franklin and Marshall 
Co lege, Lancaster, Pa. 

LANCASTER, PA. 
Offers liberal courses in 

ARTS and SCIENCES. 

Campus of fifty-four acres with ten 

buildings including Gymnasium and 

complete Athletic Field. 

For catalogue apply to 

HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 



CENTRAL 
MEAT- IVIARKE-^ 

All Kinds of Choice 

Fresh and Smoked Meats. 

H. H. GOOD, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



WE DO IT RIGHT 



Shoe Repairing 



F. T. MUTH 



S. K. BARNES & SON 



H. M. MUTH 



MUTH BROS. 



LUMBERo 

', Also all kinds of building material 
I and mill work, Slate and Cement, 
Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent 
Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board.etc. 
; COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 
'. We aim to give you a square deal 
I that will merit your trade and friend- 
\ ship. 

X ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

♦4 I J 4 Jt* ******< "l -*************< 



F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
H?P'IR VVORK ... 
Horseshoeing a Specialty. 
N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 

F. D. GROFF & BRO, 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



Carry 
This Pen 
Upside Down 



— if you want to. Yes, in any posi- 
tion, any pocket 

Boys: carry the Parker Jack Knife 
Pen in your trousers pocket along 



Play foolbaU wllh it. — basketball, 
tennis, hockey. It's on the job the 
minute you want to write, without 
Icavma a pinhead spot of mk any- 



Wri 



i:igine a pen 



across paperl That's the way it writes. 

Price $2.50 up. Get one on trial. 
Take it back any time wiLSin 10 
days if you're not tickled to death 
with it. We authorize dealer to re- 
fund. If your dealer doesn't carry 
Parkers, write us for catalof today. 

PARKER PEN COMPANY 

MiU St., Janesville, WU. 

PARKER 

Jadt Knife Safety 



28 Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 



Seven Reasons : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Grovi^ing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 



Elizabethtown College 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Mention Our Gillege Times When Writing. 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre Square, 

JACOB FISHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
With you for 35 years. THAT'S ALL 

I Lehman & Wolgemuth: 
I COAL 



* WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR + 

4 Telephone J 

s I 

t ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENN'A J 

r 1 1 = * 

FURNITURE 

F. C. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - • PENN'A 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



W. R. Ashenfelter \\ 

CHOICE BREAD AND 

CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied with > • 
Fancy Cakes at Short Notice. 



Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA 
■♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ I I II I I > . | i » 4i 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING. 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work guaranteed Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

URSINUS COLLEGE, Collegevllle, Pa. 

(24 miles from Philadelphia) 
Group system of instruction. University 
trained faculty. High standards of scholar- 
ship. Athletics encouraged hut controlled. 
No fraternites or exclusive clubs. Strong 
Christian influences. New doi'mitories and 
dining halls. Men and women admitted to 
all 



SUMMER SESSION 
Oldest and most inviting college summer 
school in Pennsylvania. College courses 
and preparatory studies. Teaching by heads 
of departments. I^arge shaded campus and 
cool buildings. Terms low. 
GEORGE LESLIE OMWAKE, Pd.D., Pres. 

ELIZABETHTOWN DENTAL PARLORS 
Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday. 
S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 
We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 

Y. M. C. A. BIdg., LANCASTER, PA. 



IH. 



H. BRANDT I 



I ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL | 

I SLATE and ROOFIt^G PAPER | 

I .. *,. I 

I I 

I ELIZABETHTOWN, PENN'A | 

i s 
aKiiauiiiaiiiiiiiniiKiaiiTuBii;a!:iiiiiii.B!:'':a;;.aui:i:::;:B::ai!i 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of iCour Patronage. 



W ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD 



$1.00 A YEAR 
Estimates on any kind of Job {"rinting. 



Linotyping for the Trade. 



J. N. OLVVEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday. 



JN'A i 



t ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENh 

DENTIST 

GEO. rt. KERSEY 
Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

A. W. CA5N 

store Adjoining Federal Room 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - - - PENN'A 

JOHN A. FISHER 

BARBER, 

Centre Square, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

iiiaHiiiHiiiBiiiiMi";iniiiiHiiiininniiiBii!iBiiiaiMi!ii!a'''iBiiiim 



The place to buy 
Stationery, Pennants, Souvenir Goods, Post 
Cards, and hundreds of articles for your 
pleasure and convenience. Our candies are 
always fresh. LAWRY'S VARIETY STORE, 
Half Block S. of Center Sq., Elizabethtown. 

Boggs Hardware Store 

The best there is in hardware at the 
iov«est possible prices. Prompt and cour- 
teous service. TRY US. 

D. B. KLINE 

CHOICE GROCERIES 



West High Street, 



AND PROVISIONS 
Elizabethto.vn, Pa. 



♦♦n 

FISHER I 



I JOS. H. RIDER & SON 



t CEO. A. 

I Hardware 

Phonographs 

And 

Records 

ELIZABETHTOWN, 



♦♦< »♦♦♦#♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 4 

t ELIZABETHTOWN 



I : ROLLER MILLS 



AGENCY FOR 

SPALDING'S 



I Baseballi Tennis Goods I 

I I 



llllliaillllHIIIHIIUBIIIIIHIIIII 



J J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

{ Manufacturer of Best Grades ol 

X FLOUR AND FEED 

{ Highest Cash Prices paid for grain. 

♦ bay and straw 

I ELIZABETHTOWN. - PEN>Cy 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»•»♦♦♦♦< 





Mention Our College Times When Writing. 


31 








J ■IIIIH 




'JBIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIIIil 



I The Book Store 



1 BOOKS, BIBLES, SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

I MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 

I G. N. FALKENSTEIN, Eiizabethtown Pa. 

i!iai>iiiiii;iiaiiiiiiiiiiiiriiii:;iHiiiiiaiiiyBin!BiiiiiBiii:aii!iiBiiiiHiiiHiiiiiBiiiiiBniiiaiiinBiiiniti!ia;iii:aiiiiB 



*************<¥***'t<-*'>'*i"i^*>**'> 







Seven thousand people buy WALK- J | 
OVER shoes every day — certainly 
there must be much merit in a shoe . ■ 
to attain such popularity — ■ 
In addition to the better quality ot 
our shoes we offer our better man- ■ ■ 
ner of serving you. 

WALK-OVER 

SHOE GTORE 

HUNTZBERGER- WINTERS CO. 

Department Store 
I; ELIZABETHTOWN, PENN'A 

*** n » #n ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ tiiii nmn 



MIESSE'S ICE CREAM 

adds ZEST to the MEAL 

Sold in Eiizabethtown by 

J. S. GROSS. 

ipaintinQ anb IPaper 
IbanGtng 

AMOS B. DRACE 

Spalding Sporting Goods 

Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 
Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic 
Shoes. Kodaks and Cameras, de- 
' veloping and finishing. 

H . B. H£ R R 
30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



tfw 


MMi 


p^H 


vmv^vm 


MVNii^VMi 


MWV> 








Est. I 


884 










Est. 1884 








KIRK 


JOHNSON 


ca, 


CO. 




Pi 


anos 


Player-Pianos, Victrolas, 


Sheet Music, 


Musical Mdse. 


: 


6-i8 W. King Street. 






LANCASTER, PA. i 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Elizabethtown Exchange 
Bank 



Transacts a general banking business. 

Pays interest on time deposits. 

Solicits your patronage. 



OFFICERS 



ALLEN A. COBLE, Vi:e. Pres, 



J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



DIRECTORS 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
H. J. Gish 



Jos. G. Heisey 
Dr. H. K. Blough 
Henry E. Landis 
E. E. Hernley 



J. H. Buch 
Dr. A. M. Kalbach 
Geo. D. Hoggs 
H. Greider 



TAKE YOUR 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morn- 
ing. Returns Wednesday & Friday afternoon 

Ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 
Catalogues a Specialty 



D. G. BR8NSER 

^ I Grain, Flour, Feed, 

I no I Seeds, Hay, Straw 
UUUI and Fertilizer. 

Bell & Ind. Phones 

Rheems, - - Pa. 



311 W. Grant St., 



LANCASTER, PA. 



O. N. HEISEY 



i 

I i 

■ Provisions, Groceries and Choice Candies i 

■ ■ 



IHEISEY BUILDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




0^'^f'V;. 



Ciiiitributions of Greece to Civilization 5 

Dr. Driver's Missionary Appeal 7 

The Influence of Christian Education 10 

Is There a Secret to Success? 11 

What's the Matter With Mexico? 12 

Two Ways of Spending Christmas 13 

Editorials 14 

Student Manhood 15 

School Notes 18 

Bible Term for 1914 19 

Resolutions of Sympathy 21 

K. L. S. Notes 22 

Momerian Notes 22 

Ahnnni 23 

Exchanges 25 



dur Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



HERTZLER'S 
Department Store 

Your needs supplied at satisfactory 
prices In Dry Goods, Grpceiies, Ready- 
to-Wear Clothing for Men and Women 
of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Flo .r Oil- 
cloth, Shoes, etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measuie 

CLOTHING 

-^JS^^^ES^ International Tailoring Co., N. Y. 

? ft-.-.vu. ^^^^^ American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chi- 

lli Q^l^ V^Stt Up-to-Date Samples on Hand. 

Hosiery hertzler bros. & co. 

Cemtre Square EHZabetlltOWn, PS, 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 

.,' ■■:■<>:'' t 

^- U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Elizabethtown National Bank 

^ Capital, Surplus and Profits, $164,000 

i 

General Accounts Solicited, Interest Paid on Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent, ' ' 

Dl.fl ECTO RS .1 ' ' t. 

W. S. Sniith Efmer W. Strickler Peter N. Ru^ 

F. W. Groff.- "■^'^ J. S. Risser B. L. Geyer ' 

E. C. Ginder Amos G. Coble E. E. Coble 




Mention Our College Times When Writing 



e i 

I BUCHANAN & YOUNG 



115 & 117 N. Queen St., 
LANCASTER, - PENN'A 

The New Season's 
Silks 

ARE READY 

The largest assortment of Silks in 
the City can be found at "The Store 
Famous for Silks." 

BLACK SILKS. 

Black Messaline, in a variety of 
prices and widths. Prices range, 50c., 
59c., 75c., $1.00, $1.25 to |1.50. 

Black Satin Ductless, with beauti- 
ful finish, very popular at present. 
Price range, 79c. to ?1.50. 

Black Taffeta, an excellent quality 
and in all the desirable widths. Price 
range, 50c. to $1.50. 

Black Peau de Sole, always popular 
as a dress material, because of its 
beautiful, close-woven surface. Prices, 
59c. to $1.50. 

Black Peau de Cygne, with a beauti- 
ful, lustrous finish. Prices, 75c. to 
$1.50. 

Black Charmeuse, just the thing for 
the present day dresses, because of its 
draping possibilities. These are of 
very excellent quality. Price $1.98. 

Black Crepe de Chine; this popular 
silk is being used at present more than 
ever. Prices, 75c. to $1.50. 

BLACK DRESS GOODS 

An excellent variety from which to 
make your selection. Here you will 
find all that is new and up-to-date, 
from the cheapest materials at 25c. a 
yard to the finest all-wool materials. 
We are ready to supply your needs for 
the Fall and Winter. 

IIIIIBIIIIHIHIIIIBIinBIIIIIBIIIIiBllllil 




Students Will Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



D. H. MARTBN 

Ready-rilade Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



r orth East Corner Centre Sqjare, 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JACOB FISHER 
Watchmcuker & Jeweler 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
With you tor 35 years. THAT'S ALL 

Lehman & Wolgemuth: 
COAL 

W-O.n, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR 

Telephone 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - • PENN'A 

FURNITURE 

F. C. FiSHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - - PENN'A 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



i W. R. Ashenfelter 

CHOICE BREAD AND 

CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied 'with 
Fancy Cakes at Short Notice. 

; S. Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA ] 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING. 

Rubber heels mal<e walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

URSINUS COLLEGE, Collegevllle, Pa. 

(24 miles from Philadelphia) 
Group system of instruction. University 
trained faculty. High standards of scholar- 
ship. Athletics encouraged but controlled. 
No fraternites or exclusive clubs. Strong 
Christian influences. New dormitories and 
dining halls. Men and women admitted to 
all courses. 

SUMMER SESSION 
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I ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 1 

I SLATE and ROOFING PAPER | 

I I 

I I 

I ELIZABETHTOWN, PENN'A a 



(§m OloUpgf ©trn^a 



ELizABuraTowM, Pa., Kebbuary, 1918 



Contributions of Greece to Civilization 



F. S. Carper. 



The power nr success (i a nation d jcs 
not depend upon its grandeur, prosper- 
ity, or wealth that it enjoyed v\hile in 
its glory, but upon its influence that it 
has exercised upon the subsequent na- 
tions of the . world. Greece for no 
great length of time in her history 
would measure up favorably with our 
present idea of world powers. 

Her various city-states were not all 
I united in the way that we deem neces- 
sary today to be worthy of the title of 
a world power, and yet Greece has 
wielded an influence upon the .world 
that the present nations can justly 
covet. Wie pride ourselves today with 
our excellent form of government, our 
literature, science, philosophy and neg- 
lect to pay the honor that is due the 
Greeks for taking the initiative. 

We are but building today on the 
foundaticn stones which were laid by 
the be-t minds that Greece could pro- 
duce. And we must remember the 
fact that the Athenian race was about 
as much above us as we are above the 
African negro. Surely ours is a good- 
ly heritage. 

Time has been very unkind to 
Greece, because many of her beautiful 
temples and statutes are now crum- 
bling into dust. Enemies have also 
burned many of her palaces and de- 



stroyed her beautiful cities, yet some 
relics- have been found, in recent years, 
by which we can trace some of her 
ancient beauty and genius. But these 
are not the contributions we endeavor 
to mention; the great contribution 'is 
the spirit that moved men to accom- 
plish what they undertook. 

If there is one contribution of great- 
er value than any other, it is their 
"love for liberty." We are sometimes 
called the liberty-loving Americans be- 
cause we have put into practice this 
characteristic contribution of Greece. 
The very thought of bondage, whether 
natural or spiritual, is repulsive to our 
nature. The Greeks manifested this 
same spirit by their- form of govern- 
ment. They had free discussion in 
which each one could defend his own 
cause without being bribed or being 
subject to a paid lawyer. They aimed 
to form a government that would fos- 
ter freedom, and so today our best 
form of government is an outgrowth 
of this spirit. 

Not only did they want freedom of 
government but they desired freedom 
of thought as well. The early Greek 
philosophers were endowed with this 
spirit. They longed to be free from 
the bondage of superstition and to ex- 
plore the unknown in the realm of 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



thought. They did not make such 
great progress in the various sciences 
and yet they laid the foundation for 
future philosophers. We today are 
carrying forth their work of freeing 
people from ignorance and unfounded 
beliefs with reference to the laws of 
science. 

While they greatly admired freedom, 
yet they had the power of controlling 
that liberty and of using it to serve 
their purpose. Demosthenes is an il- 
lustrious example of what a man can 
do when he truly purposes to win the 
mastery over his body and be free. It 
was this same characteristic love for 
liberty that produced the courage of 
the Greeks. What other nation has 
given us such an example af a coura- 
geous race in all the pages of history? 
It was this courage that enabled them 
to invent new ideas and thoughts, and 
consequently we have these highly 
prized contributions today. We have 
inherited our love for liberty from 
them and and are trying to give the 
American people all the liberty that is 
conducive to good or advisable to be 
given. 

Next to their love for liberty we 
prize their love for the beautiful. One 
of their first means of expression to 
this spirit was through architecture. 
They spent much of their time, money, 
and talent in beautifying their hea- 
then temples and public buildings. 

Examine many of tl•^e most beautiful 
buildings in our country at present 
and see how much of the Greek archi- 
tecture you can find. 

No other nation has yet exceeded the 
sculptors of Greece, hence they have 
given the models for our modern sculp- 
tors. In painting and in fresco they 



were not superior but paved the way 
for future painters to win honor. 

We cannot realize today how sad 
and gloomy our life would be, if we 
had not inherited this love for beauty. 
God has provided a way by which the 
aesthetic nature of man can be satisfied. 
He used the Greeks as his servants 
to revive this spirit and thus carry 
out his divine plan. Happy will be 
the day when modern civilization 
awakens to a full realization of the 
Greek sense of Beauty, and yet after 
all these beautiful things, Jebb says, 
"Their language was the most beauti- 
ful of all." 

We owe a debt of gratitude to the 
Greeks for their idea of a well-rounded 
education. They believed in intel- 
lectual, physical, social, ,'and moral 
education. In various ages the cry 
has been, "Starve the body and feed 
the soul." These fanatics seemed to 
think that a weak physical body was 
conducive to the growth of the soul. 
Such an idea was foreign to the Greeks. 
The Spartans were probably the fir.-^t 
to regard a physical education essential 
to both boys and girls. This idea 
has been revived recently, and modern 
educators are paying more attention 
to physical education. These Greek 
educators and philosophers, as living 
persons, have finished their work, but 
their systems of thought will never 
cease to attract and influence the best 
minds of the race. 

Even at the present time we ex- 
perience many things that wt never 
imagine were handed down to us from 
the Greeks. Go to the Southland and 
there you will find the old "black 
mammy" nursing the children of the 
wealthier class, the same as the "1 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Creek nurses of ancient i'imcS. 'Enter 
a nursery and listen tM> ^thc' nurse' in 
cliar£i^efri*li:ten}rg;' the cni'ldren b'j' 
telling iheni the oldCVrVek story of the 
■r.ugahoo." Watch the children play 
"hide and seek," a game wliich the 
Creek children played many centuries 
ago. Then visit a public school and 
there no doubt you may vvitnei-s the 
teacher giving a public demonstration 
'if an old Greek adage, "lie that is not 
Hogged cannot l)e taught." Did you 
v\er visit a barber sho]) ? If you did 
you no d nibt heard the same nonsen- 
■~ical conversation, that was such a 
menace to society in the barber shops 
of Greece. After visiting these various 
l>laces, y u will finally cimclude that 
we are all Creek, that "there is nothing 
that moves in the world trday that is 
not Crtek in origin, and though Egypt 
and Ual ylon gave us the garments of 



Ciyillzatiori, tlie Greeks gave' us " it's 
Spirit?' : • ', ' ■ . '^'' 

Can' if be 'possible that a heathen 
nation like Greece ccJiild contribute any 
evidence to Christianity ? Yes, .from 
some of these ancient Greek' phHoso- 
phers we have evidences of a 'living 
God, who was the '^li'pV^'A'e-'^liiy^of 
the uni\-erse, and fdrthermore they be- 
lieved that we should partake of His 
divine nature;* for Plato says, "We 
ought to become like God, as far as 
possible: and to becfeme Hke"H'itVi'i^ 
to become holy, and_ 'jx'i'sf,^ kiid-'Wisfe'.'''' 
Socrates believed in'^tRe^'^hiiVfcirt^l^t}' 
of the ■.soul. This testimony of a 
heathen nation to the proof of a living 
God should be the means of increasing 
our faith in Him. 

Greece as a strong nation has passed 
away, but may the' day ne\;er come 
when the peoples of tlif- ea''th '\Ci'll''n'6l 
realize her influence. ■-■::''.. 



Dr. Driver's Missionary Appeal 



Sara C. Shisler. 



On October 22, 1913, Dr. John 
Merritte Driver delivered a lectu.e in 
the Ct)llege Chapel in which he pre- 
sented the whole world in a condensed 
form in. the lipht of his own experi- 
ences. 

Dr. Driver was born in Virginia and 
is living in Chicago- at present. He 
has traveled through' eveyy country in 
the world, has been' a' student in the 
United States, France, Germany, 'and 
Italy, and has looked- into the faices of 
every kind of people. Then. his 
personality is strong and his pers Mial 



.,,,■) „..^| ....-.(n «^,,,, 

appearance gi\es evidence of perfect 
health. Of delivery and facial expres- 
sion he is master. His methods of 
holding attention are skilfully conceal- 
ed by his hidden hurnoT;-- --■.''• ■-'■■ 

The lecture was diVided '{hto-tlitee 
main divisions. 'They 'K'^re "'ttie'^'Js- 
sioii of the Jew, the Negro, and the 
Anglo-Saxon. His 'hypotheseis- was 
"Whenever the'. A'Imighty has a g:reat, 
peculiar, -sui generis- work to do, he 
Sdects; qualifies; and equips a peculiar 
sui -generis ag'ent to ^o -that: wdrk. '''''■ ' 

The first part of the lecture was the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



mission of the Jew. He says that the 
Jew was officially qualified to officially 
receive and officially give the official 
religion to all the peoples of all ages 
of all the nations of all the earth. 
Therefore, no other race could perform 
their work. Because the Jew is God's 
chosen race, who live according to the 
moral code, the Gentile will never be- 
come his equal. This moral code, 
given by a great Jew, Moses, consists 
of five divisions ; namely, sanitary, 
ethical, ethnical, ecclesiastical, and 
spiritual. He said, "The mission of 
the Jew is to stand beside his fellow- 
man and witness for the Bible, and in 
doing this he witnesses for by wit- 
nessing against. Furthermore, the 
greatest men that ever lived were Jews. 
Among them were: Abraham. Isaac, 
Jacob. Moses. David, and the greatest 
was Jesus Christ. 

Again some of the most wealthy 
and the greatest business men are 
Jews, even though their-mission is not 
to barter and trade. He referred to 
Benjamin Disraeli, the greatest states- 
man, who stirred the en-tire House of 
Parliament by his arguments. Again, 
Sara Bernhart, the greatest actress in 
the world, who moves the lowest men 
to tears, causes women to faint, and 
impressed Dr. Driver more than any 
other woman ever did. is a Jewess who 
acts in the play called, "Sappho." In 
this play she represents a beautiful 
voung girl who was seduced by an un- 
faithful lover. In it the most impres- 
sive part is when she, about to die of 
consumption, meets him on the street 
and speaks to him about God. ven- 
geance, retriliution, justice, denth. 
judgment, eternity, and the unquench- 
able fire. Likewise, in many other 



ways, the Jews are among the leaders. 

The Jew also lives better than any- 
body else in the country. He is to 
thrifty to go to the poor-house and too 
self-respecting to go to the peniten- 
tiary. After giving all the above to 
the world, the Jew has no country, no 
government, and no flag. 

So the negro also has a mission be- 
cause he is peculiarly fitted to do some 
work ; and to do his special work he 
should be educated in that channel 
in order to do it well. The speaker, 
whose mother died when he was an 
infant, does not look upon the negro 
with hatred; he was reared by a 
"mammy" whom he loved. She had a 
son about the age of Dr. Driver and 
with him Dr. Driver slept for many 
years. He said, "He was so black.— 
so black that he was invisible in the 
dark, and that his mother had to feed 
him on onions so as to find him in the 
dark. Now. the negro's color is no 
hindrance to his doing his part for 
which he is fitted; for, says he, "Act 
well your part for there the honor lies." 
Like the Jew. the negro has no country, 
no government, no flag. 

The last great division was the mis- 
sion of the Anglo-Saxon race. When 
he began he said. "Xow I'm going to 
talk about you. tell you where you 
come from, who you are, and where 
you are going — perhaps." He traced 
our ancestry from Japheth, King Thilip 
of Macedon. .Mexandcr the Grea'. and 
the Caesars. In Italy there are eighty 
statues of ,\nglo-Saxon ancestors, 
great kings or leaders. WTien looking 
at thrni a friend who was there the 
same lime Dr. Driver was. said, "These 
are the mm wos- blood is in your 
vcivs." lie al.'^o reminded u-^ that we 



I'j . 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



are indebted to the Jew for our relig- 
ion, Bible and Church. Attain, the 
Caesars who conquered the world 
gave Rome laws which rule the world 
today. He said,"All our laws are tucks, 
frills,ruffles and flounces to the Roman 
laws. The laws of Pennsylvania are 
not made in tlarrisburg b_v your mis- 
representatives." 

Again, intermarriage between white 
or negro, or negro and Jew, will cause 
the oflfspring of the third generation to 
be sterile. 

The most pathetic part of the lecture 
was the explanation that he gave to 
the Hindoo women who carried him 
in a jinrikisha when he traveled 
through India, about the equality of 
American women with men, and the 
welcome of a baby girl into the Ameri- 
can home. In this story that he told 
in reply to the many questions they 
asked, he described the joy of the pa- 
rents at the arrival of a baby girl, the 
care and attention given to it, the sor- 
row caused by its sickness, and the 
grief over its death. After he told them 
the different things that they wished 
to know, they answered, "Sahib, Sahib, 
incredible! incredible!" In this touch- 
ing story of his own experience, his 
sympathetic characteristic was promi- 
nent. He probably cultivated this 
trait to some extent, by caring so well 
for his invalid wife. 



He again said, "In all my travels 
I have nowhere received such mental 
illuminations as I have received from 
the New Testament." 

A humorous part, consisting of his 
experience with an Arabian prince, 
was very well rendered by the lecturer. 
He said that the prince, eager to give 
him a great gift, ofifered him any six 
of his thirty wives that Dr. Driver 
might choose. 

In addition to this, he said, " It is 
your mission to give language, law, and 
government to the heathen of the far 
East. God has heard the prayers and 
tears that have come before Him and 
God has resolved that deliverance shall 
come, and He is looking for a sui 
generis agent to perform this Hercu- 
lean task." 

Now the agent to do this is the 
British Empire pushing eastward and 
the American Republic pushing west- 
ward. Then said he, "They shall meet 
in the far East and join hands for the 
consummation.'" When that comes to 
pass he expects world peace. In con- 
clusion. Dr. Driver said, "When we 
meet, the great American Republic and 
the British Empire will" march under 
the banner of the Lord, and all people 
shall join hands and be one in blood, 
one in language, one in religion, one in 
aspiration, and one in destiny." 



The Influence of Christian Education 



Ella S. Hiestand. 



Of all the -knowledge the world pos- 
sesses there is nothing that has been so 
beneficial to mankind as Christian edu- 
cation. For Christian education refines 
the mind by making it perceive and 
take delight in the beautiful, true, and 
pure in nature, literature and art. At 
the same time. it embraces the power of 
cultivating and _ regulating the affec- 
tioiis of the heart. 

The development and progress of 
our nation is due to the influence of 
Christian education. It was this that 
caused its discovery, its birth, its 
growth, and its great attainments, and 
what it shall be in the future will be 
determined by the inhabitants taking 
advantage of this education. Its in- 
fluence will not have reached the cli- 
max before every sal-^on, every gam- 
bling den, and evcy house of vice is 
closed. Other countries of larger size, 
and greater possibilities are inferior 
because they do not have Christian 
education. Some of the?e have excel- 
lent educational facilities and even 
excel our own nation in some lines of 
training; such as, music, art, and 
mechanics, yet for want of Christian 
education they are n"it nrf-gressmg as 
the Christian nations. The difference 
between a Christian nation and a n'^n- 
Christian nation is very great. The 
Christian nations have pence-making 
and peace-loving people, and have a 
democratic government, thus giv- 
ing ajl ,ec|ual rights. Wonien, too, are 
on, ail equality, with men and in soipe 
states eiijoy ,all the liberties that man 



does. Children are honored, protected, 
and educated. But in nations where 
Christian Education is denied you will 
find tyrannical kings to rule the people, 
and high taxes to keep them poor. 
These poor are often oppressed to the 
extent of death. In these countries 
selfishness has control and so the 
stronger oppose the weaker; women 
are compelled to do most of the manual 
labor. \\'omen are married when they 
are children without their consent, and 
if they are unfortunate and become 
widows they are disgrrced and made so 
miserable that they often choose to die 
with their husbands. Children are born 
in disgrace and shame and are often 
strangled to death 1)y their father, es- 
pecially if it be a girl. All this misery 
is caused for want (^f Christian educa- 
tion. 

This Christian influence ought t > be 
felt in colIeL>^es and universities, but 
the alarmirg fact is that nnnv colleges 
are turning out infidels. This is prob- 
ably due to hieher criticism and lack of 
religii'us training. There are things 
that ?re hard to understand. But in 
such cases the Christian accepts truths 
by faith and the unbeliever becomes 
skeptical. 

The educated, with ut religious de- 
velopment, are daneerous; for it is 
these who become our great impostors 
and grafters. 

The church, too, has been greatly in- 
fluenced by Christian education. This 
influence ie increasing year by year and 
is in greater demand as the years roll 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



on. Just several decades ago there 
was little attention given to the need 
of educatiiin in the church, but since 
the church has turned to education it 
has made marked progress in reforms, 
in spirituality, and in missions. Since 
this awakening to the need of educa- 
tion, young people are coming into the 
church at a tender age and become its 
most active workers in the Sunday 
School. Christian ^^'orkers" Meetings, 
as well as in the diflferent lines of mis- 
sion work. Through this influence 
many have been inspired to give them- 
selves as a living sacrifice for the cause 



of Christ and the uplift of fallen hu- 
manity. 

The greatest institution that Chris- 
tian education influences is the home. 
What can be named that will raise the 
home to a higher standard than Chris- 
tian education? A home under its in- 
fluence will give its inmates joy. pleas- 
ure, comfort, and contentment that 
can not be found anywhere else. The 
father will be regarded as king, the 
mother as queen, and their children 
as jewels; all will have a deep interest 
in each other's welfare. The influence 
of a Christian home will never die but 
will live through eternity. 



Is There a Secret to Success ? 



RobertJ. Ziegler. 



Sometime ago I read of a person who 
had an old-fashioned writing desk that 
was given him by his grandfather. 
One day while sitting at this desk he 
accidentaly touched a secret spring and 
opened a small drawer. In this drawer 
he found a number of papers yellow 
with age. Upon examining them he 
found that one was a deed to a certain 
tract of land. He placed the deed into 
a lawyer's hands, and finally secured 
a piece of very valuable property. All 
that was needed was a mere touch of 
the spring and the treasure was laid to 
view. 

So it is with success. Somewhere 
there is a .secret spring,' ' a hiddeti 
powtr that 'must be foim'd- before the 
broad field of success is laid open be- 
fore us.. There is some force, soriie 
povveri some influence behind that- 
great f.c'd. This influence is the secret 



to success. It is the secret spring that 
opens the drawer of success. We do 
not always recognize it when we see it. 
We may pass it by unnoticed. Further- 
more it is not like the secret spring 
hidden in a place whefe it is difficult 
to find, but is open and plain where it 
is visible and available for all who wish 
for success. 

Moreover, this spring consists of 
three coils, each coil being an essential 
to success. The first essential "'trpoh 
which all of the other^ 'det)erid, is t'iir-! 
pose. At the bottom 'of' Wery binder- 
taking there is,— there must be,— a 
piirpose or \-lsion. If there is no vision 
there will be no undertaking, much l^ess 
any strides of aldVa'ncement. 

The'secorid c'oil is that wholly es- 
sential element: -ai. GmisecrationV What 
difh we accomplish Wthouf consecra- 
tion ? How much can we do if we 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



are not in the spirit of the work ? 
Look at Clara Barton. Hiow enthusi- 
astic she was in the founding and the 
directing of the Red Cross Society ! 
And so we might cite one example 
after another of the great things that 
have been done through the mist sin- 
cere consecration to a cause. "But," 
some one asks, "how may we conse- 
crate?" I would say by entering into 
the spirit of our work with our whole 
soul and mind. When we have a pur- 
pose in view, the next thing is conse- 
cration to that' purpose. 

Last of all there is another coil that 
is by no means the least. This is the 
coil of Tenacity. This word comes 
from the Latin "teneo," I hold. There- 
fore I would say that tenacity is the 



quality of holding fast to something. 
Not only must we have a purpose and 
be consecrated to that purpose, but we 
must also cling to it. We should hold 
on to it through rain or shine, joy or 
sorrow, calm or storm. Had it not 
been for the tenacity of Benjamin 
Franklin, Robert Morris, and many 
others, where would the great Ameri- 
can Republic be today? Had it not 
been for the tenacity of Martin Luther 
during the Dark Ages, where would 
all of our Protestant Churches be to- 
day? 

Thus, it is evident that there is a 
secret to success and that this secret 
is compounded of Purpose, Consecra- 
tion, and Tenacity, all of which are 
essential to success. 



What's the Matter With Mexico? 



C. J. Rose. 



In answering this qneftion, let us 
try to locate the main cause or causes 
for the dissatisfaction in this country. 
Every one is aware of the great fact 
that Mexico does not have the enlight- 
enment which some of the other na- 
tions cf the globe possess. In fact, 
her inhabitants as a whole are ignorant 
and are not. in the least, able to gov- 
ern themselves. As a result, it seems 
that the few leaders who are caoable 
of governing the country take advan- 
tage of the opportunity and all desire 
the leading power— the Presidency. 
Thus it is readily seen that those who 
are thirsty for this power, kee ) mat- 
ters in a constant state of turmoil in- 
stead of trying to establish peace. 

In the next place, the question might 



arise how these two factions in Mexico 
can keep up this continual fighting. 
Why are the sup]ilies not exhausted? 
Where do they get their money and 
their supplies? These questions are 
easily answered. At the present time 
there are two great oil cmi^anies in 
Mexico: the Pcarsi n and the Standard. 
The former seems to be in league with 
Huerta; the latter, with the Rebel 
forces. Xow it is very plain to every 
one that, if the forces of Huerta would 
be the victors, the Pearson Oil Com- 
pany would naturally increase its in- 
terests in Mexico from the fact that 
Huerta lias been receiving money from 
them and he. in return, would grant 
them first choice in extracting the kero- 
sene oil from the country. 



J 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



■ On the other hand, if the Rebel forces 
would be victorious, the Standard 
Oil Company would increase its inter- 
ests in the way similar to that of the 
other company. At one time the 
Standard Oil Company was debarred 
from Mexico and as a result they sup- 
plied Madcro with money to procure 
supplies and thus secure the reins of 
the government. Uut the Pearson Oil 
Company picked up Huerta and ever 



since that time the struggle has been 
waging. Furthermore, if it were not 
for the fact that the oil for battleships 
and General Huerta are closely relat- 
ed, there might be a different tale to 
tell concerning the immediate result 
in Mexico. But, since these two trusts 
control the affairs in this country, it 
will be a great problem for President 
Wilson and the United States govern- 
ment to bring about intervention. 



Two Ways of Spending Christ 



mas 



Frank S. Wise 



\ Christmas is celebrated by the mil- 

lions of people inhabiting the earth in 
nearly as many different ways. I shall 
try to picture in this short story two 
different ways of spending it. 

One person may celebrate it by hav- 
ing \\hat he calls 'a good time,"— in 
getting cl^riorsly drunk. He starts 
out ii the morni"g, meets a few 
friends, and warts to give them some 
Christmas cheer. He proceeds to do 
so by giving some liquor, and his 
friends naturally return the gift. After 
tneeting several of his so-called friends, 
and receiving as many Christmas 
gifts, he staggers out to some gambli;ig 
den. Here he meets more acquaint- 
ances who help to intoxicate him and 
then rob him of his money. Late at 
night he creeps home with an empty 
pocket b'^ok and a poor conception of 
how to celebrate Christmas. 

In contrast to this let us look into a 
home where Christmas is celebrated 



a family of four, composed of a father, 
mother, and two children. Early in 
the morning the children awake and 
dress hurriedly to see what their kind 
parents will give them. The boy finds 
a pair of skates, a sled, a pair of fur 
gloves, and a box of different kinds of 
nuts and candy. His sister finds a 
large doll, a carriage for it, and a nice 
doll's house. The parents look on in 
supreme joy while their children are 
enjo}'ing themselves, and think of the 
time when they were children. In the 
afternoa they go to see iheir friends, 
who are well pleased with the visit and 
do their best to entertain thepi. In 
the evening they go to church where 
they hear the old, old story of how the 
Christ was born, of how the angels 
sang and how He was crucified. After 
church they ro home and spend an 
evening which any king or queen 
might envy, and then go to bed, happy 
for having spent so joyous a day. 
differently. We shall suppose it to be 




EDITORIAL BOARD 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, Editor-in-Chief 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 



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Daisv P. Rider Art Editor 



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A Happy New Year to all ! 

Do not forget to attend the Bible 
Term which . opens January 14 and 
closed on January 24. A program that 
'will be of- interest to all has been ar- 
ranged. 



To the first students of the College 
and especially to those who sat under 
Brother Pitten^er's instruction, wc 
would say, "Corrite and give him a 

hearty reception." 



Elder J. G. Royer, one of our church 
fathers, will be here again this year. 
Will you ? 

On the evening that the Bible Term 
closes Dr. Byron C. Piatt will give a 
lecture on the subject, "\A^hen We 
Dead Awake." We hope every one 
will arrange to hear this lecture. 



We also desire to call attention to a 
Tcmi)erancc Lecture to be given in the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



Market Hnuse Audiloriiim by Mis. 
Mary Harris Armor, of Georgia. She 
has been one of the most active per- 
sons in the cause of Temperance in 
the South. She sometimes g ^es by 
the appellation, "The Georgia Whirl- 
wind," and is responsible for many dry 
spots in the South. This lectu e on 
the subject, "The St an' est Thi g ii 
the World," will be given Februa'-y 
r,^ at 8 p. m. 

Student Manhood 

.■\s we look at the develoimcnt of an 
organi--m, it is evident that there are 
two distinct f'Tces which p op' gate 
life: the negative forces and the posi- 
ti\-e forces. Just as no magnet is com- 
plete without two poles, the one of 
which is negative and the other posi- 
tive; as no month is truly real without 
rain and sunshine; as no day is com- 
plete without darkness and light ; as no 
country is natural without hills and 
valleys; so no life is p rfcct w!t':out 
sorrow and joy, sickne-s and hjal;h, 
despair and hope: nothing is wh^llj- 
real without being acted up^n by neg- 
ative and nrsitive forces. 

In another sense, everything, ii or- 
der to develop, must mak; a chiice 
between these negative and positive 
forces. The plant or the tree can not 
grow unless it selects the t^roper food 
from the earth and ri>-. It mu t re 
ject many sul stances found in bi'h 
and at the same time secure food ee- 
nients in both. The animal can not 
develop with- ut exercising a selection 
in its ivod. Many p'ants are poison- 
ous and must be avoided; others must 
be eaten in order to grow. Likewise, 
in the development of the human being 
discrimination must be exercised in 



the kind of food selected for his physi- 
cal, mental, and spiritual development. 
True manhood ccnsists of a choice 
between the lesser and the greater 
good ; it is a self-denial of what is in- 
jurious to a perfect development, and a 
positive consecration of one's talent ta 
the highest good of mankind 

Here, then it is clear that every one 
must make a choice in his school 
career, if he would receive the highest 
possible development. There wiH be 
some things from which he must re- 
frain and others in which he must be 
an active agent; this is temperance. 
Student life is a subtle mathematical 
problem embracing two fundamental 
operations: viz., subt acti( n ar.d ad- 
dition. To attain student manhood he 
must not only refrain from pernicious, 
practices but also engage in the prac- 
tice of the virtues which terd to mor- 
ality and spiritualit}-, both of which 
are essential to true manhood and re- 
ligion. '' 

One of the things a student must 
refrain from is the use cf profan'ty, 
which is despicable, and of slang,which 
is vulgar. Profane men as a rule do 
not have a large vocabulay, a fact 
which accounts for their outbursts of 
profanity. F. Mari 'n Crawford says, 
"Swearing is the refuge of those whose 
vocabulary is too limited to furnish 
them with a means of expressing arger 
or disappointment." Thus, there is 
no need of swearing on the part of a 
student if he exercis s care. Slang is 
a near relative of swearing whose 
source als:) is poverty of expres-i^n; 
it is used l;y students to the detriment 
of their vocabulary and their social 
standing. The mot've of slang is to 
give a vigorous expression : this is not 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



criticized. But , slang ,tso narrows a 
^'Ocabulary that the habitual user of 
slang finally crowds all his ideas into 
the few slang expressions he uses. 

These expressions change constantly 
so that they never come into good 
usage. Not only do they injure the 
virility of oral expression but these ex- 
pressions aro apt to get into the writ- 
ings of those who use them. Conse- 
quently, a student must refrain from 
both of these forms of expression if 
he would attain true manhood. 

We also desire to sound a note 
against the use of tobacco. Those who 
chew and smoke the weed know that 
it is an expensive habit. The amount 
spent in one year by the college stu- 
dents in America would assist thous- 
ands of young men and women of 
promise in securing an education. It 
is a filthy habit, and so decided is the 
traveling public against it that every 
Railroad Company has to attach 
special coaches to their trains for the 
filthy devotees of the weed. It is just, 
for no man ought to be allowed pro- 
misciously to pollute the air another 
has to breath, with the obnoxious odor 
of tobacco smoke. Then, too, no one 
with good common sense will deny 
that smoking and chewing tobacco 
are injurious to the physical, 
mental, and spiritual developments 
of any one. Scientists, and 

this point. Elizabethtown College 
stands firm on this question and does 
not allow the use of tobacco in its 
buildings or on its grounds. This may 
not be catering to the wants of young 
men, but we do believe it is catering 
to the needs of student manhood. 

We desire to say a few words ta the 
ladies of our institutions, and our land. 



We are informed that there are insti- 
tutions in America where ladies smoke 
the weed. This is a disgrace to these 
institutions and to American w:man- 
hood. If the women of our land would 
use the power they have, in the way of 
influence, the greater part of our 
smoking and drinking would be elimi- 
nated. If the ladies of our land would 
refuse the company of young men who 
use tobacco and liquor the question of 
intemperance would solve itself. May 
you resolve that the hand that takes 
the cigar or cigarette, and h ilds the 
rum glass shall never have yours. Such 
a course would make a min out of 
many brilliant students who otherwise 
become cigarette and rum fiends. ]May 
you never need to care for snch an un- 
fortunate person in your life. 

These are a few things which must 
be avoided by a young man who is 
striving to attain the full stature of 
student manhood. Since the above 
habits are despicable, vulgar, filthy, 
and injurious no one can lo-e by re- 
fraining from them, but will be abun- 
dantly rewarded. These evil hab'its 
sometimes crowd out the better things 
of life. We sympathize with those 
who are addicted to these habits, but 
wc are convinced that to continue in 
them is to make a failure of life. We 
even notice that some of our exchanges 
accept the advertisement of tobacco 
firms. C)n the same ground that many 
of our respectable newspapers have 
ousted the advertising of liquor estab- 
lishments and saloons, college papers 
ought to oust the tobacco advertise- 
ments. Many of the cuts in our ex- 
changes .savor of the "pipe and spit- 
toon :" this is noot indicative of the 
highest type of student manhood. May 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



pipe 1)C used for better purposes, and 
the spittoon eradicted from every 
private and every public building. 

This is the negative side of life. In 
our development we must reject that 
■which is not food for the body and the 
soul. By so doing our lives are made 
purer and rendered fit for the indwel- 
ling of the nobler virtues. No less im- 



portant is the positive side of life, but 
this must be left for a future issue. 
No less can a man be a Christian by 
simply refraining from evil, than a 
student attain true manhood by merely 
refraining from some bad habits. The 
test of character is not merely pro- 
fession, but possession 




5 



^0 



H 











t 



is 



What resolutions have you made for 
the coming year ? Have you resolved 
to smile whatever may come your way? 
Have you decided to help another when 
he is feeling "blue?" Have y ui made 
up your .mind to do yDur share if the 
^ work that is placed before you ? And 
last of all, have yc.u decided to try 
anew to live for Christ? 

These c|uestions may s lund im;)er- 
tinent, but just stop to think a moment 
about some of them. Have you in the 
past year alwaj's tried your best to ap- 
pear cheerful, even though discourage- 
ments and failures were coming your 
way. Do you realize how much a 
smile means? It may be the means 
of starting s me discouraged brother 
anew on his journey of life. 

Thm again, as you retlect over the 
past twelve months, have you always 
been v. illing to assun-ie your share of 
the work at hand? If not, what are 
you g''ing to do this year? We are 
so often willing to -^hift our resp msi- 
bility on some one else. If we can only 
ret thv u'^h. this, world by doing as 
littlct' as. poSi^ihle we are Irippy. I'.ut 



let us get to work and do our part, for 
what we do not do will remain forever 
undone. 

Let us get to work and make nine- 
teen hundred fourteen a banner year in 
our lives. Let us try to encoura.ge the 
down hearted-, do i ur share of work, 
and live a life for Christ, that when 
twelve m-^n'hs are past we may feel 
that we have done our duty. 

Judging by the smiling faces and 
the light hearts everyone must have 
enjoyed their vacation. We are surely 
glad to see all the old students back 
again. We are also glad to welcome 
Mr. Ephraim Hertzle", f-om Myers- 
town, into our midst. 

On Monday evening, December 15,. 
the Chorus Class rendered a Christmas 
nrogram in Music Hall. The program 
follows : 

Chorus— Joy to the World ; Hail the 
Blest Morn. Solo — A Cry Goes up in 
Rama, Kathryn Miller; Chorus— There 
Were .'^hei)herds: Solo— Out of the 
Deep, C. L. Martin ; Chorus — Stille- 
Xacht : Recitati n—Kec Mictions of a 
Christmas Tree, Mi.ss Mathiot ; Solo— 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



Away in a Manger, Miss Hoffman; 
■Chorus — Zirah; Herald Angels; Solo — 
In Thee O Lord, Miss Elizabeth Kline; 
Solo — W'eihnachtsklange, Mary Eliza- 
beth ililler; Chorus— We Have Seen 
His Star. 

Music Hall was filled to its utmost 
capacity and the program was very 
much appreciated by the audience. Es- 
pecial attention should be called to 
the solo by Miss Hoffman. Although 
Miss Hoffman is only a small girl, her 
solo was considered by many as one of 
the best numbers of the program. 

Miss Miller (in class) : Mr. Burk- 
hart, what does A. B. stand for ? 

Mr. Burkhart : After Christ. 

Quite a number of the students at- 
tended the Christmas program given 
l)y the Xewville Sunday School. Some 
of our students are doing a good work 
by going there Sundays to teach 
■classes. 

Do not forget about the Bible term, 
January 14 to 24. We are expecting 
to have splendid instruction and a large 
attendance. Look for the program in 
this issue. Read it and then you will 
be desirous of coming. 

On December 18 we had with us 
Prof. J. S. Illick from the Mount Alto 
Academy of Forestry. He gave an 
illustrated lecture on "The Present 
Management of the Forests in Pennsyl- 
vania." His lecture was interesting as 
well as instructive. However, there 
was not so lar,ge an attendance as there 
should have been. , 

"Is Bi'onson'sd forgetful a§ e\'ier?'' 
"More so. ^^'hy that fellow has to 
look himself up in the directory every 
tiight before he goes home from busi- 
■ness. Forgets his address," 



Professor Ober has just returned 
from Dalevitle, Virginia where he was 
doing some Sunday School work. 

Miss Stauffer spent her vacation 
visiting Misses Stayer and Replogle in 
Bedford County and Aiiss Shelley in 
Blair County. At the latter place she 
held a Bible Institute which was well 
attended. 

Mr. Replogle: "Miss Landis, do you 
know how George Washington spelled 
cat?" 

Miss Landis: "Xo I don't believe I 
do." 

Mr. Replogle : "C — a — t." 

It would be very well to take an air- 
ship ride with Mr. Herr for he would 
Landis (land us) safely. 

Professor Schlosser spent his Christ- 
mas vacation in Lebanon County hold- 
ing a series of meetings in the Tulpe- 
hocken Church. The' meetings were 
well attended and five persons stood 
for Christ. 

A number of the teachers and several 
of the students attended the wedding 
of Leah M. Sheaffer and William E. 
Glasmire at Barevill;e on December 17, 
1913. , ■ 

No one should fail to hear the lecture 
of Dr. Byron C. Piatt on January 24, 
1914 at 8 p. m. His subject is "When 
We Dead Awake." 

Professor Harley was called to 
Montgomery County on January i on 
business. ■ ,i , ,, 

The Temperance League is getting 
busy. Watch it. 

Bible Term for 1914. 
The Bible Term for 1914 promises to 
be one of the best ever held an Goll'egfe 
Hill. The morning sessions will be 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



opened by Elder J. G. Royer who will 
give some of his rich thoughts on "The 
Teacher." These lessons will be of 
special interest to those who instruct 
Teacher Training Classes, as well as to 
every church worker. Elder S. H. 
Hertzler will continue his exegetical 
work in I Corinthians. This will prove 
especially interesting to everybody who 
desires to be acquainted with the doc- 
trines and practices of the Christian 
Church, as handed down by the Apostle 
Paul. "The Pupil" and "The Old 
Testament" will be the subjects treat- 
ed by Dr. D. C. Reber and Sister 
Lydia Staufifer. These subjects, as well 
as the subject as.signed to Brother 
Royer, will be based upon the book 
written by The General Sunday School 
Board. This book, "Training the Sun- 
day School Teacher," should be 
brought along for study. 

In the afternoon Elder J. G. Royer 
will give instruction in the "Doctrines 
of the New Testament." This is an 
important subject and no minister of 
the gospel can give the best service to 
the church without acquainting himself 
with these doctrines. Brother H. K. 
Obcr will give some of his interesting 
talks on "The Sunday School." Every 
one who knows Brother Ober needs 
no pressing invitation to hear what 
he has to say. Our former teacher, 
Brother J. M. Pittenger, who has been 
in India since he left us, will be with us 
and give us some of his experiences on 
the mission field and also present the 
needs of the field. We are sure from 
what we have heard of Brother Pitten- 
ger while he was oti the field, that he 
will be a great inspiration to the Bible 
Term, .\fter this period Sister Eliza- 
beth Kline will give instruction in 
\'ocal Music. 



In the evening Elder John Calvin 
Bright, a member of The General Edu- 
cation Board, will conduct a series of 
evangelistic services. Brother Bright 
is a man of rich experience and we are 
sure his efforts will give us renewed 
zeal in the work of the church and be- 
the means of converting many souls 
for the M'aster. There will also be 
three special programs during the Bible 
Term as given in the program which 
follows. 

We hope that a large number of our 
brethren and sisters, as well as the 
friends and patrons of the school, will 
arrange to be with us on this occasion. 
Let us lay aside our earthly cares for 
a few days and feed our souls on the 
rich manna from the Lord's table. 
Come one, come all to the feast that 
is prepared. 

DAILY PROGRAM 

January 14 — 24 inclusive. 

FORENOON 

8-9 — Library Work or Study. 
9 :oo — Chapel Exercises. 
9 :20— The Teacher J. G. Royer 

10:00— I Cor. (cont'd) S. H. Hertzler 
io:40-The Pupil D. C. Reber 

1 1 :20 — Old Testament Lydia Stauflfcr 
AFTERNOON 
I :40— New Testament J. G. Royer 
2:20— The Sunday School H. K. Ober 
3:00— Missirns J. M. Pittinger 

3:40 — "Vocal Music Elizabeth Kline 

EVENING 
7:00 — Song Service Elizabeth Kline 
7:15 — Sermon John Calvin Bright 



EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

Saturday, Jan. 17, 2 P. M. 

Chairman Dr. D. C. Reber 

Invocation Eld. J. C. Bright 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



Music Chorus 

"The Religous Element of a National 

Education" Eld.J .G. Royer 

Song Audience 

Address Dr. H. J. Kline 

Franklin and Marshall College 
Chorus. 



TEMPERANCE PROGRAM 
Sunday, Jan. i8, 10:30 A. M. 

1. Devotional Exercises, 

J. W. Myer, Lancaster, Pa. 

2. Music 

3. Address by Pres. J. W. G. Hershey 

4. Music 

5. Recitation Mary Hershey 

6. Main Address Dr. George Hull 

7. Music, Down in the Licensed Saloon 

8. Round Table 

1. What Should be the Attitude of 
Every Member of the Church 
Towards Saloons and Drinking 
Places? 

Ammon Brubaker, Lebanon. Pa. 

2. What are the Evil Influences of 
Moving Picture Shows? 

I. W. Taylor, Neflsville, Pa. 
3. What Should Our Brethren and 
Sisters do for their Home Locali- 
ties on the Temperance Question ? 
Frank L. Reber, Richland, Pa. 



MINISTERIAL PROGRAM 

Saturday, Jan. 24. 

2:00 — 4:00 

Moderator — David Kilhefner 

1. Devotional Exercises S. S. Shearer. 

2. Hymn 

3. Words of Welcome D. C. Reber 

4. Discussion : — Give Practical Sug- 

gestions for Preparing a Sermon. 
J. H. Longenecker, R. P. Bucher 

5. Hymn 

6. Discussion: — The Minister's Work 
Between Sundays. 



Charles Baker, Jesse Zeigler. 
7. Round Table J. W. G. Hershey 

Jan. 24— Lecture: — "When We Dead 

Awake." ISyron C. Piatt nf Indiana 
EXPENSES 

Boarding and lodging for the ten 
days will be five dollars. For less than 
full term, sixty cents per day. Contri- 
butions from those not lodging at the 
College will be gratefully received and 
applied towards defraying the expenses 
of the special teachers. Single meal 
ticket at the College dining room, 
twenty cents. Lodging per night, 
fifteen cents. 

ACCOMMODATIONS 

Only a limited amount of room is 
available for Bible Term students in 
the College building. Those preferring 
to lodge at the College should apply at 
once, stating the day of their arrival 
and the length of their stay. Accounts 
for lodging and meals are to be settled 
with H. K. Ober, Treasurer. On ar- 
rival at the dep^t, take Witmer's hack 
for the College. Bring Brethren 
Hymnal, Bible, Training the S. S. 
Teacher, towel, soap and a woolen 
blanket (if the weather is very cold.) 

For further information, apply to 

D. C. REBER, President. 

Resolutions of Sympathy. 

Whereas: It hath pleased God in 
His infinite wisdom, by the Angel of 
Death, to call away from his earthly 
duties to his Eternal Home the father 
of our student C. ]. Rose, and of our 
Alumnus, L. D. Rose. Be it resolved: 

First. That since this home is bereft 
of a faithful father and husband, we 
commend the s Trowing ones to the 
kind Heavenly Father, who a'one can 
hind up the broken heaits, and wh<^ 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



doeth all things well. 

Second, That the Faculty and stu- 
dents of Elizabethtown College do 
hereby tender their heartfelt sympathy 
to the bereaved family. 

Third, That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the family, and that 
they be published in The Elizabeth- 
town Herald, The Elizabethtown 
Chronicle. Our College Times, and The 
\Mndber Era. 

Elizabeth Kline 

H. D. Meyer 

Elsie Stayer 

Committee. 

K. L. S. NOTES 

On December 12 an interesting pro- 
gram was dendered. Lila Shinip sang 
a solo entitled "Marguerite." Bertha 
Perry played a solo entitled "The 
Shepherd's Evening Song." An inter- 
esting debate followed on the question, 
Resolved, That the books we read exert 
a greater influence upon us than our 
associates. The affirmative speakers 
were : Anna Gislr and John Graham ; 
the negative, Ryntha Shelley and 
Harry Nefif. Many .short speeches 
were given in the general debate. They 
showed interest and preparation. John 
Kuhns gave an oration after which 
the Ladies' Quartette sang "Abide 
with Me." 

At a [private meeting held Saturday, 
January 3. the following officers were 
elected for the Keystone Literary So- 
ciety: President, H. D. Moyer ; Vice 
President, George Capetanios ; Secre- 
tary, Anna Brubaker; Critic, R. W. 
Schloser: Editor, Helen Oellig; 
Treasurer, David Markey ; Reporter, 
Frank. .S. •■ W'ise ; , Chorister, Bertha 
Perry: Recorder, Jilary Hershey. 

The Society can report a list of very 
?ritcresting program for the term. On 
Friday evening Dr; Reber gave an 
address on the Montossori System. 

HOMERIAN NEWS 

The student body js recognizing a 
sbitrce of iiiterest and a -development 
iV'the Homerlan ' Litera'ry Society. 
They await its programs with eager 



anticipation, and no one is ever dis- 
appointed with the performances. The 
program rendered Friday January 2, 
was a significant exponent of the work 
done in the past year and may serve 
as a suitable criterion for the new year. 
Every feature was marked by the de- 
termination of the performers to give 
their audience the best. The program 
committee in selecting a subject chose 
a very fitting one, one of interest to 
every admirer of enterprise and to 
every patriotic American ; viz.. The 
Panama Canal. Miss Gertrude Miller 
gave the early history of the Canal, re- 
counting facts from the t'me the pro- 
ject was first dreamed of to the close 
of the period of the French failure. 
Mr. L Z. Hackman then pictured very 
vividly the immensity of the work ac- 
complished by our government, men- 
tioning the amount of material exca- 
vated, fillings, locks, and their con- 
struction, figures, dimensions, and 
natural difficulties. The significance 
of the Canal was then portrayed by Mr. 
L J. Kreider. Besides stating that the 
Canal woufd greatly shorten shipping 
routes he predicted a marvelous de- 
velopment of the western coasts of the 
American continents. A question. 
Resolved, That the Panama Canal will 
be a greater water route than the 
strait of Gibraltar, was debated affir- 
mately by Mr. C. L. Martin and nega- 
tively by Mr. H. H. Nye. Both sides 
recognized that the trade of Northern 
Europe was the point most in question. 
Europe in considering, finds the Pana- 
ma route to the far East cheaper but 
the Gibraltar-Suez route more advan- 
tageous to p irt trade. The affirmative 
could simply make a survey of the 
possibilities of the nations c mcerned 
and predict the success of the Canal. 
The speaker however deducted logical 
conclusions and presented them de- 
cisively. The negative presented sta- 
tistics of the , trade passing through 
Gibraltar and assumed that this trade 
would be only slightly affected by the 
Panama route. The judges decided 
in favor of the negative. The music 
afforded diversion of interest. 




Blain Ober, 09, is employed as book- 
keeper with the Lancaster Blower and 
Fors^a' Company. 

Paul Landis, '09, has been h-ilding a 
position as stenographer in Philadel- 
phia since graduation. 

David Landis, "05, who formerly 
worked for the Hershey Chocolate 
Compan}-, is now employed by the 
Kreider Shce Company, as sh'pping 
clerk. 

One of our loyal alumni, Air. H. B. 
Rothrock, '07, forwarded his renewal 
for Our College Times from Elgin, 
Arizona, which in only forty miles from 
the Mexican border. Mr. Rothi-ock 
also states that he has been married 
since he left school. 

Francis Olwciler, 'lis Holmes Falken- 
stein, '10, and Edgar Diehm, '10, paid a 
short visit to the College during the 
last month. 

Isaiah Oberholtzcr. '05, conducted 
our chapel services on New Year's 
morning and afterwards addressed the 
school in a short talk. In his talk he 
brought out the necessity of laying 



a deep foundation as a preparation for 
life, and the time for doing it. 

Miss Kathryn Moyer, 'id, entered 
Oberlin College, last fall. Her sister, 
Sara Moyer, '12, is staying at her home 
in Lansdale, Pa. 

Andrew Hollinger, '10, representing 
The Aluminum Cooking Utensil Ct m- 
])any, cr.l'ed at the CoKege lately in 
his interest and had several of the stu- 
dents sign contracts to sell aluminum 
ware during the summer vacation. 

A. Mack Falkcnstein, '12. is doing 
office work in Waynesbori, Pa. 

The following item was taken from 
the Lancaster New Era : 

The home of Mr. and Airs. Hartin R. 
ShaefTer, of Bareville, was the scene 
of a simple, but pretty, wedding on 
Wednesday, December 17, at two 
o'clock, \\hen their daughter, Leah 
Myer, became the bride of William 
Elmer Glasmire, of Palmyra. The 
house had been tastefully decorated 
for the occasi'Mi with potted plants and 
white narcissus. The ceremony was 
performod by Elder Samuel Hertzler, 
of Elizrbethtown, underneath a bower 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



of ferns, palms, smilax and fragrant 
daphne, in the presence of nearly one 
hundred guests. The bride was simply 
attired in white silk and carried the 
handkerchief from her mother's trous- 
seau. Miss Agnes Ryan, of Brooklyn, 
was the bridesmaid, and Rev. Franklin 
Carper, of Palmyra, was best man. 
Robert J. Miller, of Philadelphia, and 
Richard W. Myer, of Bareville, acted 
as ushers. Misses Kathryn Miller and 
Elizabeth Kline, the head of the vocal 
department of Elizabethtown College, 
sang Mendelssohn's "Love Song," 
which was followed by Mendelssohn's 
A\' edding March, played by Miss Kline. 



Mr. and Mrs. Glasmire received many 
handsome gifts, including cut glass, 
china, silverware, linens and fine works 
of art. They will be at home to their 
friends after January 20 at Palmyra, 
Pa. 

We also learned that Mr. Allen 
Hertzler, '05, was married to Miss Bes- 
sie Baker on January i, 1914, by Rev. 
Harvey Hershey, of Landisville, Pa. 
The couple took a wedding trip to 
\\' ashington, and other places of inter- 
est in the South. They will be at home 
to their friends after May i, in Eliza- 
bethtown. 




Fellow workers in the cause of edu- 
cation. As we now have entered upon 
another year and as we know that 
some things may be made better, let 
us follow our work diligently and let 
us never be satisfied until we have 
found that something mentioned in 
Kipling's verse: 

"Something hidden. Go and find it. 

Go and look behind the ranges- 
Something lost behind the ranges. 

Lost and waiting for you. Go." 

Wie gratefully acknowledye the large 
number of December exchanges. We 
shall not name them all in this issue 
but we wish to say that some have 
been somewhat delin(|uent. 

The Amulet, of West Chester, taken 



as a whole is very interesting. The 
prize stories add considerably to the 
literary influence of your paper. 

The Christmas as well as the New 
Year spirit is well brought lUt in 
the literary department of High School 
Impressions, of Scranton. Your paper 
is attractive and you may be proud of 
your exchange department. 

The College Folio of Allentown. We 
like the originality of your articles. 
To your good literary work add a few 
locals, jokes, and the like because it 
renders your paper more versatile. A 
Table of Contents might be a new 
item in your college news. Otherwise, 
we look upon it as a neatly arranged 
and ,at the same time, a very instruc- 
tive paper. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



^ BEE HIVE STORE 



\ DRY GOODS 

( ■■^y and' 
i NOTIONS ' 

RAIN COATS 

and 
UMBRELLAS 



ay*? ^ 




Shoes, Etc 



-^^Stfe 



"Something 'pf.evs?' Every Day." 

CONDUCTED ON SANITARY PRIN- 
CIPLES 13 THE 

RALPH G lOSS 

Shaving Parlor 

Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. 
' ! ?;.0j None Better. Few as Good. 

• D. H BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN 

The baker who knows how. Phone or drop 

a postal. 



iBlSHOP'S STUDIO 

' 'photos b'F all: styles 

; 'FRAmNG neatly EXECUTED 
Kodaks and Films for sale. Amateur 
Finishing Solicited. Work Guaranteed. 

Centre Square. 



SWEATERS 
UNDERWEAR 
HOSIERY 
NECKWEAR 

and 
FANCY 
^ -=^^ GOODS 

A. A. ABELE, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

The Pratb 
Teachers' Agency 

70 Fifth Avenue 
New York 

Receives calls at all seasons for col- 
lege and normal graduates, specialists 
and other teachers in co leges, public 
and private schools in all parts of the 
country. 

Advises parents about tchools. 

WM. O. PRATT, Manager. 
Plain Suits Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats 

CANSMAN'3 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange Sts. 
LANCASTER, PA. 



LEO KOB 

: Heating and 

Plumbing ; 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

>*< M| ' i n ■!■♦ * ♦ I"> * 4"H I " I « I 1 1 * ><»♦ ♦ ♦ 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Athletic Goods 



Kodaks and supplies of all kinds al- 
ways on band in the famous Eastman 
quality. Don't forget us when in need 
of supplies for in or out door sports. 

HARRY K. DORSHEIMER 

E.xclusive agency for Hopewell Choc- 
olate Dainties. 



School Supplies. 



Cutlery 





Mention Our Collcgt 


Times 


When Writing. 27 




1 




^ Franklin and Marshall \ 
^ College, Lancaster, Pa. / 




G.Wni.REISNERi 


i Manufacturing 


7 LANCASTER, PA. / 


i Jeweler 


/ Offers liberal courses in ) 


B College Jewelry of the Better Sort. 


i ARTS and SCIENCES. J 


B Class Pins and Rings, Prize Cups, Fra- 


1 Campus of fifty-four acres with ten ^ ' 


j ternity Jewelry, Medals. 


: S buildings including Gymnasium and ' i 


■ Watches Diamonds Jewelry 


S complete Athletic Field. 


i 120 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 


i For catalogue apply to ', 
< HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pres. < 


Z^-v^W>— ^/Wx^^^^^WX^^) 


CENTRAL 


F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAH 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 


MEAT MARKET 


REPAIR WORK .... 


All Kinds of Choice 


Horseshoeing a Specialty. 


Fresh and Smoked Meats. 


N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 


H. H. GOOD, Elizabethtown, Pa. 








F. D. GROFF St. BRO. 

Meat Market 


WE DO IT RIGHT 


Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES & SON 


NORTH MARKST ST. 












Carry A 
This Pen 1 








; F. T. MUTH H. M. MUTH ; 






MUTH BROS. 




Upside Down M 








5 yOT ,v„( ,„. Ym, k an7 poii- ^^^3 




1 Dealers in 




'"l^r^ dU P«t«J.cl Knif,: m^ 




1 




P« k T»r »««, pocU Jo-. W&ll 




LUMBER^ 








1 ' 




tenni,, lltxrW. It'. ^ A. iob ihe miM 




Also all kinds of building material ! 




leivms D phihesd tpo* o< ink Mr- j^t^ 








where it haj been earned. B^^^ 




and mill work, Slate and Cement, ; 












8U« Ih.Vmehfto'brM y'ou'JSe it ^^^ 




Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent ' 




•cross peperl That •tliewtyitwritM. p£^^ 
Price $2. 50 up, Ge< one on trial. IMT/ZM^ 




Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board.etc. ! 




Tate it back any ti.-ne within 10 ^^J^ 








>wSit. *We'lu"thorke dealS to"1e- ^f(^ 




; COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. ; 




fund. If your dealer do«n-t carry |0! Ilil 








Parkert, write us for catalog loja/,. |¥Ax3 




1 We aim to give you a square deal ! 




PARKER PEN COMPANY ^l\^ 








Mill St.. JanesTille, WU. ^fij^ 


■ 


that will merit your trade and frlend- 






; ship. ; 




PARKER W 




1 


I 


Jack Knife Safety ff^^.'J 




; LLIZABETHTOWN, PA. j 


1 
i 


FOUNTAIN PEN "^0^'" 



28 Our Advertiser^ are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



1913 



IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 



Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

Seven Reasons : 

Efficient . Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 



Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



IMPORTANT! STUDENTS! I 



»*^lb»— *»^/b " *■ ^/ b * —^I b ' M « ^ /b' » «Vb*'*'Vb** 



t 



DO YOU KNOW THAT 

It is only because of the Wind patronage of our business and 
our professional men in this town and elsewhere, that this maga- 
zine exists. They have indeed shown themselves friends of Our 
College and of "Our College Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to 
buy anything, to consider first those who by their advertising 
have made this magazine possible. 

We have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all 
respects. 

Business Manager xif "Our College Times." 

nVb*" ^■■ V U* " — "W" ** ^" *"V b ** M"* ^" m ^/tfr 'f^/l^iii M^/V*'««*>/Ut 

READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



Qi<I A » i* < *^<^ — ■ « ^ IA>«« n rfK^J^Ma^ll^w i ^U ^W i n ^lWll I ■< A >«*i«i^<W*»«»^ l ^* p y 



First Showing | 

OF THE NEW | 

Fall Shoes! 



Every Style — every wanted 
Leather— every new shape 
— is here, ready for your In- 
spection. Will you stop in 
to see them today ? 

LYNCH & EBY 

"No Shoes Over 83.00" 

24 North Queen St., 
LANCASTER, - PEN 



ADVERTISE 



'OUR COLLEGE TIMES' 



♦ <"! ' 1 1 1 m 1 nH"i"H 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 ** * 



30 



Our Advertisers arc Worthy of 3four Patronage. 



m ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD 

$1.00 A YEAR 
Estimates on any kind of Job Printing. Linotyping for the Trade. 



;J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



; Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'A 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦» « I M l < ♦ < < I tK < ■<■ < ■♦♦ * 



DENTIST 

GEO. R. KERSEY 
Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. W. CAIN 

store Adjoining Federal Room 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - - - PENN'A 

JOHN A. FISHER 

BARBER 

Centre Square, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



iiiiiiaiii:ii".iBiiiiiBi!iiHn::iiiaiiiiiai!iiiaiiii:B!!ii!B'.'iBi:Nin 



I JOS. H. RIDER & SON | 



AGENCY FOR 

SPALDING'S 



■ 

■ 

I 

I Baseball! Tennis Goods! 

I ■ 



The place to buy 
Stationery, Pennants, Souvenir Goods, Post 
Cards, and hundreds of articles for your 
pleasure and convenience. Our candles are 
always fresh. LAWRY'S VARIETY STORE,. 
Half Block S. of Center Sq., Elizabethtown. 



Boggs Hardware Store 

The best there is in hardware at the 
lowest possible prices. Prompt and cour^ 
teous service. TRY US. 

D. B. KLINE 

CHOICE GROCERIES 



WMt High Street, 



AND PROVISIONS 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



FISHER 



CEO. A. 

Hardware 

Phonographs 



Records 

ELIZABETHTOWN, 



1 ♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades oJ 

FLOUR AMD FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for (frain, 

bay and straw 

EIJZABETHTOWN. - PENNA. 



Mention Our College Times When Wjitin 



'fe^ 



31 



^m- 



I The Book Store i 

I ..,.,.„.„. ..^„.;...„...,| 

1 BOOKS, BIBLES, SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPgui^S . ;,'i /( 1 

J MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED I 

I G N. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. | 

<iiiiai'ini/iiBiiiiiBii:iai:i:Hi!i'!ii!!a'i!iiniiiiiiiiiHiKsiiiai!iiiiiiiiiBiiiiniiiiK:K 



1 

I 
iiiniini 




Seven thousand people buy WALK- T 

OVER shoes every day— certainly ♦ 

there must be much merit in a shoe 4. 

to attain such popularity — J 

In addition to the better quality ot ♦ 

our shoes we offer our better man- 4> 

ner of serving you. J 

WALK-OVER * 

SHOE GTORE % 

HUNTZBERGER-WINTERS CO. | 

Department Store % 

I- ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'A t 

U*H ' H ' l"H"H"l ' > * ' > ♦' > I * H 1 1 1 1 1 1 K 



MIESSE'S iCE CREAM 

adds ZEST tp(,.^h,^.JVlEAVr,i-j-; | 

Sold in Elizabethtpwn bv A 

J. S. GROSS. - 

paintiiiG an^ jPaper 
Ibanoing 

AMOS B. DRA^E 

Spalding Sporting Goods I 

Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, % 

Golf, Gymnasium* "Outfits," "■'AtKretl't || 

Shoes. Kodaks and ..Cameras, de- ♦ 

veloping and finisKlrt'cf. '- % 

H . B. HE RR * 

30-32 West King Street | 

LANCASTER, PA. .t 



mm^m v tmi 



im 



i0m0Hmmm immm» 0m i mm ^^ktm 



Est. 1884 Est. 1884 

KIRK JOHNSON CBb CO. 

Pianos, Player-Pianos, Victrolas, Sheet Mu^c, Musical Mdse. 
16-18 W. King Street. LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Elizabethtown Exchange 
Bank 



Transacts a general banking business. 

Pays interest on time deposits. 

Solicits your patronage. 



OFFICERS 



A. G. HEISEY, President. 



ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice. Pres. 



J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 









Di RECTORS 








A. G. Heisey 






Jos. G. Heisey 






J. H. Buch 


Allen A. Coble 






Dr. H. K. Blough 






Dr. A. M. Kalbach 


H. J. Gish 






Henry E. Landis 






Geo. D. Boggs 




E. 


E 


Hernley 


B. 


H 


Greider 



TAKE YOUR 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morn- 
ing. Returns Wednesday & Friday afternoon 

Ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 
Catalogues a Specialty 



D. G. BRINSER 



Coal 



Grain, Flour, Feed, 
Seeds, Hay, Straw 
and Fertilizer. 



311 W. Grant St., 



LANCASTER, PA. 




iniiiaiiiiiBiiiiiaiiiiiBiiiiiiiiniaiiiiiniiiiBiHiiiimiBinnBiiiiiiiiiiiBni^ 



j O. N. HEISEY I 

I i 

I Provisions, Groceries and Choice Candies I 



IHEISEY BUILDING 

I 

iMiaiiiiia ■isaBiiiiiBiiiiBiiiiiBiiiiii 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




O^TC^ 



Tlie ^Mistake of the Judge 5 

The Tragical End of Donald I.iither 7 

Conquest 'Without War 'o 

The Call of Joan of Arc 12 

Egypt's Contributions to Civilization 13 

Editorials 17 

The Ordeal of Richard Feverel 

School Notes 20 

K. L. S. Notes 21 

Homerian Notes 21 

Spring Term 22 

Bible Term 23 

unini 24 

r~xchanges 25 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 




Black Cat 
Hosiery 



HERTZLER'S 
Departmsnt Store 

Your ueeds supplied at satisfactory 
prices in Dry Goods, Groceries, Ready- 
to-Wear Clothing lor Men and Womeu 
of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Flosr Oil- 
cloth, Shoes, etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 

CLOTHING 

International Tailorin? Co., N. Y. 

American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chi- 
cago. 
Up-to-Date Samples on Hand. 

HERTZLER BROS. & CO. 

Centre Square EliZabethtOWO, PS. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 



U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Eiizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits, $164,000 



General Accounts Solicited. Interest Paid on Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent. 

DIRECTORS 



W. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strickler 


Peter N. Rutt 


F. W. Oroff. 


J. S. Risser 


B. L. Geyer 


E. 0. Ginder 


Amos G. Coble 


E. H. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



BUCHANAN & YOUNG | 

115 & 117 N. Queen St., | 

LANCASTER, - PENN'A i 

I 

The New Season's | 
Silks I 

ARE READY | 

I 
The largest assortment of Silks in ~ 

the City can be found at "The Store = 

Famous for Silks." = 

BLACK SILKS. | 

Black Messaline, in a variety of | 

prices and widttis. Prices range, 50c., | 

59c., 75c., $1.00, $1.25 to $1.50. | 

Black Satin Ducliess, with beauti- S 

fill finish, very popular at present, e 

Price range, 79c. to $1.50. " 

Black Taffeta, an excellent quality ■ 

and in all the desirable widths. Price | 

range, 50c. to $1.50. ^ 

Black Peau de Sole, always popular s 

as a dress material, because of its B 

beautiful, close-woven surface. Prices, g 

59c. to $1.50. I 

Black Peau de Cygne, with a beauti- I 

ful, lustrous finish. Prices, 75c. to ■ 

$1.50. I 

Black Charmeuse, just the thing for g 

the present day dresses, because of its = 

draping possibilities. These are of B 

very excellent quality. Price $1.98. | 

Black Crepe de Chine; this popular | 

silk is being used at present more than g 

ever. Prices, 75c. to $1.50. = 



BLACK DRESS GOODS 

An excellent variety from which to 
make your selection. Here you will 
find all that is new and up-to-date, 
from the cheapest materials at 25c. a 
yard to the finest all-wool materials. 
We are ready to supply your needs for 
the Fa'l and Winter. 

iiiiiv w 3 «■• 





/v^^/^^*«v^^^^v^ 




► i 
y When You Come to ^ 




► Lancaster to Buy i 




I Clothing \ 




> i 

► FOR r.lEN, BOYS OR i 




> CHILDREN ^ 




' It will pay you to visit * 




: Hirsh & Bro. ; 




Centre Square, Next to City Hall 




. LANCASTER, PA. . 


i 


* There since 1854 and the only ^ 

► clothing house in Lancaster that ^ 

► has one price to all and dis- i 
^ counts to none. i 


< 


► i 
^ READY-TO-WEAR ^ 




^ AND i 




► MADE-TO-ORDER i 


M 


► CLOTHING i 




^ Men's and Boys' ^ 




I FURNISHINGS \ 


^ 


► We Are Among the Largest Man- < 

► facturers of i 




I Plain Suits J 




^ AND OVERCOATS and BROAD- ^ 


> 


^ FALL PANTS ^ 




in this country. 


J 


^ See Our All-Wool Suits at ^ 


\ 


^ ♦12.00, $13.rn, $14.00 and $15.00 ^ 



Students Will Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



IMPORTANT ! STUDENTS ! 



DO YOU KNOW THAT 

It is only because of the kind patronage of our business and 
our professional men in this town and elsewhere, that this maga- 
zine exists. They have indeed shown themselves friends of Our 
College and of "Our College Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to 
buy anything, to consider first those who by their advertising 
have made this magazine possible. 

We have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all 
respects. 

Business Manager of "Our College Times." 

READ THE AL.VERTISFIVIENTS f 



»•*♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦ •H"!44'4>4>4>+4>4"H>Mm|>4"M>I> 



First Showing | 

OF THE NEW j 

Fall Shoes! 

I 

Every Style — every wanted | 

Leather — every new shape | 

— is here, ready for your in- ~ 

spection. Will you stop in 
to see them today 7 

LYNCH & EBY 

"No Shoes Over 83.00" 

24 North Queen St., 

LANCASTER, - PENN'A 



ADVERTISE 



'OUR COLLEGE TIMES' 



■ n > H - H -4 -H 1 1 1 1 1 1 >♦ I n 1 1 1 »» » 



(§m doUfgf (TtmfB 



Elizabbthtown, Pa., February, 1914 



The Mistake of the Judge 



Ruth C. Landi 



In a -mall \illage near one of our 
large cities, lived a young music teach- 
er. }le was a j;oor lioy, but was pos- 
sessed of an unusual talent in his pro- 
fession, which talent was recognized 
by the music-h-ving people of the city 
near which he lived. He taught in 
mar.y hemes among the richer class of 
people, but he enjoyed his work m ist 
at the home of the Judge. The reason 
for this preference was the fact that 
the Judge had a very charming daugh- 
ter of eighteen whom he was giving 
musical instruction. 

As time went on the music teacher 
began to realize that he loved Edith, 
the Judge's daughter. She, too, had 
admitted to herself that Joe, as she 
called him, was an admirable young 
man and that she looked forward to 
his coming with unusual pleasure. 
Both Joe and Edith never passed one 
remark while they were together, for 
an liiiur or two, that might have led 
to the thciught that they loved each 
other. 

One day when Joe had come to give 
Edith her lesson, he could no longer 
refrain from telling her of his love for 
her. He was not aware at the time of 
the presence of the Judge. Just as 
he finished his speech to Edith, the 
Judge stepped out from behind a cur- 



tain. Anger and indignation were 
written on his countenance. 

"Ah, yes!" he said, "so you are the 
young man of whom Edith has been 
talking and dreaming about for the 
last few months. I have been wait- 
ing a long time to entrap this nuisance 
and now I have succeeded at last." 

The Judge was about to strike Joe, 
when Edith lifted a very much flush- 
ed face to her father and said in a 
trembling voice, "Father don't, oh, 
don't strike him, for I love him, I love 
him." 

"Leave the house at once and never 
put your foot inside this house again," 
thundered the Judge angrily. "You, a 
poor music teacher, asking my fair 
daughter to marry a wretch like you. 
I say, go at once." 

Poor Joe, with a very, very sad and 
bruised heart left the house from 
which he had departed many times 
Ijefore with a merry, gay, and joyful 
feeling in his breast. He turned 
around just as he closed the door and 
saw Edith lying prostrate in her fath- 
er's arms. A feeling of bitterness 
arose within him and with a vow in 
his heart that sometime, sooner or 
later, he would come back and claim 
her as his bride, he walked slowly, 
very slowly down the street. When 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



he came to his small home it seemed 
as though he would become over- 
whelmed with grief. He gave vent to 
his intense feelings by pacing to and 
fro in the room and crying out aloud, 
"How can I endure it all!" 

Just at the moment of one of these 
outbursts of sorrow, the door opened 
quietly. Joe did not notice it. Soon 
he heard a low moan back of him. 
He turned, and there was Edith stand- 
ing, very pale and sad-looking. He 
He sprang forward to her, but she ap- 
peared to resist him. "No Joe," she 
said, " papa says I may never marry a 
poor man like you, but that I must 
marry Harry Smith, who is wealthy, 
and I just came over to tell you that I 
love you more than anybody else, but 
that I dare not disobey father. Good- 
bye, Joe." 

She turned to leave, but Joe called 
to her and said, "Only one minute, 
Edith. I know I am a poor man 
now, but I am going away and will 
make a fortune in the West. I hope 
that God will help me make good, and 
that he will bless you and protect you 
while I am gone, and then some day 
when I have made a fortune I will 
come back for you. So good-bye 
Edith, God bless you." 

Edith left Joe's humble cottage very 
much cast down. She walked slowly 
back to her home. She knew that she 
must avoid meeting her father, for he 
had forbidden her ever to speak to 
him again, and if he saw her coming 
from the direction of Joe's home there 
would be trouble. She got home safe- 
ly without meeting her father and 
crept quietly upstairs. In the silence 
of her room she sat and meditated. 

Just how long she sat there she was 



not able to tell, but suddenly she was 
startled by her father's stern voice de- 
manding her to put out ihe light at 
once and retire. She was dazed but 
she turned out the h'ght and went to 
bed. 

While Edith was sitting in her room 
meditating, Joe was busy packing his 
trunk prior to leaving early the next 
morning. He worked slowly for his 
heart was sad. 

He left his dear home just as the 
sun was lighting up the eastern skies. 
He boarded the train and after one sad 
glance in the direction of Edith's home 
he left the platform of the car and 
went inside. Thus he left to make his 
fortune. 

When the Judge heard that Joe had 
left he was very much elated, for he 
now saw his way clear to work out his 
plan of having Edith marry Harry 
Smith. So one day he went over to 
the Smith's and took Edith with him. 
She knew very well what induced him 
to pay this visit at this time. When 
they were leaving Harry took the op- 
portunity to ask Edith to call some 
evening. She consented. 

As time went on Edith and Harry 
became good friends. One day while 
out in the meadows gathering flowers 
and butterflies he told her of his love 
for her. She, however, told him that 
she did not love him and could there- 
fore not consent to marrying him. He 
became extremely angry at her and 
with a threat on his lips he left her. 

Her father was very much disap- 
pointed as well as angry when he 
learned of the action of his daughter. 
Cut there was no way to com)!' 1 be. to 
marry Harry. 

It was one afterno'n .t •' her of 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



years later while Edith was resting in 
a hammock beneath a shade tree that 
slie glanced around her, for she felt a 
strange feeling as if someone was 
watching her. She looked around 
again and with a cry of joy she sprang 
!■ 'rward lo he met by Joe. 

"\>)w 1 may have you," he said, 
"for I have made a fortune greater 
than that of your own father, and i 
have v.oiked and waited long." 

Joe, can it be you," was all Edith 
could answer and swooned. She soon 
regained consciousness again. 

Then he told her how he had toiled 
hard and was now the owner of the 
largest ]-acking concern in the West. 
He alfo told her of the home he had 
built for her and some of the minor 
details of his life. 

The day^ for the wedding came. It 
was a beautiful June day. It was a 
perfect day. 1 ut there was an awful 
doom hf.x'ering over the whole affair. 



Xo one could exactly describe the 
feelings they had. 

The ceremonv performed, the bride 
and groom were ushered through a 
crowd of friends to a waiting auto- 
mobile. Soon they were speeding 
away. As they were passing through 
a wood and nearing the other side, a 
bullet came flying through the air. 

"O Joe, I'm shot," Edith cried. They 
hurried on to the nearest hospital. 
Tenderly they worked over her, but to 
no a\ail. She died. Joe was com- 
pletely overcome and could not rea- 
lize for weeks just what had happened. 

The threat on the lips of Harry 
Smith when he left Edith that after- 
noon years ago was fulfilled. 

Joe Ci>uld not endure being any- 
where at all where Edith had once 
been, so he left for his western home 
to live and to dream of what might 
have been. 



The Tragical End of Donald Luther. 

Harry D. Moyer. 



Having looked into a loving moth- 
er's grave for the last time, Donald 
Luther turned his face towards the 
spot, not long since called home. It 
was true that the same old house w-as 
there, and the rooms in the same con- 
dition as before, but the real home 
maker had been left behind. 

At last he reached this place, and 
entered the house. Then he stood by 
the table and looked into the chair, 
now emptied of its treasure and ex- 
claimed, "Oh ! it is impossible for me 



to bear this I cannot remain here. I 
must lea\e." 

It was in this mood that he decided 
to go to the city to find work. Ruth 
Blank, the best friend he had on earth 
now. had begged him not to go, just 
the night before but to no avail. He 
must go somewhere where he can for- 
get some of his troubles. 

As the evening train pulled out of 
that little station a few days later, on 
its steps was one waving a fond fare- 
well to Ruth. She stood and watched 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the train disappear around the curve 
in the distance, then wiping la big 
tear out of the corner of her eye, she 
turned towards home. She had her 
doubts and fears about Donald; she 
knew his disposition better than any- 
one else now knew it, and she feared 
he would soon forget his home and his 
friends. 

Donald entered the city as the sun 
was sinking behind the western hills. 
Now for the first time during his trip 
did he feel lonely. There was no one 
in all this large city whom he knew, 
and he would have to face all troubles 
himself. He knew it would not better 
matters any to worry about it, so he 
brushed aside all fears and made his 
way hurriedly along the crowded 
streets to one of the large hotels. Here 
he decided to rest for the night. 

Since Donald was very ambitious, 
it was not very long until he found 
work in the city and for a long time, 
every evening found him in his room 
reading good books or writing letters 
to his friends. Next to him roomed a 
young man, who was out every night, 
and could not understand why Donald 
did not go out sometimes. At last 
he could see it no longer and came to 
Donald's room one evening, asking 
him to go along down the street, so 
that he would not get lonesome. 

"Oh, no!" replied Donald, with a 
smile, "I do not need to go out for 
that, because I never get lonely." 

"Even if you don't, go along any- 
how," urged his new friend. "We 
will have a good time together." 

After some hesitation, Donald arose 
and went with this young man. They 
went to a fine theater first, and after 
that was over Donald wished to go 



home, but this man insisted that he 
meet some of his chums. So they 
walked down the street together until 
they came to a saloon, lit up in 
dazzling brightnebs, into which they 
went. After . being introduced to 
these men, they kindly insisted that 
Donald should also join the game of 
cards they had just started. After 
much deliberation, Donald consented 
to help them. He, becoming interest- 
ed in the game, and also feeling rather 
merry because of the wine they had 
given him, played until the streaks of 
morning light could be seen in the 
East, before he realized w^hat had 
happened. He then staggered to his 
boarding-place, penniless, and drunk. 

Donald slept a short time and then 
wanted to go to work, but he did not 
feel able. What was to be done? He 
was ashamed to go to his landlord 
without any money to pay for his 
boarding, so after thinking with a 
cloudy brain, he entered the room of 
one of his fellow boarders and opened 
a bureau drawer. Before him lay 
twenty dollars. He decided to take 
the money and leave for another city. 
He was about to take the money out 
of the drawer, when his hand was 
stayed at the thought of Ruth. "She'll 
never find it out," he muttered. "I 
must have it. and I'll take it. It's not 
wrong for me to take what he took 
from me last night." 

Donald took the money, paid his 
board and went to the freight yard, 
and boarded a slow freight, that was 
bound for the West. As he was going 
away from his work, and farther away 
from home, he thought of Ruth and 
his angel mother. Then the most 
stinging pangs of remorse pierced ''-; 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



heart. Having rode that way for 
about two days he found himself 
stranded, several miles from a large 
western citj-, on a small siding. 

Partly out of fear of car inspectors 
and partly for exercise, he started to 
walk the remaining distance. When 
he reached the city he went into a 
saloon and drank to deaden the pain 
which his conscience gave him. He 
soon found some work, and for years, 
Donald went on in this unhappy way, 
at times drinking heavily to feel good 
for a few moments. 

Five years had passed since he had 
written the last letter to Ruth Blank. 
He had nothing by which to remember 
her. sa\-e the little round photograph 
in the back of his watch. During all 
that time, he continued to sink lower 
and lower. He hoped she would never 
find out that he was a drunkard, be- 
cause he knew that would make her 
unhajipy. But she was far away and 
he supposed she would never find it 
<nit. So he staggered to the saloon, 
and drank until he was "dead drunk." 
He remained in the bar-room until 
midnight. Then being thrown into the 
street when the saloon was closed, he 
sulTered the most intense agony he 
had ever suffered. In his agony he 
^aw the blackest and vilest snakes 
coming towards him, demons rejoiced 
in high glee around him, and many 
other obnoxious and frightful beings 
came to torment him. His misery was 
almost unbearable. While lying there 
in the gutter, recovering from the most 
terrible fit of delirium tremens that 
he had \;ver experienced, he felt a 
hand tenderly brush the sweat from 
his forehead. He opened his eyes 
.,: d t!:e:-e v.t.s Ruth, the one to whom. 



years before, he had promised to be 
true, looking tenderly down into his 
eyes. This sobered him a little while. 
It was too much. He burst into tears. 
He was not himself long because of 
the reaction that followed, and so 
Ruth had him removed to her room 
immediately. 

For a long time letters had passed 
back and forth between them, but sud 
denly Donald's letters ceased to come. 
She patiently waited for his return 
but he did not come. Something seem- 
ed to tell her, he would never come, 
and she waited against all hopes. For 
a long time, she fought the idea that 
her mission in life was to help others 
out of the ruin which must have over- 
whelmed her own sweetheart. After 
a long and hard battle she surrendered 
all to go \\;pre suffering humanity 
needed her. She was led down to one 
of the most miserable slums you ever 
laid eves on. It was on one of her 
trips that she found Donald recovering 
from a most terrible fit of delirium 
tremens. 

She had carefully nursed him until 
he was almost sober, talked to him, 
and read the Bible to him, and yet he 
seemed unhappy. At last she said to 
him, "Donald what is the matter?" 

He looked into her eyes and trem- 
bling like a leaf said, "Ruth, I am too 
miserable to live and yet cannot die, 
until I have told you one thing. I 
promised to be true to you and have 
broken my promise, — yet that is not 
it." Because of the night's exposure, 
Ruth knew that the silver cord had 
broken and that the end w^ould soon 
be here. She waited, and soon in 
tones scarcely audible came, "I liave 
made a drunkard of mys:lf — in spile 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



of your pleadings — but it's not that." 
After a short pause he added, "Ruth, 
I — I — stole twenty dollars five years 
ago because — I — I — gambled." And 
slowly reaching his hand towards hers 
said, "Promise me Ruth — to — pay it — 



back— and forgive — me. Only — then 
can — I lie — happy." Their eyes .met, 
and the smile that lit up his face as he 
drew his last breath, showed her that 
her answer had made him happy for 
the first time in the past five years. 



Conquest Without War 



Naomi G. Longenecker. 



"Well here I am at last, at dear old 
Greenwood. What a beautiful place it 
is ! No wonder father wished me to 
see it. I'll just sit here awhile under 
this tree and look around." 

Richard Conway sat looking at the 
great old house which he had been told 
had been owned by a Conway for near- 
ly a hundred and fifty years. He look- 
ed at the valley in the distance and the 
towering mountains beyond. He could 
hear the flowing river. About him were 
tall trees and beyond him a long ter- 
raced lawn. .Suddenly his dreams were 
interrupted by the low sound of 
women's voices not far away. 

"It was under that tree, daughter, on 
a day like this, that my first lover pro- 
posed to me. What a splendid man 
he was! I remember it very well. It 
was a day on which the Conways gave 
a lawn social." 

"What was his name muther? 
.And where is he now? Tell me all 
about him." 

"Wc will not sjieak of his name. 
I hit I'll tell ynu why I refused him al- 
though I cared for him. There was 
too great a difference between our 
wealth and social positions. He never 



knew what it meant to me, but he was 
not nearly so dear to me as your 
father, IMildred." 

"Wliere is he now. mother?" 

"He lived in one of the western 
states and added a great deal of wealth 
to that which he already had. He and 
hiswife are both dead, and the only son 
is a great philanthropist. He is es- 
pecially interested in orphan children, 
they say. He must be about your age." 

Behind the tree Richard Conway sat 
deeply interested. He knew very well 
that it was his father of whom she 
spoke, for he had told him of the inci- 
dent. Richard knew that it would be 
useless to try to buy the place after 
hearing them .speak about their love for 
the old place, so he stole quietly away. 

But he was curious at least to see 
the i>l(l lady who was once a sweet- 
heart (if his father's, so he called that 
evening and told them, among other 
things, his reason for coming. He 
wished to buy the home for the loca- 
tion of an orphanage, because the place 
would be ideal for that purpose. 

Mildred Deane consented to con- 
sider the matter and after a few re- 
marks had been exchanged Richard 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



Conway left. Mildred thought too 
that the place would be splendid for 
the poor children in whom she too was 
interested. 

After that Richard called frequently 
to tran.sact business. But later he was 
invited to call and because of the work 
in which both Richard and Mildred 
were engaged they became close 
friends. 

After some persuasion Mildred's 
mother consented to Vthe Iselling of 
Greenwood although her heart felt 
Tieavy at the thought of leaving it. But 
for the .sake of the children and Mil- 
<3red she consented. 

At a gathering given in honor of 
the leaving of Greenwood, Richard 
Conway was present. After most of 
the guests had gone, Richard led Mil- 
dred to the great old tree under whicl] 
his father had declared his love to Mil- 
dred's mother. They spoke of Rich- 
ard's plans concerning the orphanage 
which he intended to build in the near 
future. Then Richard told her of his 
love for her and how necessary she had 
become to his happiness, and Mildred 
thinking only of the love she had for 
Richard and of the good they could do, 



ago, 



unlike her mother thirty 
consented to be his wife. 

But Mildred thought she was going 
to be married to Richard Carvel when 
she promised to be the wife of Richard 
Conway. He dared keep the truth 
from her no longer, so he told her his 
true name and what he had heard 
while sitting under the same tree two 
years ago, and fearing they would not 
sell Greenwood if they knew him, he 
had changed his name. Later when he 
learned to love her and and determined 
to marry her, he feared she too would 
do as her mother had done. So he 
kept his name a secret as long as he 
dared. 

When Mrs. Deane heard about it 
she only said, while laughing, "I 
thought I ought to recognize him since 
the first night I saw him. He looks 
just like his father did thirty years 
ago." 

The life of Mildred and Richard 
proved a blessing to countless orphans, 
and they proved to Mildrel's mother 
that they could be happy in spite of a 
difference in social position and 
wealth. 



■-^:f^V^:^ 



The Call of Joan of Arc 

Linda B. Huber. 



In a remote village among the wild 
hills of Lorraine, there lived with her 
parents, a sweet-faced peasant girl 
whose name was Joan of Arc. She 
was a solitary girl from her childhood 
she had often tended sheep and cattle 
for days and did not, at such times, see 
a human being nor hear a human voice. 
One day when the burden of her soul 
was ereat, she wandered away from 
the flock of sheep and leaning against 
tlie trunk of an old tree, she solili- 
quized in the following manner: 

"Oh, why can I not rid my heart 
of this alluring fanc3% which seems to 
rob me of all other thoughts and de- 
sires, this dream, nay this vision ?" 

"Ah, well do I remember the day 
when this vision first appeared to me. 
But that was long, long ago and I 
was then a happy child free from care. 
How gladly did I go to the little 
chapel to confession, but now it is dif- 
ferent, childhood days are past and I 
am a woman, with a woman's heart. 
But, ah, it is a strange heart; it is 
filled with one desire only and that is 
to do this strange command which 
the blessed saints iiave commanded me 
to do." 

"TTow well do I rememlier the first 
day and tb.e first time I saw the vision 
and heard tlic voices speak to me in 
accents clear and sweet! I had gone, 
as usual, to the little chapel to say my 
vesper r ravers and as I knelt before 
the Ble.ssed Virgin I saw that strange 
unearthly light and then — sliall T ever 



forget the voice that spoke to me? It 
was Saint Michael's voice telling me 
to go and help the Dauphin ; then the 
next day I heard the dear Saint Cath- 
erine and how she did fill my heart 
with strange desires as she told me 
to be firm, to be resolute ! 

Ah, yes, that was long ago and still 
the voices keep urging me to leave 
these lovely hills, to go into the midst 
of battle and save my beloved France. 

"Yet it was only this morning that 
my father told me that it was all a 
fancy and that I had better have a 
husband, and work to empl<iy my 
mind. But I shall never have a hus- 
band. I \-ow it, I must do what 
Heaven commands me to do." 

"Oh ! I must go, I must go. Yester- 
dey when I saw that party of the 
Dauphin's enemies burn our beloved 
chapel, drive out the inhabitants, and 
Tuelly murder the helpless little chil- 
dren, how my heart burned witli anger 
against them and my fingers ached to 
grasp the sword and fight for my 
France! It has filled me with woe, 
\\ ith sorrow. I shall go ; yes, go into 
the very midst of bloodshed and strife. 

"I can see it all as though it were 
a painted picture before me. I can see 
death, but I must go, for the voices 
of the beloved saints tell me it is ac- 
cnrdiny to the prophecv that I am the 
one who shall deliver France, help the 
naunhin. and then sec him crowned at 
Rlicims." 

"O. Blessed \'irgin be thou still with 
me and do thrtu guide me for this 
night ; I shall take my de-iarture. The 
time is at hand when I must c]n what 
Heaven demands of me." 



Egypt's Contributions to Civilization. 

Clayton B. Miller 



In the ni )rniiig of history, Egypt, a 
nation tiuite advanced in achievements, 
jicers above the horizon. The geo- 
graphical location of this country, its 
climate, and the overflow of the Nile 
liave been \ery important in the pro- 
iluction of its staple products and, con- 
'^equently, in the development of the 
other phases of life, such as the in- 
dustrial, commercial, governmental, 
mid intellectual. 

The early Egyptians were great 
l)uilders. Their pyramids are famous 
the world over. The greatest of these 
is the one at Gizeh, covering an area 
I'f thirteen acres and reaching to the 
height of four hundred and fifty feet, 
and was built b}- Khufic, or Cheops, 
during the Fourth Dynasty. Other 
works, which require building genius 
are the obelisks, sphinxes, temples 
with large columns and halls. Egypt- 
ian ingenuity manifested itself in the 
l)erfecting of a very practical system 
nf irrigation accomplished by the build- 
ing of dikes, reservoirs, and channels. 
To accomplish these gigantic works, 
enormous energy, strong determina- 
tion, and efficient organization were es- 
sential. The mummies of many of the 
ancient Pharaohs, especially that of 
Khufu, indicate the fact that these men 
IKissessed great will power. Of Khufu, 
Petrie says, "As far as force of will 
giies, the strongest characters in his- 
tory wnild look pliable in his presence. 
There is no face (|uite parallel to this 
in all the portraits that we know. 



Egyptian, Greek, Roman, or modern. 

The pyramids are the greatest mass 
of masonry that has ever been put to- 
gether by man. They seem to tower 
in their majesty soon after the end of 
pre-historic times, or as Myers says, 
"They mark not the beginning, but in 
some respects, the perfection of Egypt- 
ian art.'" The world to-day stands 
amazed at their architecture because 
of the degree of perfection attained and 
the difficulty of construction. Raw- 
linson says, "It is doubtful whether the 
steamsawing of today could be trusted 
to produce in ten years from the 
quarries of .Aberdeen a single obelisk 
such rs those which the Pharao'.is set 
up by the dozens." 

Religiously, the Egyptians were 
polytheists, yet a few of the higher 
class had a faint idea of a Supreme 
Being. They believed in the doctrine 
of the future life, which idea governed 
their life here on earth. They em- 
balmed thei ■ dc:d so perfectly that it 
is said of Seti I and Rameses II that 
if their subjects were to return to the 
earth to-day. they could n t fail to 
recognize their old sovereign. 

.As memorials for the royal dead, the 
nyramids were built ; tombs were also 
hewn in th° rocks, in which to bury 
the dead. It appears that for safety 
mary of their dead bodies were later 
trar^-ferred to tombs liewn in the ro-k=; 
behind the Nile. In the rear of Thebe-, 
ther" pre so many of the^e rock-cut 
sepiilchrcs that it has been called the 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



"Westminster Abbey of Egypt." 

Numerous carvings representing the 
body of the deceased were made on the 
lid of the coffin. "Portrait statuettes of 
the deceased," and pictures of diiiferent 
foods were placed in the tombs to meet 
the needs of the soul in after-life. The 
tombs in the pyramids and catacombs 
contain many bas-reliefs and paintings 
of the deceased's achievements. To 
archaeologist and the historian these 
are very important, because from them 
important data of Egyptian history are 
procured. 

The thought of the life beyond the 
grave affected not only the mere burial 
of the dead, but it was also valuable 
and stimulating morally. Both high 
and low were to appear in judgment, 
where the soul sought to justify itself 
according to the Negative Confession. 
This standard is in some respects sim- 
ilar to the Ten Commandments of the 
Mosaic Code. They were impelled, 
somewhat at least, to regard others 
with equal consideration as themselves. 
The}- sought not only to avoid evil, 
but also to practice deeds of charity, 
which is indicated by the following: 
"I have give bread to the hungry and 
drink to him who was athirst ; I have 
clothed the naked with garments," 
The belief was held that the good 
would dwell with Osiris, and the bad 
would suffer annihilation. Thus we 
note that these people, even early in 
their history, had a well educated con- 
science for their age. 

The people were mainly sentimental, 
sympathetic, gentle, and considerate of 
the poor, "If less refined than .Athens, 
yet in some points, both more moral 
and more civilized. The Egyptian 
without our Christian sense of sin or 



self-reproach, sought out a fair and 
noble life. His aim was to be an easy, 
good-natured, and quiet gentleman, 
and to make life as agreeable as he 
could to all about him." That they 
so nearly reached the true idea of re- 
ligion without the right means of reve- 
lation impresses us with the fact of 
the necessity of the Word, Christ, and 
the Holy Spirit in order to acquire 
Truth. 

There were two classes, the rich and 
the poor, yet the p 'Or enjoyed some 
privileges and liberties in embryo. On 
account of current ideas, abs ilute des- 
potism did not dominate. From a 
papyrus of the Twelfth Dynasty, we 
have the incident that "a peasant rob- 
bed through a legal trick by the de- 
pendent of a royal officer, appeals to 
the judge and finally to the King; the 
King commands redress, enjoining his 
officers to do justice." Notwithstand- 
ing this, the people were heavily taxed 
and the government was aristocratic. 

\\'oman was held in higher esteem 
than among the Greeks, for she was 
considered as the true companion of 
man and possessed equal rights with 
him. Tier life was not so secluded as 
is female life among the Mohammed- 
ans. She enjoyed a happy home life, 
influence the ' life of her son or hus- 
band and, consequently, held a high 
social position. 

The people, as a rule, were of a 
jovial disposition, regarding with es- 
teem those who were older. They 
amused themselves in festivities, music 
and sports. 

Their language at first, as found 
upon the monuments, consisted of the 
hieroglyphical, or picture form of writ- 
ing, which was later combined with 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the alphabetical system, upon papyrus. 
The papyrus, the name from which 
we derive the word paper, was made 
of reeds. This then is in harmony 
with "the paper reeds by the brooks. . 
. .shall wither, be driven away, and be 
no more," (Isa. 19:7.) The writing 
was done with a pointed reed, dipped 
in red or black ink. Their achieve- 
ments in writing and literature were of 
no small inir;ortance. The Book of 
the Dead, the oldest book in the world, 
was con.'^idered as a guide in the jour- 
ney to the future life. Their works con- 
sisted of novels, romances,, fairy tales, 
letters, documents, a book of advice 
for young and old, writings on medi- 
cine, astronomy, and other sciences. A 
celebrated fairy tale is "Cinderella and 
the Glass Slipper." Valuable histori- 
cal data was gathered and preserved. 
The works on history are not inferior 
to those of the Greeks. The estimate 
of the Egyptian priests themselves of 
the comparative value of the works of 
these two peoples is set forth in these 
words. "You Greeks are mere children, 
talkative, and vain ; you know nothing 
at all of the past." In compariog the 
age of their literary attainments. West 
says, ".^11 this learning is older than 
that of the Greeks by alinnst twice as 
long a time as that of the Greeks is 
older than ours to-day." 

The clear blue sky above them in- 
vited a study of the stars, so that they 
gathered some of the principles of as- 
tronomy, by noticing the "changing 
cvcles of the stars" in conjunction with 
the annual overflow of the Nile, they 
discovered that there are 365 days in 
a year, and added one every fourth 
\ear. Thi calendar was introduced 
])v Caesar into the Roman empire, was 



revised by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582, 
and is still used by the civilized world. 
The Egyptians thus learned when to 
e.xpect the Nile's overflow. On account 
of this annual occurrence, they were 
re(|uircd to re-establish their bound- 
aries and thus some of the fundamental 
principles of geometry were discovered 
and used: For the solution of their 
problems numerical expressions were 
used. Their arithmetical numbers ran 
up to millions. Scientific knowledge 
was largely possessed by the priests 
and was studied out of necessity and 
its practical value, but it needed to be 
stripped of superstition. 

Industrially, they engaged in such 
pursuits as spinning, weaving cotton 
and woolen cloth, pottery and glass 
trianufacture, gem cutting, and cabinet 
work. Their houses, particu'larly those 
of the higher classes, were built in a 
beautiful style, and their gardens and 
walks were well laid out. Saddlers, 
shoemakers, iron and brass workers, 
coppersmiths, goldsmiths , sculptors, 
embalmers, and scribes were other 
lines of work followed. They under- 
stood the use of colors quite well, so 
that they were able to achieve some- 
thing in paintiig. Under government 
employ were clerks and secretaries. 
Some of these arts remained unprac- 
ticed until in modern times. During the 
later period of their nation?! history, 
they were successful in navigation, 
such as the circumnavigation of Africa. 

E-0"]it's wonderful ]ir iductiveness 
and proximity to Pale-tine afforded 
her an excellent opportunity to sup- 
port and preserve the Hebrews during 
a ]V riod of famine. Thus for about 
four hundred years, Egypt sheltered 
the children of Israel, played an im- 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



portant part in shaping the history of 
the greatest people — a people having 
the loftiest ideals and the highest con- 
ception of religion in ancient times. 
During this period of sojourn in Egypt, 
the Hebrews came in touch with some 
of the highest culture of the ages. 
This culture proved to be useful in the 
life of Moses, the deliverer of the He- 
brews, who received his literary train- 
ing in the Egyptian court. 

Egyptian learning became serviceable 
to other nations when it was distib- 
uted bej'ond her borders. This was 
done by conquest, trade, and travel. 
Through the Phoenicians, and the 
Hittites it spread to Asia, and through 
the Lydians the Greeks came in touch 



with it before her doors were thrown 
open. Consequently, through the 
Greeks, and then through the Romans.- 
her influence in time affected the life 
of Western Europe. 

The (history of Egypt reveals an 
"Age of Beginnings." According to 
Myers, here we find "germs of civili- 
zation." Sayres says, "We are the heirs 
of the civilized past and a goodly por- 
tion of that civilized past was the crea- 
tion of ancient Egypt. The mission 
of Egypt among the nations was ful- 
filled, it had lit the torch of civilization 
in ages inconceivably remote and had 
passed it on to other peoples of the 
West." 



The Social 

"Will all the ladies pass to the Re- 
ception Room, after adjournment and 
wait until called," was Miss Myer's 
request as the Keystone Literary So- 
ciety was about to adjourn one Friday 
night some weeks ago. A few mo- 
ments later a general hub-bub ensued 
in the Reception Room as merry 
laughter, anxious questions, exclama- 
tions, and the like, all sought to have 
supremacy. 

"I wonder what they are going to do 
with us," exclaimed one. 

"Oh, look at Mary's new dress," 
cried another. 

"See how long it is," came from a 
new quarter. "Let's put her on the 
table." 

This was no sooner said by a fourth 
girl than the astonished and embarrass- 
ed Mary found herself high above the 
others upon the table, while the eyes 
of a whole assembly of girls were upon 
her. Not enjoying it, she jumped 
down and aided in putting up Eliza 
beth who as usual fell into the spirit 
of the occasion, waved her hands and 
jum]ied down requesting that all the 
girls join hands and sing as they 
marched around the room. Wholly 
engrossed with the fun, the girls were 



unconscious of the presence of new- 
comers until some one called, "Come to 
Music Hall." 

There stood the escorts to see that 
the order was carried out. Upon 
reaching the designated place each 
girl left her escort and passed "Behind 
the scenes," which only meant passing 
to the rear of a large white sheet 
having three holes cut into it much 
like a triangle in shape. 
.After all grew quiet and the girls 
managed to keep off each other's feet 
in the little space allotted to them. 
Miss Myer's voice was again heard 
saying. " Each gentleman may now 
test his ability in distinguishing the 
girls by recognizing them by their eyes 
and nose." The scene which followed 
was intensely interesting to all con- 
cerned. Various features of interest 
then followed, one of which was a test 
of our knowledge of familiar songs. 
The person guessing the highest num- 
ber was awarded the prize. It certain- 
ly is peculiar how you think you know 
and alas, you don't. Several selections 
of good music both instrument. -il and 
vocal were rendered for the enjoyment 
of those present who were then par- 
taking of the refreshments. 




EDITORIAL BOARD 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, Editor-in-Chief 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 



.School Notes 



Mary G. Hershey . . . |^ 
Orville Z. Beclver. . ( 

Nora L. Reber Homerlan News 

Naomi Longenecker K. L. S. News 



J. D. Reber Alumni Notes 

Isaac J. Kreider E^xcnanges 

J. H. Gingrich Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider Art Editor 



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Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates:— Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for $2.00. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postofflce. 



Bible Term is over and everybody is 
again pursuing his school work with 
greater diligence. May we take new 
encouragement from the many good 
things we heard from the dififerent 
teachers. 

We feel that special attention should 
he called to the Chapel Talk given by 
Miss Elizabeth Kline on Friday, Feb- 
ruary 6. Her remarks on the conduct 
of students were especially helpful to 
all who aim to attain true manliness 
and true womanliness. May we as 
students and teachers often think of 



our attitude towards our neighbors at 
school. 

We wish to congratulate the student 
body on the excellent spirit manifested 
in our basket ball games. The system 
of home athletics seems to bring more 
good to our student body than that 
of inter-collegiate athletics could se- 
cure. Nearly all of our students play 
the game and enjoy its physical bene- 
fits. A wholesome spirit of rivalry ex- 
ists between various departments, and 
classes. We hope this spirit will con- 
tinue and brill!/ beneficial results to 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



all of our students instead of only to a 
few skilled players. 

As the Spring Term approaches, 
many teachers will be looking around 
for a place to qualify themselves for 
the County examinations. We wish 
to reccomend such teachers to try 
Elizabethtown College for the Spring 
Term work. We are confident our 
college has exceptional opportunities 
to ofTer to those preparing for exami- 
nations. The faculty is composed of 
efficient instructors and the classes as 
a rule are not so large. Consequently, 
individual attention is assured. The 
methods of teaching used at our insti- 
tution are modern in every respect. 

Special classes will be formed to 
meet the needs of those who desire 
special drill in various branches. All 
such work successfully completed will 
be accepted toward the completion of 
a course of study. We trust many will 
take advantage of this s lecial term. 
An announcement of the Spring Term 
work ;ip]iears elsewhere in this issue. 

The Ordeal of Richard Feverel 

ThroiK'h tlie death of George Mere- 
dith sev<-ral vears ago the world lost 
one of its best novelists. Meredith 
holds at present a high position among 
the novelist of the latter half of the 
nineteenth century. His aim in writing 
was to embrace the philosophy of life. 
The minor novelists were beginning to 
drift from this ]irinciple which fills the 
pages of Scott, Eliot, and Thackeray, 
and so Meredith sounded a warning. 
He '^aid, "The forecas.t may be hazard- 
ed that if wc do not speedily embrace 
philosophy ill fiction, the art is divun- 



ed to extinction." It may be argued 
that the philosophy in his novels pro- 
duces weariness to the readers. This 
objection is met by the skilful and in- 
tricate intermingling of interesting an 1 
striking passages with his aphorisms. 

His works give an accurate insight 
nitc Ihe livcb of the aristocratic "set"' 
in V.ngland. This class of people com- 
pare> ftnkingly in some respects with 
our rich cla.-^s in .America, and yet is 
wholly different in ether respects. 
Men and women of these classes pay 
much attcnti(in to dress, luxuries, and 
line mansions. This is a ccommon 
characteristic. On the other hand, the 
lady in England has to observe many 
customs and be encuml:ered with 
many traditional duties both of which 
the rich American beauty never 
dreams of. On this account the feat- 
ures of aristocracy must be understood 
lo a large degree before one can really 
enjoy the works of Meredith. In de- 
]MCting the life of the rich class he has 
drawn his characters exceptionally 
well and proves himself a student of 
human nature. Meredith saw the 
highest expression of beauty in women 
and in nature. These two are beauti- 
fully portrayed in "The Ordeal of 
Richard Feverel." 

This novel is the earliest of his noted 
works and is jjrobably his best work. 
The story opens with a beautiful love 
scene which is hardly surpassed by any 
writer. Richard, the son of a rich 
baronet. Sir Austin Feverel, is the 
hero. Lucy, the daughter of a neigh- 
boring farmer, is a sweet lass whom 
Ricliard loves and often meets in the 
verdant meadows in spite of parental 
objection. Sir .Austin decides to rear 
hi^ siiii iiv a svsteni in which it was 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



intended that nature should have little 
to d(i in the formation of his life. 
Richard at an early age foils the in- 
tentions of his father and secretly 
marries Lucy who is returning from a 
nunnery. They go to the Isle of 
Wight, but Richard soon separates 
from his bride and is plunged into his 
ordeal. He meets evil companions in 
London, associates with shameless 
-women, becomes unfaithful to his wife, 
ashamed to go home, and wanders to 
France. Here the birth of his son 
calls him to himself again and he de- 
cides to go home to his wife. But he 
is unwilling to remain with her, 
though she has loved him faithfully 
during all his troublesome times. The 
book has an unusual ending. A duel 
is fought in France in which Richard 
falls and his wife on hearing this 
gradually pines away and finally dies 
of a broken heart. 

The household of Sir Austin is com- 
posed of a variety of characters whose 
eccentricities are the source of humor 
in the work. The boyish teacher, Ad- 
rian Harley, will speak only in aphor- 
isms, which contain much sound phi- 
losophy. Algernon Feverel is ever 
groaning under the pains of dyspepsia 
and at times is to he laughed at, and 
pitied at other times. The scheming 
mother is an excellent type of women 
of that class. Clare, the beautiful 
little girl who had to submit to her 
mother's desires rather than be per- 
mitted to enjoy her own innocent 



pleasures, meets with the deepest sym- 
pathy on the part of the reader. 

The story follows one theme 
throughout, the trials and temptations 
of Richard Feverel. The plot posses- 
ses excellent unity with the exception 
probably of too much emphasis on the 
whims of Mrs. Berry and her treat- 
ment of Lucy. The action of the novel 
accords very well with the characters 
and is easily followed by the reader. 
He does not swamp the characters 
with incidents but gives just enough 
to sustain the interest and develop his 
characters. 

The writer possesses an excellent 
poetic gift which manifests itself fre- 
quently in his descriptions of mead- 
ows and streams. On the repetition of 
Clare's name after her death, Richard 
says, "Her name sounded faint and 
mellow now behind the hills of death." 
It has been said that Meredith as a 
poet equals Meredith as a novelist. 

The book deserves a careful reading 
by all lovers of human nature. The 
aphorisms contain many thoughts 
which may well cling to the memory. 
It is not unlikely that the book will 
sooner or later be placed on a level 
with those of Scott, Dickens, and 
Thackary. The more one reads of 
Meredith, the better the reader enjoys 
his virile stories. To Meredith be- 
longs much praise for keeping high the 
standard of the novel, a fact which is 
exemplified at its best in Richard Fe- 
verel. 




s 



We were glad to welcome a number 
of old faces int i our circle again since 
Bible Term. Elam Zug and Mack 
Falkenstein have re-entered college to 
take further work. The number of 
day students is exceptionally large 
this term. 

On January ^Jk:]. we had with us Dr. 
Byron C. Piatt, for the third time. He 
gave us his lecture entitled "Dead or 
Alive?" which was interesting as well 
as instructive. 

Several weeks ago Miss Gertrude 
Hess, of Kauffman, Pennsylvania, 
paid a slmrt visit to the school and 
brought with her her brother Paul K. 
Hess who entered as a student in the 
Commercial Department. 

One of our former students, Virgil 
Holsinger, of William.sburg, preached 
an interesting and heli^ful sermon in 
the College ChajK'! on the evening of 
January 25. 

Ths Girls' Glee Club of the dllege 
sang several selections of music on 
Friday evening. February 6, at a pro- 
gram given in the Market House Audi- 
torium in town. 

Miss Moyer went to town that very 
blustery Saturday a few weeks ago and 
her umbrella was turned wrong side 
out three times. She brouglit it home 
and hung it on the firj extinguisher 



h 















t 



L 



in the hall where it hung unt'l Wednes- 
day when rumor said that it was mend- 
ed and that it looked as if never broken. 

Advertisement: Anyone having um- 
brella, to mend please bring them t3 
Room 12. Guaranteed to be as good 
as new. I also make a specialty of 
sharpening skates. Ryntha Shelly. 

F. S. Carper, of Palmyra who ha.s- 
been a student of the college this year 
left school last week to accept a posi- 
tion as clerk in the Valley Trust Com- 
pany, of his home town. Although we 
as a school regret to lose him yet our 
best w ishes go with him for success in 
Lis new work. 

The athletic phase of college life is 
manifesting itself mostly in Basket 
Ball, The girls have games every 
Tuesday and Thursday evening. An 
exciting game was recently played. 

The line up was as follows: 
N. Longenecker forward M. Hershey 
R. Landis forward S. Garber 

E. Falkenstein center O. Harshberger 
.A. Brubaker guard P.. Horst 

G. Moyer guard R. Shelly 

Miss Falkenstein's side was defeated 
by a score 35 — 26. 

The ladies are improving both in 
"pass'ng and goal pitching." 

Josh P.illings says: "When a yung 
man beginz tu go down hil evrithing 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



seams to be greezed fur the ockashun." 

Mr. Leiter says the ground-hog saw 
his shadow. So bundle up for six more 
weeks of cold weather. 

After an illness of about a week, 
during which time Miss Katherine Mil- 
ler, teacher in the Music Department, 
was confined to her room with a severe 
case of laryngitis, she was advised by 
her physician to leave school until her 
voice would be in condition for her to 
resume her work. We hope Miss Mil- 
ler will soon regain her voice and again 
be in our midst. 

Orville Becker writes his friends that 
he likes the west better every day. 

One night when a certain College 
boy called at a home in Elizabethtown 
the youngest member of the family 
very gravely remarked, "I know Avhat 
you want. You want Lillian." 

Mrs. J. P. Detweiler and son Vernon 
of New Enterprise, and Mrs. A. M. 
Smith and son Walter, of Woodbury, 
Pennsylvania, were guests of their 
sister. Miss Sara Rcplogle, over Sun- 
day. 

HOMERIAN NEWS. 

Since the beginning of last month 
the Homerian meetings have been very 
few. Short programs for private meet- 
ings had been prepared but were post- 
poned because of lectures and Bible 
Term features occurring at the appoint- 
ed dates for these meetings. Only one 
public program has been rendered 
since the last issue of this paper. .\s 
a whole it was pronounced a good one. 
Every performer showed that much 
time was spent in preparation. The 
various numbers of the program difi'er- 
ed vastly. Orplia Harshberger, a new 
member, recited in a pleasing manner 
"Love's Blossomings." Laura Landis 



also made her first appearance by read- 
ing an essay on "Art and its Masters." 
This paper was a very full and interest- 
ing discussion. It portrayed the read- 
er's inclinations and should have been 
of value to those interested in art. The 
question, "Resolved, That the Federal 
Reserve Act does not remedy the de- 
fects of our monetary system," was de- 
bated affirmatively by A. L. Reber and 
negatively by C. J. Rose. It was well 
debated but perhaps not fully appre- 
ciated since a knowledge of the ques- 
tion was foreign to most of the mem- 
bers. After the rebuttal the judges de- 
cided unanimously in f;n'or of the nega- 
tive. An inspiring number was the ad- 
dress by the soeaker, C. L. Martin. 

He presented his good thoughts in 
an oratorical and impressive manner. 
The dominant idea pertained to the 
gaining of real manhood. The music, 
which consisted of a vocal solo by C. 
L. Martin and an instrumental solo by 
Elizabeth Kline, was beautifully rend- 
ered. 

K. L. S. Notes. 

On January i6th there was a very 
intercstins' program rendered, the 
uiosi important feature of which was 
an address bv Dr. D. C. Reber. His 
subject was "The Montesorri System." 
He had henid the founder of the sys- 
tem a ^hort lime ago and was able to 
gi\-e much < f what he had heard. The 
speech was intensely interesting. 
There was a good address given by 
the president, Harry Aloyer. His sub- 
ject was, "The Secret of Success." It 
was treated in a "'ay that showed 
much thought and originality. Clar- 
ence ?.'u.■^selman then gave a decla- 
matiiin entitled. "The Two Roads." It 
was given in a manner which showed 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



that the spirit of the piece was feh. 
A reading entitled, "The Blacksmith 
of Ragenback," by Anna Brubaker 
showed careful thought in selection 
and was well read. The Literary Echo, 
by Helen Oellig was pronounced the 
best that had been read for a long 
time. 

The program given on January 23, 
was on the subject of Temperance. 
Arthur Burkhart gave a declamation 
entitled, "Building the Temple." The 
process was pictured very clearly to 
the audience. The question was then 
debated. Resolved, That the Temper- 
ance cause is making greater progress 
in the United States than the Liquor 
Dealer's Cause. The affirmative speak- 
ers, Sara Replogle and Frank Carper, 
gave such facts that won the debate. 
The negative sneakers, Esther Falken- 
stein and Robert Ziegler, gave many 
startling facts and statistics showing 
that the Liquor Dealers are awake to 
the interests of their business. "The 
Pauper Woman's Speech" was then re- 
cited bj' Naomi Longenecker, after 
which Lila Shimp and Bertha Perry 
sang, "Hark! Hark! my Soul." 

On January 30, the program began 
with a piano solo entitled, "Love 
Dreams," by Edna Wenger, who as 
usual pleased the audience. Anna Eb- 
ling gave a humorous reading entitled, 
"Barbara Blue." Although Miss Eb- 
ling appeared before the society for 
the first time she was very calm. 
Martha Martin and C. P.. Miller dis- 
cussed the .subject, "The Present Inter- 
est in Bible Study throughout the 
World." Miss Martin spoke of the 
personal interest and benefits, and Mr. 
Miller spoke of it in a general way. 
The discussions were very interesting 
and were followed by many short 
speeches from the audience. Jacob 
Gingrich then gave an oration entitled, 
"The Sweetest Thing Obtainable." 
Mary Elizabeth Miller then played 
"The Flyine Dutchman." Her interpre- 
tation enabled one to form a picture of 
the scenes represented in tlic compo- 
sition. 



Spring Term 

The Spring Term of 1914 opens on 
March 23, at which time the class work 
of the school will be largely reorgan- 
ized and many new classes formed. 
This term affords special advantages to 
those who have been teaching the past 
winter and are desirous of further 
qualifying themselves for better work 
in the school room. The professional 
teacher never ceases to grow and there 
are constantly new movements in edu- 
cation that he needs to understand, and 
new conditions to which he must con- 
stantly seek to adjust himself. 

Those coming from the public schools 
will also be accommodated with work 
in the common school branches suited 
to their needs. Those preparing for 
college may also enter profitabl}' at 
this time ; and since the work of this 
school is recognized by colleges of high 
standing, they can receive their pre- 
paratory training right at home. 

Normal School graduates will find 
the spring term a suitable time to do 
work in the Classical Course as the 
school offers collegiate work in Latin, 
Greek, German, French, English. 
Mathematics , and Pedagogy during 
the spring term. 

In the Pedagogical Department the 
following classes will be conducted: 
Elementary Pedagogy, School Manage- 
ment, Genetic Psychology, School Hy 
gienc, Physological Pedagogics, Sys- 
tems of Education, Ethics. Philos- 
ophy of Teaching. Other studies taught 
during the spring term are: Caesar, 
Cicero, Virgil. Elements of Latin and 
German. Solid Geometry, English 
Classics, Agriculture, Higher Arithme- 
tic, Botany. Chemi.stry, General His- 
tory Bookkeeping, Vocal Music, Eng- 
lish History,History of Pennsylvania, 
Physical Geography, Bible, and Ameri- 
can Literature. 

The expenses for boarding students 
for the spring term amount to fifty-five 
dollars. For day students the expense 
is eighteen dollars and fifty cents. 

The work done by students during 
the spring term will count towards 



OUR COLLF.GE TIMES 



23 



completing the various courses. Any- 
one interested in the school may re- 
ceive the annual catalogue upon appli- 
cation to the President. Applications 
should be made early as the outlook for 
a large attendance is very encouraging. 



Bible Term 

The Rible Term of Elizabethtown 
College opened on the morning of Jan. 
14, and continued with daily sessions 
until January 24. The days of this 
period were full of instruction and in- 
spiration. The following comprised 
our dailv instructors : T. G. Rover, of 
Mt. Morris, Illinois; S.H. Hertzler, D. 
C. Reber. Lydia Stauflfer, H. K. Obcr, 
J. M. Pittenger and Elizabeth Kline 
Elder J. C. Bright, of Ohio conducted 
our evening services and gave us ex- 
cellent sermons. 

We feel that our Bible Term was 
the best one ever held at our school. 
We had a splendid attendance and the 
interest continued throughout the en- 
tire Institute. 

Elder G. N. Falkenstein gave us a 
number of talks on "The History of the 
Church of the Brethren," which were 
of intense interest to all. 

Sister Hollinger, the wife of Elder 
David Hollinger, of Ohio spoke to us 
several evenings concerning their trip 
abroad. She has a pleasing person- 
alitv and we enjoyed her descriptions 
of the Ploly Land and her helpful 
thoughts very much. 

"Could I but attain an old age as 
rich and beautiful as that." was a 
thought that passed through the minds 
of many as they came in touch with 
one who instructed us from his rich 
stores of experience. There before us 
was an exaniple of quite though 
strong dignity, a personality whose in- 
fluence was felt by every one ; the in- 
telligence, culture and spiritualitv 
which manifested itself in his face shall 
live long in the memory of many. Wc 
wish that many more might have had 
the p'-ivi)c<'-c of coming in touch Vv ith 
Bro. J. G. Royer. In accordance with 



one of his favorite sayings, "If you 
have a good thought, don't be miserly 
with it but share it with others and it 
will grow in beauty." NVe will give a 
few gem thoughts given t ) us during 
the Bible Term. 

"Religion is the life of God in the 
soul of man." 

"The gold of life must be dug, up out 
of the rocks, as it were, with our hands. 
We must pay the price if we would 
have the best of life." 

"Faithfulness in the valley of hu- 
mility is the ladder by which we must 
climb heavenward round by round." 

"One will never be more than he 
really wants to be." "There is a man 
and a woman of forty, awaiting every 
boy and girl, who is absolutely help- 
less, Ijecoming only what that boy or 
girl will make that man or woman." 

Reader, have you ever stopped to 
think of this ques'tion, "Why am I not 
a better Christian?" When first this 
question echoed through College Chap- 
el, coming from the lips of Brother 
Pittenger as he stood before us with 
that look of deeo spirituality and con- 
secration upon his face, it was answer- 
ed bv a deep silence which was broken 
bv these words of his. "Bought with a 
price,— what does it mean?" His 
words were most beautiful and impres- 
sive, ard before he had ceased speak- 
ing he had helped us to see a deeper 
meaning and significance in those four 
words. " Bought with a price." 

We feel that the influenc3 of this 
Bible Term is far reaching, yea farther 
than we are now able to see. There 
was a spirit for more consecration and 
a closer walk with God aroused in the 
hearts of many, especially among those 
of the student body. Xor was this 
spirit an impulse of the moment, but 
the spirit has increased and is expres- 
sing itself in many ways, one of which 
is a consecration meeting of girls who 
are seeking light and truth. We meet 
in a little assembly under the direction 
and help of our Bible teacher. We 
feel tha*- ve are begirning to get a 
vision of the higher spiritual life. 




A. Mack Falkenstein, '13, has return- 
ed to his Ahna Mater to resume his 
studies. So far eight from this class 
have returned. Several more are com- 
ing back for the Spring Term. 

G. H. Light, '07, principal of the Hat- 
fields Schools, made a short call on Col- 
lege Hill and conducted the chapel 
exercises. 

M. Gertrude Hess, '11, entered the 
school of music at Oberlin College last 
January-. 

Viola E. Withers, '09, lately accepted 
the position as assistant teacher in in- 
strumental music at Juniata College. 
So far ten of the class of 1909 have been 
teachers or arc teaching in different 
colleges. 

B. F. Waltz, '10, was elected to the 
ministry by the Lancaster church. Mr. 
Waltz is the twelfth alumnus of the 
school that has been elected to the 
ministr\-. 



S. K. Brumbaugh, '13, is clerking at 
present for the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company, at Altoona. 

Orville Becker, '12, now lives at iioo 
South W^ashington Street, Denver, 
Colorado. He says he is enjoying 
western life. 



The folk 
of the Bibl 



ving alumni attended some 
Term sessions : — 



James Brcitigan, '05, John Miller. "05. 
Mamie Keller, '12, Agnes Ryan, 'cxj. 
Enoch Madeira, '08, Abel Madeira, '09, 
B. F. Waltz, '10, L. W. Leiter, '09, Mrs. 
Estella Frantz Martin, '09, Andrew 
Hollinger, '10, Airs. Frank Groff, '04, 
Gertrude Keller, '12, Irene Wise, '12, 
G. H. Light, 05, Irene Sheetz, '13, Mrs. 
Opal Hoffman Keener, '05, Wm. Kulp, 
'12, Martin Brandt, '08, Martha Martin, 
'09, Mrs. F. L. Reber, '05, Elnia Brandt, 
'11, Carrie Hess, 08, Walter Eshelman, 
'12. 




"Turn him and see his threads; look if 

he be 
Friends to himself, that would be 

friend to thee ; 
For that is first required, a man be his 

own ; 
But he that's too much that is friend 

to none." Ben Jonson. 

We gratefully acknowledge the fol- 
lowing January exchanges : The Ur- 
sinus Weekly, The Carlisle Arrow. 
The Lafayette Weekly, The Blue and 
White, Pottstown, Pa., The Alliance, 
The Red and Black. The Mirror, 
Juniata Echo, The Blue and White, 
Hammonton H. S., College Rays, Nor- 
mal Vidette, The Hall Boy, The Nor- 
mal School Herald, The Purple and 
White, Allentown, Pa., The Albright 
Bulletin, The Owl, Linden Hall Echo, 
The Purple and Gold, The Collegian, 
The Hebron star, The Susquehanna, 
Delaware College Review, The Patter- 
sonian, The Gordonian, The Dickin- 
sonian, Purple and White, Phoenix- 
ville H. S., The Pharetra, Oak Leaves. 
The Philomathean Monthly, The Pal- 
merian. High School Impressions, The 
High School Journal, The Daleville 
Leader.— Welcome, come again. 

M. H. Aerolith. We wish to commend 
you on your splendid literary depart- 



ment. The Article entitled "Uber 
Mittel-America," portrays a vi\id de- 
scription of the religious conditions of 
those republics. The discussion of 
"The Rubber Industry" is very in- 
structive. The story of "A Day on the 
Island with Robinson Crusoe" is in- 
teresting and original but how was it 
possible to have the same ship half- 
burnt one day and onh' slightly burnt 
the second day? 

High School News, of Lancaster, is 
very neatly arranged. Cuts are very 
suggestive. Your literary department 
as a whole, deserves praise. In your 
exchange notes, tells us what you think 
of the different college and High 
School papers. 

The Bulletin, Wells High School, 
Steubenville, Ohio. A few literary 
articles, please. Locals very extensive 
and good. 

We like the originality of your liter- 
ary articles. Your paper has a neat and 
attractive appearance. A few things 
that might interest some of your read- 
ers are: Alumni Notes, Society News, 
Table of Contents, and several sugges - 
tivc cuts. 

Thi- f'oshcn College Record gives a 
good acc' unt of the proceedings of the 
college. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



e BEE HIVE STORE 



For 
DRY GOODS 

and 
NOTIONS 

RAIN €OATS 

and 
UMBRELLAS 



Shoes, Etc 
"Something New Every Day 



c?^ ^ 




CONDUCTED ON SANITARY PRIN- 

ciPLLS 13 th:: 

RALPH CKOSS 
Shaving Parlor 

Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. 
None Better. Few as Good. 

D. V\. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN 

The baker who knows how. Phone or drop 

a postal. 

BISHOP'S STODIO 

PHOTOS OF ALL STYLES 

FRAMING NEATLY EXECUTED 
Kodaks and Films for sale. Amateur 
Finishing Solicited. Work Guaranteed. 

Centre Square. 

LEO KOB 

Heating and 

Plumbing 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



SWEATERS 
UNDERWEAR 
HOSIERY 
NECKWEAR 

and 
FANCY 

GOODS 

A. A. ABELE, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

The Pratt 
Teacliers' Agency 

70 Fifth Avenue 
New York 

Receives calls at all seasons for col- 
lege and normal graduates, spe:ialists 
and other teachers in oo'leges, public 
and private schools in all parts of tlie 
t ountry. 
Advises parents about tchools. 

WM. O. PRATT, Manager. 
Plain Suits Reao'y-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats 

CANSMAN'a 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange Sts. 
LANCASTER, PA. 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Athletic Goods 



Kodaks and supplies of all kinds al- 
ways on hand in the famous Eastman 
quality. Don't forget us when in need 
of supplies for in or out door sports. 

HARRY K. DORSHEIMER 

E.xclusive agency for Hopewell Choc- 
olate Dainties. 

School Supplies. Cutlery 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



G.Wm.REISNERi 

Manufacturing | 

Jeweler i 

College Jewelry of the Getter Sort. B 
Class Pins and Rings, Prize Cups, Fra- g 
ternity Jewelry, Medals. = 

Watches Diamonds Jewelry J 

120 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. g 

i?nittiBiiiMi)iiiBiiiiM!iiiniiiiiaiiiiniiiiiBiiiiiaiiiiiBiiiiBniiniiiiiBiiiiin 

CENTRAL 
MEAT MARKET 

All Kinds of Choice 

Fresh and Smoked Meats. 

H. H. GOOD, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



WE DO IT RIGHT 



Shoe Repairing 



S. K. BARNES & SON 



F. T. MUTH H. M. MUTH '. 

MUTH BROS. ] 



iLUMBERo 



of building material 
Slate and Cement, 
IS Fertilizer, Patent 

tt Plaster Board.etc. 
GrJAIN, FEED, ETC. 

c you a square dpal 
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Franklin and Marshall 
College, Lancaster, Pa. 

LANCASTER, PA. 
Offers liberal courses in 

ARTS and SCIENCES. 

Campus of fifty-four acres with ten 

buildings including Gymnasium and 

complete Athletic Field, 

For catalogue apply to 

HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 



F. DISSINGER and H. H. CARMAN 



Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 



F. D. CROFF & Br?0, 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



Also all kin 
and mill work 
"Wheeler 



S re 



Carry 
This Pen 
Upside Down . 



— if you want to. Yes, in any posi- 
tion, any pocket. 

Boys: carry the Parker Jack Knife 
Pen in your troiuers pocket along 

Girls: carrir it in the pocket of 



-basketball. 
I the iob the 



COAL, 

We ai 
that wi ' 
ship. 



leaving a pinhcad spot of 
where it has been carried. 

Write? Ju« im-.gine a pen of 
pUss that melts to ink as you si d :i 
acrosspapcrl That'tLScwayitwii; .-. 

Price$2.50up. GetoneonU):! 
7 .ke it buck any tine wiLi^jn .J 
dd— if you're not tickled to death 
w. lit. We authorize dealrf to rc- 

Parkcrs, write us for catalog loJou. 



ARKER 



JdCk Ksii tr Safety 



PEN -i^r 



■3-Vl"M-l>+**^' 



28 Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 



Seven Reasons : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 



Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Motions 



North East Corner Centre Square, 

JACOB HSHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler__ 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
With you for 35 years. THAT'S ALL 

i Lehman & Wolgemuthf 
COAL I 

; WOOD, GRAIiV, FEED, FLCUR J 

; Telephone ^ 

; ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENN'A ^ 



FURNITURE 

F. C. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENN'A 

Ctias. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



W. R. Ashenfelter 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 



Weddings and Parties supplied -with 
Fancy Cakes at Short Notice. 




ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING. 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

URSINUS COLLEGE, Collegevllle, Pa. 

(24 miles from Philadelphia) 
Group system of instruction. University 
trained faculty. High standards of scholar- 
ship. Athletics encouraged but controlled. 
No fraternites or exclusive clubs. Strong 
Christian influences. New dormitories and 
dining halls. Men and women admitted to 
nil :cv.r_cs. 

SUMMER SESSION 
Oldest and most inviting college summer 
school in Pennsylvania! College courses 
and preparatory studies. Teaching by heads 
of departments. Large shaded campus and 
cool buildings. Terms low. 
GEORGE LESLIE OMWAKE, Pd.D., Pres. 

ELIZABETHTOWN DENTAL PARLORS 

Office Closed Thursday 

and Friday. 

S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 



We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 

Y. M. C. A. BIdg., LANCASTER, PA. 

MpiiiiiBiiiiiaiiiiiaiiiiiaiiiiiaiiiiiaiiiiiniiiiBii::;Biiiiiaiiii:aKH!iiiiBiiiK 

Ih. H. BRANDT I 



I ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL | 
i SLATE and ROOFING PAPER I 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 

iiffiliiBTllllirniaiiiiiaiffiHiiiBifl 



30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



We ELIZABEThTOWN HERALD 



$1.00 A 
Estimates on any kind of Job Printing. 



J. N. OLWEILER 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 




Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



DENTIST 

GEO. K. KERSEY 

Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. W. CAIN 

Store Adjoining Federal Room 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - - - PENN'A 



JOHN A. FISHER 

BARBER 

Centre Square, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

P«lllKlinilllSi<'.imillBlu'iBlinillllBIIIHIIIIBllll:B!llia'.-iBiii||m 

I JOS. H. RIDER & SON I 

i AGENCY FOR | 

i I 

I SPALDING'S I 

I I 

I Baseballi Tennis Goods! 
I I 



Linotyping for the Trade. 



The place to buy 
Stationery, Pennants, Souvenir Goods, Post 
Cards, and hundreds of articles for your 
pleasure and convenience. Our candies are 
always fresh. LAWRY-S VARIETY STORE,- 
Half Block S. of Center Sq., Elizabethtown^ 

CDogfgfS Hardware Store 

The best there is in hardware at the 
lowest possible prices. Prompt and cour» 
teous service. TRY US. 



D. B. KLINE 

CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Ellzabethtown, Pa, 

^▼^▼♦♦▼♦♦♦▼▼^♦♦v## ■*'^ ▼♦♦♦♦< ♦♦♦♦ 

CEO. A. FISHER % 

Hardware | 

Phonographs \ 

And ^ 

Records 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PA 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Pe«t Oradea of 

FLOUR AND FiiKD 

Highest t'asli l>n.c« ..«iil for ni:. 
Inn s\ni\ sf'nw 
ELIZ.\liKTHTO\V\. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



•^•""^um^ ^ ^iiiu^"ifi^iirN««iiiii^iiiii^iiiii^ ■■t'lii^ii'i^urM^iiiii^riiii^illliaBJMli^rilMHlll.NlHlilll^lllWllllinnmilMHIIIIIHIIIII 

The Book Store 

I 

BOOKS, BIBLES, SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPPLIES f 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED I 

i 

G H. FALKEgySTEIBNS, Elizabethtown, Pa. • 



i«tB!!iiiaiii;iHiri!Wiiiiari.iai;miii!iBiiiiaiiiiin!uiBiiiiiBti 




BiiiiiBii!iHiiiiiiiiniHiiiiBi:iaiiiiniiiiBiiiiwiianiiniiiiHiiiiniiiiiniiiiBii 



MIE&SE'S BCE CREAM 

adds ZEST to the MEAL 

Sold in Elizabethtown by 

J. S. GROSS. 

IPaintinQ anb {paper 

Ibancjing 

kN\r>S B. DRACE 



Seven ttiousand people buy WALK- * 

OVER shoes every day — certainly * 

there must be much merit in a shoe % 

to attain such popularity — T 

In addition to the better quality of * 

our shoes we offer our better man- 4. 

ner of serving you. || 

WALK-OVER * 

SHOE GTORE % 

HUNTZBERGER-WINTERS CO. * 

Department Store % 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'A | 

♦ * 



I Spalding Sporting Goods I 



4, Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, T 

|| Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic * 

J Shoes. Kodaks and Cameras, de- 4> 

4i veloping and finishing. ^ 

t H.B.HERR * 

I 30-32 West King Street * 

% LANCASTER, PA. * 
.* 



; Est. 1884 Est. 1884 K 

KIRK JOHNSON CS, CO. | 

Pianos, Player-Pianos, Victrolas, Sheet Music, Musical Mdse. || 
16-18 W. King Street. LANCASTER, PA. 



32 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Elizabethtown Exchange 
Bank 



Transacts a general banking business. 

Pays interest on time deposits. 

Solicits your patronage. 



OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President. ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice. Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



DIRECTORS 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
H. J. Gish 



Jos. G. Heisey 
Dr. H. K. Blough 
Henry E. Landis 
E. Hernley 



J. H. Buch 
Dr. A. M. Kalbach 
Geo. D. Boggs 
3. H. Greider 



TAKE YOUR 

Laundry to Fisher's | 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morn- 
ing. Returns Wednesday & Friday afternoon | 



Ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 
Catalogues a Specialty 



D. G. BRINSER 

^ I Grain, Flour, Feed, 

in CI I Seeds, Hay, Straw 
UUUl and Fertilizer. 

Bell & Ind. Phcrr 

Rheems, - - Pa. 



311 W. Grant St., 



LANCASTER, PA. 



i O. N. HEISEY 

I 

I Provisions, Groceries and Choice Candies 



HEISEY BUILDING 



ELIZABETHyWN, PA. 



ICIIBiilBliW'.- V" s«!n w 



0^'^^A/;S 




riie Line Fence 5 

Know Thyself 6 

Home, Sweet Home 8 

Standing Alone 10 

The Sale of a Winton Six-Cylinder 12 

The Achievement of Success 13 

Editorials 15 

Athleticism 15 

School Notes 19 

K. L. S. Notes 21 

Homerian Literary Society 22 

Alumni 23 

Exchanges 24 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 




HERTZLER'S 
Department Store 

Your needs supplied at satisfactory 
prices in Dry Goods, Groceries, Ready- 
to-Wear Clothing for Men and Women 
of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oil- 
cloth, Shoes, etc. 

Polite attention. Square ( 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 



CLOTHING 

International Tailoring Co., N. Y. 

American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chi- 
cago. 
Up-to-Date Samples on Hand. 



Black Cat 

Hosiery hertzler bros. & co. 

Ce>tre Sqaare EllZabethtOWn, PS. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pros. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits, $164,000 



General Accounts Solicited. Interest Paid on Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent. 

DIRECTORS 



V. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strlckler 


Peter N. Rutt 


\ W. Groff. 


J. S. Risser 


B. L. Geyer 


:. C. Ginder 


Amoe G. Coble 


E. H. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



iiiiniiiiBiiiiBiiiiBiiiaiiiiiBiiiHaiipaiiDHiiiiBiiiimiBiiiiBiiiiBD 
BUCHANAN & YOUNG j 

115 & 117 N. Queen St., 1 

LANCASTER, - PENN'A 1 



Distinctive Styles 

In 

Coats, Suits, Dresses, 
and Waists 

Whether it is a Coat, Dress or 
Waist, you are sure to find our sty'es 
distinctive, we mean authorative 
styles that duplicate the mode with- 
out going to the extreme, for they 
are always in good taste. 

Coats and Suits 

In Misses Suits and Coats, Spring 
heralds her coming with many charm- 
ing conceptions here, each of which 
asserts style correctness in no un- 
certain way, there is a "touch and go" 
a "smartness" — about the lines and 
new ideas that are most effective and 
becoming. 

Dresses at the Style Store 

Cool, fresh, danty Dresses with a 
stylish dash of co or that gives a m 
pretty finish to neck, waist and' bor- 
der, distinguished, charming models 
in Silks, Lingerie Dresses now invite 
critical inspection, YOUR inspection, 
young lady. 

Waists that ill elieve the ever- 
lasting monotcnv ;in 1 sameness, dis- 
tinctvie. new modf in smart effects 
that will beco"'e ;■ rprisingly large 
nmber of "iris -• "ek exclusive- 
ness of styles 




Centre Square, Next to City Hall 
LANCASTER, PA. 

There since 1854 and the only 
clothing house in Lancaster that 
has one price to all and dis- 
counts to none. 

READY-TO-WEAR 

AND 
MADE-TO-ORDER 

CLOTHING 

Men's and Boys' 

FURNISHINGS 

We Are Among the Largest Man- 
facturers of 

Pi«"~ Snits 

AND OVERCOATS and BROAD- 
FALL PANTS 



I 




in this country. 
See O-jr Al'-Wool Suit? at 

$1?.00. $n."" «;' .00 and $15.00 



Students Will Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



IMPORTANT I 



•^Ir 



STUDENTS! I 



DO YOU KNOW THAT 

It is only because of the kind patronage of our business and 
our professional men in this town and elsewhere, that this maga- 
zine exists. They have indeed shown themselves friends of Our 
College and of "Our College Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to 
buy anything, to consider first those who by their advertising 
have r.-;ade this magazine possible. 

We have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all 
respect:;. 

Business Manager of "Our College Times." 



it ^ ^ fln m ^ m^ ^^ I mt^ y m< ^ ftfi wm * ^f f« i»i^| ^ » ' — ^ / ^ wi^| ^ » mttjffmt ij<^| ^ 



i 



READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



I First Showing 

I OF THE NEW 

I Fall Shoes 



W"KI I I ♦♦ ♦♦■ | .. > . H i. | .. n ..| ♦ I ». H .. l . .!.♦♦♦ 



g Every Style — every wanted 

I Leather — every new shape 

I — is here, ready for your in- 

■ spection. Will you stop in 

■ to see them today ? 

I LYNCH & EBY 

i "No Shoes Over $3.00" 

m 24 North Queen St., 

I LANCASTER, - PENN'A 



ADVERTISE 



'OUR COLLEGE TIMES" 



•***4* **** lt't** * * * ************ 



(§m (Haik^ ©tmw 



Elizabkthtown, Pa., Maruu, 1914 



The Line Fence 

John Kuhns 



James Hale and Silas Iran were boy- 
hood friends. As young men they had 
taken adjoining farms. James Hale 
was good-natured and charitable, while 
Silas Iren was selfish and miserly. The 
great difference in their characters 
seemed to draw them together. One 
day, however, their friendly relations 
with each other suddenly ceased. 

They had decided to build a line 
fence l;etween their respective mead- 
ows to prevent the intermingling of 
their herds. As neither knew where 
the line separating the meadows 
should be, they decided to have it sur- 
veyed. \\'hen it was surveyed and 
properly staked oflf, it remained so for 
several weeks before any men could 
be employed to make the fence. 

During this time a mischievous boy, 
whom Silas had punished for raiding 
his orchard, passed that way and de- 
cided, when he saw the row of stakes, 
"t'l get even" with him by pulling out 
>c\eral where the row made a sharp 
turn upon James Hale's land. The 
two farmers did not pay any special 
attention to the new fence until sev- 
eral weeks after the fence was built 
because they knew the men \vhom 
they had employed to be experienced 
and trustworthy. 

On a certain morning, however, it 



happened that these two men met, 
Silas coming from the meadow and 
James going for the first time to look 
at the fence. 

James was about to say. "good 
morning," when Silas strode up to him 
and began hotly to accuse him of 
changing the line and stealing some 
land. James's apparent ignorance of 
it only increased Silas's suspicions so 
that he began to pour out his wrath 
upon the head of his friend without 
giving him time to explain and left 
James with the threat, "I will never 
speak to you again," Several times 
after this James Hale tried to clear 
himself before his former friend but 
e\ery time Silas Iren turned his back 
and walked away, finally James Hale 
gave up in despair. 

Year after year rolled by for fifteen 
years without either of the men speak- 
ing a word to the other. Many of 
their children had married and had 
gone away. The hair of both men was 
beginning to turn silver, yet it brought 
no change in the attitude of the two 
old men toward each other. The line 
fence, which they had built, rotted 
down and was neither repaired nor re- 
placed. 

During these years what had be- 
come of the bov that had caused all 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



this? Soon after the prank, the boy 
had moved away and had gone to a 
Normal School. After leaving school 
he had taught, not because it was 
necessary for him to support himself, 
for his father was rich, but because he 
preferred it to spending his life in idle- 
ness. He had returned to the scenes 
of his boyhood and was now teaching 
the district school where he had gone 
in his boyhood. At a certain spelling- 
bee held in his school he had met 
Susan Iren, and thereafter he was a 
frequent visitor at the Iren homestead. 
Susan was not averse to this young 
man, so their courtship progressed 
rapidly. One evening he decided to 
propose but after considering for some 
time he had decided to ask her father 
first and at the same time confess his 
act which he had committed fifteen 
years before. When he asked Silas 
Iren for the hand of his daughter, he 
received the old man's hearty approval 



but when he spoke of his boyhood 
prank, the old man turned pale and 
held out his tremulous hand for sup- 
port. After he had remained silent 
for several minutes, Silas Iren said 
brokenly, "Oh! If I had only known 
this." 

That evening James Hale, after 
doing his work, sat upon his porch to 
enjoy the evening breeze. As he sat 
there he saw Silas Iren coming up 
the road. He got up and started to 
walk toward the road to meet his 
friend of bygone days. As they came 
nearer to each other Silas raised his 
head and said huskily, "James, I was 
wrong." 

James extended his hand and re- 
plied, "I knew you would come some- 
time, Silas." 

And then the two old men fervently 
clasped hands in the moonlight, and in 
tears forgave each other. 



Know Thyself 

George C. Capetanios. 



Socrates, who believed in the im- 
mortality of the soul and in a Ruler of 
the universe, believed that the proper 
study of mankind is man, his favorite 
maxim being, "Know Thyself." This 
maxim needs to be repeated to every 
generation and as long as man has not 
obtained perfect knowledge of himself, 
of the universe about him, and of the 
immortality of the soul. 

The grandest and noblest of God's 
creatures in the entire world is man. 
God gave him intelligence, gave him 
moral sense, gave him a spiritual 



nature. These qualities elevate him 
above all other creatures of God's crea- 
tion. Without these he is not quali- 
fied to rule over the lower forms of 
creation. His intellectual, moral, and 
spiritual endowments make him a 
rightful lord over all creation. 

No man can claim an adequate 
knowledge of himself who does not 
know himself physically. We must 
know those sacred laws which God 
has ordained in the human body, in 
order that we may be able to control 
it, guide it, and i-ecp it pure. When- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ever our lower nature rules the higher, 
we come to the same level with the 
rest of the animals, and God never in- 
tended that the lower nature should 
rule the higher. The body is the 
dwelling place of the Holj- Spirit and 
tiierefore we must know how to keep 
it as clean and as vigorous as possible. 
Tiic man who would do anything and 
CNcrything against the vitality of his 
body to gain wealth or wisdom has not 
yet found himself physically. Why is 
it that a great number of people sufifer 
from diseases and physical defects? 
Ts it not because they do not obey the 
laws of nature? These diseases which 
mean death to moral character and to 
the physical and intellectual powers of 
the people are largely the result of 
their ignorance of the body. When a 
man violates the laws of nature he 
must suffer the penalty. God may for- 
gi\c a man but nature never does. And 
it is time that we should awake to see 
the price that we are paying as the 
result of our ignorance of our own 
selves. Our mothers and fathers have 
kept from us those very things which 
we should have known in our youth, 
and instead of pointing out to us the 
dangers that lie along our pathway 
and forewarning us against them they 
ha\-c with their good intentions left us 
in ignorance. 

Not only do we need to know our- 
selves physically but mentally also. 
A\'e need to study ourselves intellect- 
ually in order that we may discover 
the tricks that our mind is playing 
upon us. In order to keep evil in- 
tentions out of our minds it is neces- 
sary that we know and are able to pre- 
vent the inind from inviting evil 
thoughts. We cannot alwavs choose 



our society and have with us just the 
jjeople that we would like to have, 
but we can choose our thoughts and 
they can be good visitors or insidious 
enemies, contributing to our happiness 
or else poisoning the fountain from 
which flows our brightest joys. 

We need to study ourselves in order 
that we may learn the power of 
thought. No one can estimate the 
power of thought in art, in science, in 
literature, in philosophy, and in any 
other line of human endeavor. Ever)'- 
thing that man has accomplished in 
this world first had its origin in the 
mind, and in order that we may stand 
upon our feet and think for ourselves, 
we must understand and develop the 
power of our thought and our imagin- 
ation. Homer and Milton could never 
have dreamed the sublimest poems of 
the ages had they not understood them 
selves- and developed their imagination. 
Our minds were never meant to be 
squirrels in cages or electric fans. We 
ought to get outside of landmarks, 
earmarks, and book-marks once in 
awhile. Our minds were never de- 
signed to find nourishment in things 
that are of practically no value, but 
they were intended to feed upon the 
best things in life and to roam at large 
throughout the whole field of human 
interest and be lifted upon the hills and 
beyond the hills to the stars. 

But even though we know ourselves 
physically and mentally, and do not 
know ourselves spirituall}^ we are 
still "r mintr 'n the darkness. How 
far s,.,..i Lhe world falls in this point! 
How few of earth's millions do really 
believe in their heart of hearts, in the 
immortality of the soul? How many 
have made the distinction between the 



8 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



animal life and the life that God has 
given to the human being? We have 
never yet found ourselves, unless we 
have a definite conception of the im- 
mortality of the soul. The life of the 
animal is limited, but in the life of man 
there is no limitation, and when we 
began living we commenced an eternal 
life. Whenever we come to believe that 
we were created in the image af a lov- 
ing, living God for some noble purpose 



in the ages of eternity; whenever we 
shall have an adequate knowledge of 
the Word of God; whenever we shall 
come to believe through the light of 
the Word of God, which like a mirror, 
reveals to us our ownselves as God 
sees us, then death will appear to us 
but a door to a higher existence. We 
then may assure ourselves that we 
know ourselves, at least in part as God 
knows us. 



Home, Sweet Home 



Anna Cassel 



Of all the words in our vocabulary 
there are few that are so dear to us as 
the word "home." What a rush of 
pleasant thoughts and fond memories 
are aroused in our consciousness when 
we think of our homes! We love to 
sing the songs of home, and we stand 
enraptured before the picture, "Home, 
Sweet Home." 

This painting portrays an aged 
father and a mother sitting by the fire 
on a cold stormy night. It is the 
night of the dying of the old year. 
On one side of the table sits Mother 
knitting, on the opposite side sits the 
Father reading the newspaper. He 
reads portions of it aloud to his dear 
companion, but after awhile she gives 
no response and when he looks up he 
sees that she has ceased to knit and is 
in deep meditation, while two large 
tears are slowly rolling down over her 
cheeks. He asks no questions for he 
knows that this night, of all the nights 
in the year, she yearns most for her 
dear ones who are all away from home. 



The Father has no interest in his paper 
after this and soon it falls to the floor 
unheeded. 

There is a long silence. Good, faith- 
fful Fido comes from under the stove 
and lays his head lovingly on his 
master's knee. He seems to know 
that they are lonely and wishes to ex- 
press his mute sympathy. Thus the 
three companions sit in silence into the 
night. 

The Father and the Mother are busy 
with their own thoughts. To each it 
seems but a few years since their 
children were all at home with them, 
and in memory they go over the years 
as one by one they left their happy 
home. 

Far away in a large city lives their 
first-born, their Alice. The Mother 
remembers so well how she felt when 
the family circle was broken ; when 
the young doctor, to whom .Mice had 
vowed to be faithful, took her away 
from home, but now she rejoices that 
Alice has a happy hi>uic of her own 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and se\eral bright healthy children, 
and longs to see the baby only a few 
months old, who bears its grand- 
mother's name, Kathryn. 

Tlu-y remember another day, — the 
day when Henry the oldest boy left 
Iifime to go into the arm\-. Their 
>()irits were crushed, and their hearts 
well-nigh broken then, and to-night 
after ten years the wound still seems 
open and bleeding. True, he has made 
a good record and enjoys his work, 
but the fond Mother has read between 
the lines of his letters and knows that 
lie is not always warm and comfort- 
able. The Father feels sure that to- 
night as his son sits by his camp-fire 
his thoughts are of home, and silently 
he breathes a pra3'er to the Omnipres- 
ent Father for his boy in the far-away 
islands. 

Together they think of their kind- 
hearted, gentle Emma. It seems so 
long since she has been at home and 
has ministered to them, but they glad- 
ly give her up when they remember 
how many she has helped and soothed 
in their dying hour. They thank God 
for her life of patient service, and her 
self-sacrifice for the sick and suffering 
in the crowded city. 



To the Father it seems only a few 
days since he took his youngest boy 
with him to the field and gave him his 
first lessons in ploughing and other 
agricultural pursuits. How he had 
planned the life of the boy, and had 
hoped that he would stay with them 
always and be their comfort in their 
declining years ! But the boyish heart 
longed for the sea and the Father re- 
counts the man}- entreaties and per- 
suasions they both used in trying to 
keep him at home, but to no avail, 
and how reluctantly they gave their 
consent. Now he had been away from 
them for three years. To-night as the 
wind howls around the house they 
have grave fears for their baby boy. 
With eager anticipation they look 
forward and pray fervently that he 
may be spared to spend his first fur- 
lough with them in the near future. 

The good old Father and the aged 
Mother do not repine in being thus 
left alone, but to-night they long to 
have their dear ones spend New Year 
with them as they did in years gone by, 
but since it cannot be, the\' lift their 
hearts in praise to their Maker for 
giving them children who are an honor 
to them and a credit to the home in 
which thev were so carefuUv reared. 



^^?^?^:^' 



Standing Alone 



Sara C. Shisler 



The man witli a character founded 
on truth, courage, integrity, right, and 
independence, is he who can stand 
without the prop of popularity, or any 
other uncertain appendage of the 
framework of public sentiment. How 
many people stand alone? A large 
number do not stand at all, some lean 
on others, and a few apparently stand 
alone, but when a slight breeze blows 
against the first classes, they find 
themselves unsupported and a sudden 
fall, which nobody can understand, en- 
sues. How can we tell that we are 
able to stand alone? 

In the educational world men rise 
so rapidly sometimes that they become 
very famous in a short time. Great 
and wonderful do they appear to the 
public eye. However, when they are 
no longer held on the pinnacle of fame, 
they become helpless, discouraged, and 
lack ambition because their aim was 
not service but the honor of men. 

Let us consider Robert Burns, the 
man who possessed the possibilities of 
becoming far greater tlian he ever was. 
Discontent in his allotted sphere, he 
was counteracted by sudden populari- 
ty, a time during which he was a won- 
der to the public gaze. However the 
curiosity lessened, instead of being 
manly and exhibit ing his grit,of work- 
ing against adversity, he fell so low 
that he actually disgraced his profes- 
sion. 

In tlie ])i)lttical world we also need 
men who know and support what is 
right and necessary for the welfare of 
the masses. A man who is popular 



and turns with the tide of every-day 
affairs, and who has not the interest of 
the people at heart, is likely to be un- 
dermined by the first opposition. Any 
individual that must solicit the support 
of others in upholding his ideas, is 
weak compared with him, who by his 
promises in the right shows his capa- 
bility of standing alone, even though 
others are not willing to support his 
measures. 

Where is a man more able to stand 
than George Washington was? Like 
a child resisting the demands of an 
unjust father, he was not afraid to face 
England or any other country, because 
he felt justified in securing that liberty 
to which the Americans were entitled. 
The secret of his stability lay in the 
resoluteness, virtue, sincerety, and ear- 
nestness of his character. 

Likewise, Abraham Lincoln struck 
the final blow at slavery and thereby 
risked the dissolution of the United 
States. He rose to fame and honor, 
not by fraud or any base means, but by 
his own merits. This instance shows 
that those working with the banner of 
right above them, always subdue evil. 
Hence, every one whose soul is satu- 
rated with the necessary qualities of 
making a man can stand when the 
test comes. 

Then, again, many people of good 
character prove to be weak when ad- 
versity comes. Going down and then 
attempting to rise again is more dif- 
ficult than to face adverse things nobly 
and become victor in the beginning, 
for "the gold that is refined in the 



* 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



h(3ttest furnace comes out the purest." 
The majority of men worthy of ado- 
ration rose in spite of adversity. 

Also in the spiritual life, it is easy to 
live a pure and holy life when living 
among good people. The danger is in 
yielding to temptation when every- 
thing seems to turn the wrong way. 
Peter was sure that he could stand 
alone ; yet when the test came, it re- 
quired more courage than he had. 
However, he did not remain down, 
but arose again and was stronger than 
before. 

Then, too, no nation falls until its 
citizens indulge in luxury and vice to 
such an extent that thej' are incapable 
of giving their best, and finally nothing 
at all towards the advancement of the 
interests of their country. What ac- 
counts for liquor and all other vice irk 
our nation or anj' nation? There are 
always those who lack the depth of 
character necessary to understand the 
charming invitation of the danger-pits 
in life. If then the strong of a nation 
do not concentrate all the fire of their 
possibilities on something definite to 
uphold the right, the nation must suf- 
fer. 

Probalily the moral world requires 
the most courage. The twentieth 
century requires pluck because the 
agents of evil encounter us everv- 



where. The saloon, the gambling den, 
and other degrading places are con- 
tinuously beckoning to everybody that 
passes. A person who cannot resist 
the enticement of the sign above the 
door falls as a consequence of the lack 
of courage to say "no." 

God created each person for some 
definite purpose. That work may be 
something in which self-reliance and 
independence of purpose are the only 
resorts. Nevertheless, that work will 
remain undone if the person leans on 
another for help. Since there are many 
people who fail on account of a very 
limited foundation on which they 
started the structure of their life, we 
should all strive to pull others into the 
sunshine of freedom. 

No man who is incapable of stand- 
ing alone is free. Every individual is 
endowed with the power to choose and 
also with a conscience to help him feel 
the Tightness of an act. If a man feels 
certain that he is right, there is no 
reason why he should not be able to 
stand. Milton says, "Virtue could see 
to do what Virtue would by her own 
radiant light, though sun and moon 
were in the fiat sea sunk." Conse- 
quently, the person who possesses self- 
reliance, sincerity, and honesty of 
heart, and wishes to serve rather than 
be served, can stand alone. 



The Sale of a Winton Six-Cylinder 



Owen Hershey 



Did you say that the \^'i^tOIl Six- 
Cylinder Touring Car was a failure? 
You say so because you have not ex- 
amined its mechanism very closely. 
Le us examine this car for a moment. 

Now this machine has all the mod- 
ern conveniences with which automo- 
biles are equipped. See, you must not 
leave your seat to crank the car; all 
that you need to do is press this button 
and when you want to shift your gears 
you have no levers with which to be- 
come confused; simply press the dif- 
ferent buttons and the gears shift auto- 
matically. If you are driving along 
and night overtakes you it is not nec- 
essary to stop and have the incon- 
venience of getting out into the mud 
or of trying to light your lamps in a 
strong wind. Turn the switch and 
you will have light. You can regulate 
the light to a very bright or 
a dim light. When a tire is punctured 
the quick detachable tire and the elec- 
trical air-pump will make the task so 
easy and brief that you will not have 
to become angry. All of these con- 
veniences are operated by electricity 
which is generated by the machine 
when it is in motion. Do you still 
think the machine is a failure? 

Ah ! I see you are not yet satisfied. 
Perhaps it is the beauty of the car 
which you contemplate. I think I can 
truthfully say that for graceful lines 
and ea.sy motion there is no car that 
surpasses this one. If you do not like 
the shade, that alone would be a small 
matter to overcome as we can furnish 
vou the same kind of a car in any 



color. As for power and speed it is 
second to none with its six cylinders 
which have a bore of four inches. The 
car can without any great effort attain 
a speed of seventy miles an hour which 
sjjeed I am confident will satisfy your 
highest desire. Even with her tre- 
menduous weight and speed the car 
rides very easy because you see it has, 
instead of steel springs, an air cushion 
which absorbs the shocks and jars 
with great ease and makes the riding 
seem like being rocked in a cradle. 

.Are you still not convinced? Maybe 
you have forgotten to look up the re- 
cords of these cars and think that 
they do not last very long. This car 
in which we arc seated has covered 
forty thousand miles and is still in con- 
dition to cover half that many miles 
without any radical repairs. W^here is 
another car of which the same thing 
can be said? There is none. This is 
no exceptional car either, they all show 
very well and anyone who has one of 
these cars will corroborate my state- 
ments. 

The car is comparatively cheap ; the 
list price is only twenty-five hundred 
dollars, and since you are a prominent 
merchant I will give you a discount of 
five hundred dollars with a credit of 
one year for the balance. That is a 
fair proi)osition and I am sure you will 
never be sorry if you purchase one of 
our cars. Think of the pleasure and 
joy yi>u would bring to your wife and 
children. You say, yes? There, I 
knew y.m would buy one. 



The Achievement of Success 



I. Z. Hackman 



Someone lias asked, "What is suc- 
cess?"' This question is answered very 
dift'erently, l)ut a writer once said 
that it is the reward of all honest toil. 
We hear much about success nowa- 
days. As life becomes larger and 
more fully revealed we also hear and 
learn more, we believe, of service. And 
learn more, we believe, of service, and 
every one seems either to be striving 
earnestly for success or endeavoring 
eagerly to tell others how to achieve it. 

To the one striving for success, the 
means seem either too simple to be 
sure, or too self-sacrificing to be worth 
the end sought. To the one teaching 
how to achieve success, the way seems 
clear, the end certain. Then after 
analyzing and carefully examining the 
many and various recei-its offered far 
and wide, we can, by the many success 
advisers compared to the many more 
success seekers, conclude that the sub- 
stance of most of them can pretty 
nearh- be encompassed within a word, 
the magic word, — service. 

Every human being starting out in 
life to become a force that will be a 
contrilniti<)n to the welfare or woe of 
the world, should ask himself this 
question : "What shall I give the world 
in service of mind or muscle in return 
for the comforts, blessings, and lux- 
uries T expect to receive from it?" Too 
many with a vitally wrong conception 
of their relation to the world and with 
no thought of duty and responsibility, 
turn this question round by asking: 



"How much can I get from the world 
with the smallest amount of effort?" 
We see these culls of humanity every- 
where representing the little end of 
nothing. They measure what they 
give in faithful, honest service very 
sparingly, but they are ever on the 
alert to bring every influence to bear 
to secure an increase of salary with- 
out increasing their efforts. 

Again, true success means true ser- 
vice. The successful boy or girl is the 
serviceable boy or girl. They are the 
ones who achieve something, not only 
with money, but with their own brains 
and hands. If they have money we 
will find if we look carefully, that suc- 
cess has brought money with its other 
greater blessings, and not that money 
has brought success. 

Are you successful? Then you are 
serviceable. Do you work to win suc- 
cess? Then begin by being of service 
to-day, to yourself and to others. And 
this service means not merely to be 
earnest and honest and ambitious, but 
it means to do well that which you 
can do to-day, and not to-morrow. 

.Vgain, the opportunity to do some- 
thing to-day, means as it always has 
meant, the chance to do something 
timely, worth while, and necessary. It 
means, as it ever has meant and ever 
must mean, the perception of some 
duty and its performance, and usually 
as a duty rather than with the hope of 
some reward, whether it be financial or 
otherwise. 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



Success then, in short, means not 
some big, dim, far-off desire, but it 
means ever-present duty to yourself 
and your surroundings. It has a 
beginning and that beginning is now, 
not to-morrow; the secret lies in doing 
well this task, not the next, which, 
like to-morrow, is never certain, but 
is ever a barrier in the mind of the one 
who never achieves much. Then to 
the successful student is the one who 
to-day learns the fundamentals of the 
lesson, and who persistently tugs away 
at difficult problems. 

In conclusion, then, if we practice 
the foregoing, we will give the world 
the assurance of a man ; a gift that is 



in the power of every one to make, 
and that should be the highest aspira- 
tion of every young man who is bind- 
ing on his armor to take his place in 
human warfare. The hope of a man 
lies in his honesty of purpose, correct 
motives, and manly conduct, and in a 
desire to give only the best to the 
cause of any noble achievement. We 
cannot all be equally lavish in what 
we give the world, but there is power 
in every one to give something,— a 
bright smile, a helpful, suggestion, or 
a timely warning if necessary. All 
these when brought into daily practise 
will urove that the positive life in the 
one worth living. 





EDITORIAL BOARD 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, Editor-in-Chief 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 



Mary G. Hershey. 
Orville Z. Becker. 
Nora L. Reber... 



. . . School Notes 
.Homerlan News 



J. D. Reber 

Isaac J. Kreider. 
J. H. Gingrich 



. . . .Alumni Notes 

Bxcnanges 

Business Manager 



Naomi Longenecker K. L. S. News Daisy P. Rider Art Editor 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year by Elizabethtowu 

College. 
This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their files, 

and arrearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates: — Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for ?2.00. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



Athleticism. 

The man who never sees a good qual- 
ity in one of his associates and yet is 
sure to find a bad trait is a cynic. He 
always sees a thorn in a bed of roses, 
and has an inveterate contempt for the 
opinions of others. He is a follower 
of Diogenes and his philosophy of 
life is embodied in the doctrine of 
cynicism. Then, there is the man who 
is actuated by an intemperate zeal in 
some cause. George Eliot says, "His 
enthusiasm is narrow and hoodwinked, 
so that he has no sense of propor- 
tions." Tills man is a fanatic. His 



unreasonably enthusiastic zeal, like 
that of the Crusaders, is termed fan- 
atitism. In opposition to these two 
classes of men, there may be found the 
man who is liberal in his views, and 
who disregards authority or the ordi- 
nary standards of thought. He aims 
at freedom and independence o f 
thought ; he is the free-thinker. His 
system of belief is named latitudina- 
rianism. 

Now what is athleticism? It is 
sports, or athletics, gone to seed. It 
is the grapevine, capable of producing 
luscious fruit, allowed to run wild. 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



and which may in time kill the very 
tree that supports it. The man who is 
so devoted to this frenzied zeal for 
athletics is possessed of the system of 
athleticism. So as not to take a cyni- 
cal attitude toward this question, and 
see only the baleful efifects of athlet- 
icism and not perceive some of its 
advantages; nor to refrain from ant 
exasperated zeal for relegating our 
present system of inter-collegiate ath- 
leticism to the realm of oblivion ; and 
also not be too latitudinarian in giv- 
ing assent to many benefits, as well as 
evils, will require a careful considera- 
tion of the subject of athleticism. 

We are positive that our college 
students need physical exercise in or- 
der to keep their bodies healthy, and 
we are convinced that nothing will so 
develop the body of a student as pro- 
per gymnastic exercises and outdoor 
sports. The question then remains: 
Shall this exercise be secured through 
inter-collegiate contests of by home 
athletics? We, as an institution, be- 
lieve that home athletics, or interclass 
and inter-society contests, are more 
conducive to the best interests of the 
students than inter-collegiate athlet- 
ics, and should, therefore, be encour- 
aged. We are aware that this is not 
the verdict of the majority of those 
concerned, and we do not expect a 
panegyric in return. It is truth we are 
seeking, and 
"Truth crushed to earth shall rise 

again ; 
But error, wounded, writhes in pain 
And dies amid its worshipers." 

Since we take this attitude on this 
question, it is natural for some one to 
ask why we advocate a system of 
home athletics.. 



We reply that athleticism is not in 
accord with true education, nor with 
the best interests of the students, 
nor with that high Christian character 
which an institution of learning should 
maintain. Sport ma}- be tolerated 
when it is for sport's sake, but when 
it tends to professionalism, and virtu- 
ally becomes the business of anyone, 
it becomes a menace to Christian man- 
hood. No man has a moral right to 
make a sport of any kind his pr.)fes- 
sion. Hence athleticism is not in keep- 
ing with sound ethical principles. 

As we delve into this question fur- 
ther we notice that athleticism is not 
the best system for the development 
of the body of the student. In our 
inter-collegiate contests only a meager 
percentage of the student body can 
participate. In a system of home ath- 
letics, by proper supervision, practi- 
cally all the students can share in the 
physical benefits of the contests. The 
rule for sports should be: The 
greatest good to the greatest number. 
It is also an incontrovertible fact that 
in a system of athleticism those who 
least need physical training get most 
of it, and those who need the most 
training get the least. Our institu- 
tions should not pose before the bar of 
civilization for the production of ath- 
letes, but for the harmonious de- 
velopment of the powers of man. A 
system of home athletics will require 
those who need the training to take 
part, and thus secure benefits to those 
who need such development. 

We further believe that the game of 
football as it is now played is too 
dangerous, especially in inter-collegi- 
ate contests, to be allowed by our 
colleges. When the death toll of young 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



men of promise reaches well nigh two 
score a year, it is time to rule out the 
game in our contests, or else radically 
change the game. We cannot, we must 
not, we dare not sanction this slaugh- 
ter of our j-ouths under the name of 
Christian education. Were one stu- 
dent killed by another in a fight be- 
fore twenty thousand people, the slay- 
er would be hanged, but yet a talented 
young man is frequently killed by 
foul play in a game of football and his 
slayer is allowed to go scot-free. And 
all this is termed by Christian educa- 
tion as an accident!. O the morals of 
athleticism ! The scenes of the Coli- 
seum are still to be found in America, 
civilized America, and the verdict of 
Christian Education is "Thumbs 
down !"■ Are we cynical and fanatical 
on this question? No, these are the 
indisputable facts of athleticism. 

Then, too, the genuine college stu- 
dent is not at school for the primary 
purpose of securing athletic training. 
To him athletics are secondary, and 
breadth and depth of mind and soul, 
primary. The keynote to success in 
the life of a student is concentration. 
This is impossible at times for the ma- 
jority of students during the tension 
that prevails before important inter- 
collegiate contests. We do not en- 
courage a student to be a book-worm 
but we do desire to inculcate in him a 
zeal for Shakespeare, Raphael, Edison, 
and Beethoven that shall at least equal 
that for a Plank, a Matthewson, or 
some favorite college athlete! The 
young man after graduation will be 
tested not by his dexterity in pitching 
baseball but by his capacity for work 
and his power to adapt himself to the 
issues of life. It is really robbery for 



an institution to demand a large part 
of a young man's time in preparation 
for, and participation in inter-collegi- 
ate athletics. Inefficient class-work 
must result from such a system not 
only from those who actually partici- 
pate but also from those whose minds 
and thoughts are centered on the con- 
tests. 

Here it may be objected that our 
average colleges are too small to em- 
ploy a system of home athletics. We 
readily admit that a majority are too 
small for athleticism but no school is 
too small for healthy athletics. As long 
as we view this question through the 
bigoted spectacles of athleticism, of 
course we would say home athletics 
are not practicable. But laying aside all 
bigotry and thus getting a proper per- 
sjiective of home athletics, we must 
conclude that this system puts it in 
its proper relation to the activities of 
college life. A system of athletics that 
calls into play the entire student body 
is a perfect system ; it is based on 
sound principle. This system would 
remove much of the physical danger 
and tension of athleticism, and would 
afford exercise in the way of legitimate 
sport for practically every student in 
the college. 

There is also a moral side to this 
question. The custom of ranking an 
institution according to its athletic re- 
cord is not based on a sound ethical 
principle. Many a young man has re- 
fused to attend a certain college be- 
cause it had a poor athletic record. If 
a man decides upon a college on this 
ground it betokens for him a narrow 
view of life and slim chances of honor 
in the path of service. Every school 
must finally stand on its merits, and if 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



its graduates are saturated with ath- 
leticism and possess a smattering of 
wisdom, they will soon be found sad- 
ly lacking when the acid test of life 
comes. This is an extreme case, but 
why should not the extreme be elimi- 
nated by the institution of a system 
l)ased upon ethical principles? 

Then, too, an institution often re- 
sorts to professional athletes, who are 
nominally enrolled, in order that they 
may legally represent the institution. 
This in not in keeping with good 
ethics, yet Christian education seem- 
ingly tolerates it for the sake of ex- 
tending the reputation of the school. 
It is often a false reputation secured 
by illegal means. This is a violation 
of principle and ought to be regarded 
as such by our educational institutions. 
The reason it is not condemned at the 
bar of common sense is because that 
peculiar sense of becoming less com- 
mon to so many people in America. 
This accounts for a number of evils 
we tolerate as a nation. 

There is another evil associated with 
this system of inter-collegiate athletic- 
ism. It is the undue popularity ac- 
corded to the hero of a contest. This 
often gives a young man a false notion 
of himself. No man is really great un- 
less he has principles of right actuating 
his deeds. Popularity and character 
are often antipodal. The student who 
is honest) and painstaking in his work 
deserves the acclamation of his col- 
leagues, but does he always get it? 
No; often the student who has done 
the least work in the class room, and 
may perhaps, be only nominally a stu- 
dent, is heralded forth by students and 
magazines in stentorian tones as the 
hero of the institution. And yet 



Christian Education sits by and hears 
the proclamation and says, "Amen '. 
Amen!" O the ethics of athleticism! 
Does this seem like boinbast in 
cynical and fanatical tones? Is it too 
latitudinarian? To us it is the truth 
and the "spot will not out." We have 
tried home athletics for fourteen years 
and are convinced that it is the proper 
relation of athletics to school life, and 
that it is conducive to the highest 
welfare of the student body, and that 
it is in accordance with the ethics of 
the Christian religion. We have ruled 
out football from our home athletics 
because it is too dangerous for a sport, 
and are glad that other colleges are 
also following in the wake. We be- 
lieve in "sport for sport's sake," no 
more, no less. May we all strive for 
athletics that will have for its aim, the 
greatest good to the greatest number ; 
that will give proportionate develop- 
ment to the individual ; and that will 
inculcate principles of right in the 
hearts of the students in our colleges. 

The W'tinter Term closes March 19, 
and the Spring Term opens March 23. 



Remember these four dates: 

April 10. at 3 p. m. Arbor Day Pro- 
gram by the Senior Class. 

.\pril 10, at 7.30 p. m. Anniversary 
of the Founding of the Literary So- 
cieties. 

April 17, at 8 p. m. Lecture on "A 
Grand .\rmy Man," by John F. 
Chambers. 

May 7, at 8 p. m. Music Program 
by the Musical Department of Eliza- 
bcthtown College. 




s 



^0 



N 











t 



L 



U 



Spring Term is almost here, we then 
expect to see many new faces on Col- 
lege Hill. 

On Friday evening, February 6 the 
Ladies' Glee Club sang at a musical 
given in Elizabethtown. 

Saturday evening, February 7 the 
music pupils gave a recital in Music 
Hall. The following program was 
rendered : 

Wayside Flowers, Ruth Reber 

Lilacs Elsie Stayer 

Welcome IrenC' Harlacher 

\\'ood Notes Amanda Nissley 

Alone Roberta Freymeyer 

The Chorister Bertha Perry 

As Pants the Hart, C. J. Rose 

When the Lights are Low, 

Elsie Stayer 

O Ye Tears Sara Olweiler 

\^'elcnme Sweet Spring Time, 

Lila Shimp 

Narcissus Laura Landis 

The Little Girl in the Machine, 

Miss Vera Care 

Lullaby of the Night,.. Bertha Perry 

What .^m I Love Without Thee? 

C. L. Martin 

Electric Flash, (Duet) Olweiler, Miller 

Notice: — I have a full line of the 



best art productions on the market. 
Will be especially glad to show you 
photographs. Terms reasonable. A. 
J. Replogle, Room 46, Memorial Hall. 

Professor Ober was in Elgin, Illi- 
nois, the first week in March attend- 
ing a meeting of the General Sunday 
School Board of the Church of the 
Brethren. 

On February eighteenth the faculty 
went for a sleigh ride. Upon their 
return they repaired to the kitchen 
where they were served with refresh- 
ments. Several toasts were given in 
honor of Dr. Reber, it being his birth- 
day. 

Mr. Wenger's favorite command : 
"Go and do thou like-wise." 

On Thursday evening, February 
twenty-sixth, the Young Men's Bible 
Class taught by Miss Myer rendered 
a program in Music Hall. The pro- 
gram was on the Life of Christ and 
proved to be very interesting and 
highly instructive. 

On the same evening a number of 
the students went to Florin, to the 
home of Mr. Geyer, on a sleighing 
party. 

We certainh' wish that everv read-. 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



er of "Our College Times" could have 
hoard the lecture given by Mrs. Ar- 
mor. We were told before she came 
that she was called "The Georgia 
Whirlwind ' and we beheve she has 
an appropriate title. Mrs. Armor was 
certainly filled with the message that 
she brought to us. Her subject was: 
"The Strangest Thing in the World." 
She presented the temperance question 
to us in a new light. 

The interest in basket ball is as 
keen as ever. Interesting games are 
played almost every evening. One of 
the most interesting, however, was the 
game between the Seniors and the 
Juniors with a score of 22 — 19 in favor 
of the Seniors. 

Seniors Juniors. 

T. Reber Guard J. Heisey 

H. Rover Guard I. Kreider 

O. Hershey Centre P. Engle 

F. Wise Forward H. Geyer 

TF Brandt Forward L Herr 

The --tudcnts listened to a most ex- 
cellent chapel talk on February 6, by 
Miss Kline. Her subject was "Har- 
mony." We believe that it helped 
many of the students to tune them- 
selves to the harmony of life around 
them. 

February twenty-dighth saw a 
splendid social in Music TTall. The 
social n'as well planned and was pro- 
nounced a trrand success by all. .\t 
the clo-^e refreshments were served. 

On Friday evcnincr, April 10, the 
■\nni\-ersar_\- of the Fmrnding of the 
Literary Societies will be held. The 
Keystone and the Homerian Societies 
will give a joint ])rogram. We urge 
cverv person \\lio lias been a member 
of eitlier of these societies to be pre- 
sent. I'.oth the Key>tone and the 



Homerian Societies have been doing 
splendid work this year. 

We enjoyed a good sermon by Bro. 
I. N. Widder of Harrisburg, in the 
College Chapel on Sunday morning. 
March first. 

On Sunday, March 7, F'rofcssor 
Schlosser was in Norristown and de- 
livered a temperance sermon. 

On April 17, 1914, John F. Cham- 
bers, the famous reader will appear for 
the first time on College Hill. His 
subject will be "A Grand Army Man." 
This is a sparkling drama with a dis- 
tinctive American atmosphere. It is 
constructed along the Imodern lines 
and deals witl» the problems of the 
home. We believe that Mr. Cham- 
bers will picture real life to us and we 
trust that you will come to hear him. 

A Sunday School teacher was quiz- 
zing her class of small boys on their 
desire for righteousness and said: ".MI 
those who would like to go to heaveit 
stand." 

Every member of the class stood but 
one. 

"Why Johnny," exclaimecl the 
teacher, "dont you want to go to 
heaven?" 

"Xaw," said the boy with a disgust- 
ed air, "not with that bunch." 

Dr. I'echt gave us some excellent 
advice. A\'e enjoyed his presence and 
took inspiration from the n<ible 
thoughts and ideals presented to us. 

The Roys' Glee Club sang at a 
temperance meeting in the U. B. 
Church. Mrs. Parsels of Philadelphia, 
gave a forceful lecture at the same 
program. 

< )n Wednesday evening March 4, 
the following program was rendered 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



on the Anniversary of the Dedication 
of the Buildings. 

Chorus Senior Vocal Class 

Invocation G. N. Falkenstein 

Address of Welcome R. W. Schlosser 
Recitation . . Naomi G. Longenecker. 

Chorus Boy's Chorus 

Oration Laban W. Leiter 

Girls' Chorus 

.■\ddress Dr. J. George Becht 

When the weather is wet we must not 

fret; 
When the weather is dry we must not 

cry; 
When the weather is cold we must not 

scold ; 
When the weather is warm we must 

not storm; 
But be happy together whatever the 

weather. 



Arbor Day Program 

The Senior class will render the 
following program on April lo at the 
College: 
Music 
Address by the President of the Class 

J. D. Reber 

Recitation Miss Lillian Becker 

Essay Miss Linda Huber 

Miisic i"! 

Oration Mr. John Kuhns 

Address Prof. H. K. Ober 

The Planting of the Tree. 
Music 

The Senior Class desires the pres- 
ence of their friends at this their first 
public program. 

High School Bo)- : "How near were 
you to the right answer of the third 
question?" 

Girl : "Oh, about three seats awav." 



K. L. S. Notes 

The program on February 20 open- 
ed with an inaugural address by the 
president, Harvey K. Geyer. His 
subject was "The P.ullet and the Bal- 
lot." His speech was very interesting. 
The society then sang "The Star 
Spangled Banner." An interesting es- 
say was given by Elizabeth R. Miller 
entitled "Twenty Years from To-day." 
It was a prophecy of what would be in 
store for many of the students and 
teachers. Robert Ziegler gave an in- 
structive account of "The Mississiopi 
Scheme." Elizabeth Engle recited "Co- 
lumbus." "Juanita" was then sung 
by the society. The most interesting 
debate of the term then followed. The 
nuestion. Resolved. That the Study of 
Literature is more Beneficial than 
that of Science, was debated affirma- 
tively bv Professor R. W. Schlosser; 
negatively, by Professoor J. G. Meyer. 
'Both speeches were snirited as both 
speakers were well acquainted with 
their subjects, .\fter an 'interesting 
debate, the society sang "The Old 
Oaken Bucket." The Literary Echo 
was then read by the editor, ^Martha 
Mathiot. 

On Februarv 27, the program was 
opened with a song entitled "My Bon- 
nie." Ruth Reber then gave an essay 
entitled ".\ Rainv Saturday." It was 
original and full of humor. Ella 
Hiestand recited a beautiful selection 
entitled 'A Bunch of Primroses." Edna 
\\' enger gave a select reading entitled 
".■\wfully Lovely Philosophy." The 
reading was humorous as the subject 
suggests. Bertha Perry then sang 
very beautifully, "The Lullaby of the 
Xight." .\. J. Rcplogle gave a decla- 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



mation, entitled "School Master and 
ConQueror." Then followed a Sympo- 
sium. Grace Meyer very intelligently 
spoke on the merits of "A Teaching 
Course." Irene Wise gave excellent 
reasons for the wisdom of a girl choos- 
ing a Commercial Course. Her sub- 
ject was, "A Commercial Course." 
Helen Oellig discussed the question in 
which we are all directly or indirectly 
interested. It was a course in Domes- 
tic Science. Carrie Dennis then play- 
ed an instrumental solo after which 
the Literary Echo was read by Martha 
Mathiot. 

Homerian Literary Society. 

At se^•e^a! of our private meetings 
short programs have been rendered 
lately. At one of these meetings Pro- 
fessor J. S. Harley gave an address on 
Churchill's recent book "The Inside 
of the Cup." The music schedule for 
this program was deferred. At a 
later meeting the rendering of the sev- 
eral features fell to the lot of one 
member. Nora L. Reber first played a 
piano solo and then read a lengthy 
discussion on "The Influence of the 
Kindergarten." The officers for an- 
other term were also elected. The 
new Speaker is I. Z. Hackman; Vice 
President, A. L. Reber; Secretary, 
Orpha Harshberger ; Critic, C. L. Mar- 
tin; Chaplain, Professor Myer; Moni- 



tor, Rhoda Miller; Chorister, Kath- 
erine Miller. We were glad to elect 
Carrie Dennis as an active member of 
our society. Miss Dennis will be much 
needed in this 'society to furnish 
music among our number, as capable 
musicians seem scarce. 

The last public program seemed so 
interesting that no one present regret- 
ted having been there. The features 
were short and not quite as philosophic 
as they have been sometimes in the 
past. The chaplain conducted the in- 
vocation. Nora Reber and Katherine 
Miller sang a duet entitled "Sunset." 
The reciter, Rhoda Miller, read a 
beautiful selection in an effective man- 
ner. The debate was argued by two 
ladies. It proved quite humorous. 
They had selected for their question, 
Resolved, That a four years Domestic 
Science course is better adapted to the 
needs of the average American girl 
than a four years classical course. The 
negative speaker, Lilian Falkenstein, 
won the decision of the judges. Her 
opponent was Nora Reber. In ad- 
dition the meeting was entertained by 
a female quartet, "Life's Dream." The 
address was delivered by C. L. Martin. 
His subject on "What is God?" was 
ably discussed. It showed much care- 
ful preparation. The last feature be- 
sides the Critic's report was a Piano 
Solo, "Last Hope," played by Eliza- 
beth Miller. 




Mr. L. D. Rose, 'ii. Windber, Pa., 
reports that he has had varied ex- 
periences since he left college, but that 
he is as young as ever. For almost a 
year he has been employed by the 
Berwind-White Coal Mining Company 
at Windber. He is taking special in- 
terest in this work and we hope that 
in years to come it may be reported 
through these columns that Mr. Rose 
has become one of the leading bitumin- 
ous coal' operators. 

Miss Florence Miller, 'lo, visited 
her sister at the College lately. Miss 
Miller is teaching a graded school in 
Ephrata, Pa. 

Miss Elizabeth Kline, '05, gave us a 
very instructive Chapel Talk on "Har- 
mony" as it should be applied to real 
every day living. She is also booming 
the music department of the school. 
The special music programs given oc- 
casionally and the special music at 
other public services are a treat. 

Mr. Edgar Diehm, '13, won a twen- 
ty-five dollar prize in an oratorical con- 
test at Juniata College. 

Miss Minerva Heisey, '10, who had 
been working for A. Buch's Sons 
Company, is now employed by Mr. 
Samuel Kiefer another of our alumni. 
Mr. Kiefer is a notary public and fire 
insurance agent in town. 



Miss Susan Miller, '07, for a long 
time stenographer with the Kreider 
Shoe Company, is now working at the 
Masonic Home near town. Miss 
Rhoda E. Markley, '11, is also em- 
ployed as a stenographer at this place. 

Miss Rebekah SheafTer, '13, attend- 
ed the lecture given by Mrs. Armor, 
in February, and visited some friends 
at the College. Miss SheafTer is 
teaching near her home in Bareville, 
Pa. 

Mr. L. W. Eeiter, '09, delivered a 
splendid oration , "A Call to Arms," in 
the College Chapel on the evening of 
the Anniversary of the Dedication of 
the College. 

Messrs. Myers, '11, and Eby, '11, 
will complete the College Course at 
Ursinus College this year. 

The Alumni Association rejoices 
that another noble-hearted alumna has 
offered herself to go to India as a 
trained nurse. This consecrated work- 
er, Bessie M. Rider of Elizabethtown, 
will be supported on the field by the 
Elizabethtown Church. Sister Rider 
will be our seventh representative on 
the foreign field. 

Twelve of our graduates are now in 
the ministry. Thirty-four ministers 
have thus far attended our school. 




The stormy March has come at last, 
With winds and clouds and chang- 
ing skies; 

I hear the rushing of the blast, 

That thrnugh the snow}- valley flies. 

We gratefully acknowledge the 
large numl:)cr of February exchanges. 
Come again. 

The Red and Blaclk, Boy's High 
School. Reading, Pa. In looking 
through your High School News we 
find the pa]>er attractive, well arrang- 
ed, and versatile. Especially does 
your literary department deserve 
credit. 

Read "Glimpses of Browning's Phil- 
osophy as Revealed in Two of his 
Poems," as found in the Juniata Echo. 
It will surely give you new glimpses 
of hope and of joy, and at the same 
time aid you to become more optimis- 
tic. The Echo portrays the college 
proceedings very nicelj'-. 

The Signal, New Jersey State 
Schools, Trenton, N. J. Your poems 
are 'interesting". The prizic-winntng 
story, ''When Peggy Played Forward," 
is \ ery original. Your Composition 



work in the grades is splendid. The 
School Calendar on the inside of one 
cover and the events of the town on 
the inside of the other cover is some- 
thing just a little different from what 
other papers have ; it adds to the in- 
terest of your paper. A more exten- 
sive exchange department might add 
still more. 

The cuts of "The Clipper" Du Bois 
High School, are suitable and sugges- 
tive. You have one of the most ex- 
tensive exchange departments. In 
reading your exchanges as well as 
some other parts of the paper one al- 
most needs a pilot. Your 1915 Class 
Poem is very appropriate. 

"The Spice," Norristown High 
School. The cover, as well as the 
contents of the Spice, is saturated very 
fittingly with the spirit of farewell. 

How Others See Us. 

The Spice. Norristown High School. 
Your essays in this month's issue are 
very well written. 

The Mirror writes: Best arranged 
paper. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



25 



The Optimist: Our College Times 
has a very good literary department. 
It is evident that the students of the 
school represented by this magazine 
realize that the college paper can be 
only what the students make it. 

The Bulletin: A little more vim 
would improve "Our College Times," 
and some good cuts. 

The Old School Red and Black: Our 
College Times, Elizabethtown College, 
is our first honor exchange. "The 
Life of a Newsboy" is a well develop- 
ed story. We are anxiously awaiting 
your next issue. 

High School Impressions, Scranton : 
The well written themes in contrast 
with the light literature of some of the 
school publications are distinctive 
features of Our College Times, and as 
such are a welcome exchange. 

The Amulet, West Chester State 
Normal School: Our College Times. 



Don't forget that first impressions are 
received from the things first seen. 
A good plain cover would improve 
your otherwise good magazine. 

The joint committee of the two 
Literary Societies is making an effort 
to produce an excellent program for 
the Anniversary of the Founding of 
these Societies. We desire to call spe- 
cial attention to the persons who are 
members of these societies and earn- 
estly request their presence. We are 
sure that nothing would attest your 
loyalty to your society, and to your 
Alma Mater, so much as your presence 
at these exercises. It would give en- 
couragement to those who are now 
members of these societies, and would 
be an evidence of your loyalty to 
the institution. We hope that a num- 
ber of our loyal students and friends 
will make some sacrifice and arrange 
to be present this vear. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



e BEE HIVE STORE 



For 

DRY GOODS 

and 
NOTIONS 

RAIN COATS 

and 
UMBRELLAS 

Shoes, Etc 
"Something New Every Day, 




CONDUCTED ON SANITAF.V PRIN- 
CIPLES IS THE 

RALPH CROSS 

Shaving Parlor 



Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. 
None Better. Few as Good. 

D. H. BECK 

South Market St., El ZABETHTOWN 

The baker who knows how. Phone or drop 

a postal. 

BISHOP'S STyOJO 

PHOTOS OF ALL STYLES 

FRAMING NEATLY EXECUTED 
Kodaks and Films for sale. Amateur 
Finishing Solicited. Work Guaranteed. 

Centre Square. 



LEO KOB 

: Heating and 

Plumbing 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

? 



SWEATERS 
UNDERWEAR 
HOSIERY 
NECKWEAR 

and 
FANCY 

GOODS 

A. A. ABELE, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



The Pratt 
Teachers' Agency 

70 Fifth Avenue 
New York 

Receives calls at all seasons for col- 
lege and normal graduates, specialists 
and other teachers in colleges, public 
and private schools in all parts of the 
country. 

Advises parents about schools. 

WM. O. PRaVt, Manager. 



Plain Suits Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats 

GANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange Sts. 
LANCASTER, PA. 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Athletic 



Kodaks an<: o^- , ^'s of all kinds al- 
ways on ha.J 1 1 the famous Elastman 
duality. Don't forget us when In need 
of supplies for in or out door sports. 

HARRY K. DORSHEIMER 

Exclusive agency for Hopewell Choc- 
olate D;iint|ps. 



School Supplies. 



Cutlery 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



27 



iG.Win.REISNER 

i Manufacturing 

I Jeiveler 

= College Jewelry of the Better Sort. 

m Class Pins and Rings, Prize Cups, Fra- 

I ternity Jewelry, Medals. 

B Watches Diamonds Jewelry 

I 120 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 

lllillllinilllBllinilllBIIIIIHIIIIBIIIIBIIIIIIIIIiailllHIIIIIBIIIIBillllBIIII 



CENTRAL 
MEAT MARKET 

All Kinds of Choice 

Fresh and Smoked Meats. 

H. H. GOOD, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

WiE DO IT RIGHT 

Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES & SON 




MUTH BROS 



LUM ^ERo 



A)so a!l kill 


1 uildlng material 


and mill wrrk 


1 t and Cement, 


Wieeler S r 


fertilizer, Patent 


Plaster aii'i 


' ster Board,etc. 


COAU, 


, FEED, ETC. 


M'e ai 


'P. dfial 


that v.i 


-nd- 


ship. 





Franklin and Marshall 
College, Lancaster, Pa. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Offers liberal courses in 

ARTS and SCIENCES. 

Campus of fifty-four acres with ten 
buildings including Gymnasium and 
complete Athletic Field. 

For catalogue apply to 
HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. CARMAN 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 
Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 

F. D. CROFF &. BRO. 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



<Larry 
This Pen 
Upside Down 



— if you want to. Yes. in any posi- 
tion, any pocket. 

Boys: carry the Parker Jack Knife 
Pen in. your troxisers pocket along 

Girls: carry it in the pocket of 
ycur white blouse. 

Fiay tootbaU with it. -basketball, 
t;nnis, hockey. It's on the job the 
minute you want to wr te, without 
leaving a pinhead spot of ink any- 
where it has been carried 

Write? Just im gine a pen of 
e'ass that melts to ink as you slide it 
across paijerl That's the way it wntcs. 

Price $2.50 up. Gel one on trial 
Takeit back any i.ne within 10 
'.lys if you're not tickled to dea \ 
w'lh it. We auiSonze d alcr to rc- 
^'A, If your dealer doesn't carry 
. 'arkers, write us for catalog toduy. 



>ARKER 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

Seven Reasons : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 

Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing:, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre Square, 

JACOB HSHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
With you for 35 years. THAT'S ALL 



I Lehman & Wolgemuth 
COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR 
Telephone 

;; ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENN'A 
' »4i4i» » »» » ». H i. H .. H H .. | i. l . < . 1 . 1 . | i 1 | i. |M >. H - 



FURNITURE 

F. C. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - - PENN'A 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



: W. R. Ashenfelter 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at Short Notice. 



S. Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA 
» ♦♦ ♦♦* * l " >*I H"H" >' l"l"H ' l"l" l "l ''l " >' l"l"l ' 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING. 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

URSINUS COLLEGE, Collegevllle, Pa. 

(24 miles from Philadelphia) 
Group system of instruction. University 
trained faculty. High standards of scholar- 
ship. Athletics encouraged but controlled. 
No fraternites or exclusive clubs. Strong 
Christian influences. New dormitories and 
dining halls. Men and women admitted to 
all courses. 

SUMMER SESSION 
Oldest and most inviting college summer 
school in Pennsylvania. College courses 
and preparatory studies. Teaching by heads 
of departments. Large shaded campus and 
cool buildings. Terms low. 
GEORGE LESLIE OMWAKE, Pd.D., Pres. 

ELIZABETHTOWN DENTAL PARLORS 

Office Closed Thursday 

and Friday. 

S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 



We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 

Y. M. C. A. BIdg., LANCASTER, PA. 

«iiaiaiii!iB!!i:iaiiiiiai:iifli::::iB«iB;:iiai!::;Biiin!ii!:a!i::n!'iia;ii::B:: 

Ih. H. BRANDT' 



= ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
I SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of ifour Patronage. 



We ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD 

$1.00 A YEAR 
Estimates on any kind of Job Printing. 



Linotyping for the Trade. 



J. N. OLWEILER:: 



CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. ', 
every Wednesday. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



DENTIST 

GEO. rt. KERSEY 

Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



The place to buy 
Stationery, Pennants, Souvenir Goods, Post 
Cards, and hundreds of articles for your 
pleasure and convenience. Our candies are 
always fresh. LAWRY'S VARIETY STORE, 
Half Block S. of Center Sq., Elizabethtown. 

Bogfgs Hardware Store 

The best there is in hardware at the 
lowest possible prices. Prompt and cour* 
teous service. TRY US. 



D. B. KLINE 

CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



A. W. CAIN 

store Adjoining Federal Room . 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - - PENN'A 



JOHN A. FISHER 

BARBER 

Centre Square, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



CEO. A. FISHER 

Hardware 

Phonographs 

And 

Records 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



iHiiBii»Biiii;ai":iBKniBi!i!iBiiiaiiiiiaii!i!Biiniiiiifliii«'''iBiiiiif 

j JOS. H. RIDER & SON ! 

m AGENCY FOR * 

I g 

i SPALDING'S i 

I § 

I Baseballi Tennis Goods I 



♦♦<♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*-«. 

I ELIZA}'. ■•' 

\ ROLLKR MIIJ.S 

♦ J. F. Bl .1 A ■' --o .• 

J ■ Manufactiii 

\ TIMVW. 

X Hi(ft<estr.- 



Mention Our QjUege Times When Writing. 



iiiaiiiiininiBiiHiBiiiiBiiiiaiiiiiviiiiBiiii 



I I The Book Store i 

I I 

I BOOKS, BIBLES, SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPPLIES | 

I MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED I 

I G. N. FALKEE^STEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. | 



iiiai!iiini;iiaii'iiiiiiiiiii'iiiB:'iiBiiiiHiiiijniiii 



iiiBi»iiBiiiiB;iiiiB»iiiBiiiiiBiiiiiv:iniiiiBiiiiniinii:;:aiii;!Bii] 




Seven thousand people buy WALK- 
OVER shoes every day— certainly 
there must be much merit In a shoe 
to attain such popularity — 
In addition to the better quality ot 
our shoes we offer our better man- 
ner of serving you. 

WALK-OVER 

SHOE STORE 

HUNTZBERGER-WINTERS CO. 

Department Store 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'A 

♦♦'l^^^^ ^ ♦♦♦♦<^^ ^ ^ l" ^* ♦ 'l "^ ' ^ ♦♦^^^^l M l ^ ^ 



MIESSE'S ICE CREAM 

adds ZEST to the MEAL 

Sold in Elizabethtown by 

J. S. GROSS. 



IPaintinG anb IPaper 
Ibanging 

AMOS B. DRACE 

Spalding Sporting Goods 

Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 
Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic 
Shoes. Kodaks and Cameras, de- 
veloping and finishing. 

H . B . H £ R R 
30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



884 Est. 1884 

KIRK JOHNSON (^ CO. 

Pianos, Player-Pianos, Victrolas, Sheet Music, Musical Mdse. 
6-18 W. King Street, LANCASTER, PA. 




Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Elizabethtown Exchange 



Transacts a gene ' banking business. 

Pays interest i. le deposits. 

Solicits your patronage. 

OFFICERS 



A. G. HEISEY, President. 



ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice. Pres. 



J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



DIRECTORS 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
H. J. Gish 



Jos. G. Heisey 
Dr. H. K. Blough 
Henry E. Laudls 
E. E. Hernley 



J. H. Buch 
Dr. A. M. Kalbach 
Geo. D. Boggs 
B. H. Greider 



TAKE YOUR 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morn- 
ing. Returns Wednesday & Friday afternoon 

Ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 




O. N. HEISEY 



i Provisions, Groceries and Choice Candies | 



1 HEISEY BUILDING 



(TOWN, PA. 



i 



O^^f/VT. 



The Coming of Caroline 5 

The Responsibilities of Women 

The Signboards Along Life's Highway 11 

The Danger of Superficial Learning. 13 

Patriotism 14 

EDITORIAL 

Riding Classic Ponies IB 

SCHOOL NOTES 20 

K. L. S. Notes 22 

Homerian News 23 

Society Anniversary 23 

Alumni Notes 24 

Exchanges 25 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 




Black Cat 
Hosiery 



HERTZLER'S 
Department Store 

Your needs supplied at satisfactory 
prices in Dry Goods, Groceries, Ready- 
to-Wear Clotliing for Men and Women 
of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Flo:r Oil- 
cloth, Shoes, etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 

CLOTHING 

International Tailoring Co., N. Y. 

American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chi- 
cago. 
Up-to-Date Samples on Hand. 

HERTZLER BROS. & CO. 

Cemtre Square EliZabethtOWIl, PS. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits, $164,000 



General Accounts Solicited. Interest Paid on Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent. 



DIRECTORS 



W. S. Smith 


Elmer W. Strlckler 


Peter N. Rutt 


F. W. Grofl. 


J. S. Risser 


B. L. Geyer 


E. C. Ginder 


Amos G. Coble 


E. B. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 




Distinctive Styles 

In 

Coats, Suits, Dresses, 
and Waists 



Whether it is a Coat, Dress or 
Waist, you are sure to find our sty'cs 
distinctive, we mean authorative 
styles that duplicate the mode with- 
out going to the extreme, for they 
are always in good taste. 

Coats and Suits 

In Misses Suits and Coats, Spring 
heralds her coming with many charm- 
ing conceptions here, each of which 
asserts style correctness in no un- 
certain way, there is a "touch and go" 
a "smartness" — about the lines and 
new ideas that aro most effective and 
becoming. 

Dresses at tlie Style Store 

Cool, fresh, danty Dresses with a 
stylish dash of color that gives a 
pretty finish to neck, waist and bor- 
der, distinguished, charming models 
in Silks, Lingerie Dresses now invite 
critical inspection, YOUR inspection, 
young lady. 

Waists 

Waists that will relieve the ever- 
lasting monotony and sameness, dis- 
tinctvie, new models in smart effects 
that will become a surprisingly large 
nmber of girls who seek exclusive- 
ness of styles. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



D. H. MARTIN 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre Square, 

JACOB nSHER 
Watctimaker & Jeiveler 

Centie Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
With you for 35 years. THAT'S ALL 

Lehman & Wolgemuth 
COAL 



WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR 
Telephone 



t ELIZAB 



ETHTOWN, 
*4 



FURNITURE 

F. C. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - - PENN'A 



Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 



♦ ♦ ♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦* 

: W. R. Ashenfelter 

CHOICE BREAD AND 

CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied witli 
Fancy Cakes at Short Notice. 

S. Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING. 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

URSINUS COLLEGE, Collegevllle, Pa. 

(24 miles from Philadelphia) 
Group system of instruction. University 
trained faculty. High standards of scholar- 
ship. Athletics encouraged but controlled. 
No fraternites or exclusive clubs. Strong 
Christian influences. New dormitories and 
dining halls. Men and women admitted to 
all courses. 

SUMMER SESSION 
Oldest and most inviting college summer 
school in Pennsylvania. College courses 
and preparatory studies. Teaching by heads 
of departments. Large shaded campus and 
cool buildings. Terms low. 
GEORGE LESLIE OMWAKE, Pd.D., Pres. 

ELIZABETHTOWN DENTAL PARLORS 

Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday. 
S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 
We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 

Y. M. C. A. BIdg., LANCASTER, PA. 



IH. H. BRANDT 



I ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
1 SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



I ELIZABETHTOWN, PENN'A 

m 
m 



(§nt (Haik^ Exmis 



Elizabbthtown, Pa., Ai-kil, 1914 



The Coming of Caroline 

Linda B. Huber 



I 



"There's no use talking about it; I 
won't have that girl in my house." 

"But, Rachael. we can't let her go 
to the poorhouse. What do you sup- 
pose the people would say about us, 
we being the only kith and kin the 
child nas?" 

"That makes no difference to me, 
even if we are the only relatives she 
has, nor does it make a bit of difference 
to me what the people say about us. 
I am sure they can't say we ever 
cheated other people out of their rights 
or bribed a lawyer to destroy a will." 

"Come, Rachel, be reasonable. Mich- 
ael is dead now and it won't make 
matters any better to bring up all of 
that old fuss again. Besides, Caroline 
can't help what her father did. He 
was my brother and since he is gone 
I am sorry that I didn't make restitu- 
tion to him and treat him a little more 
ci\"iriy while he lived." 

"Well, I'm not sorry, for I never 
liked either him nor his high-toned 
wife, and why should I have this girl 
here? She will be just like her moth- 
er. No, I won't have her come here 
and turn up her nose at everything we 
have." 

"Yon women are all alike,— ready to 
judge before you have seen and to take 
your spite out on anything that hap- 



pens to be near. I have this much to 
say, Rachel Norton, that in this matter 
I am going to do what I think is right, 
Caroline Norton shall come here and 
make her home with us and I entreat 
you beforehand, Rachel, not to make 
her life more unhappy than it is." 

"Very well, have your own way, but 
if you think I am going to carry her 
around and wait on her, you are much 
mistaken. I hate her already, she's 
nothing but the daughter of a pauper 
and I would rather welcome the most 
slovenly ragamuffin into this house 
than to have that girl." 

"That will do. Say no more ; for, 
pauper or not, he was my brother and 
it's not the child's fault. Her mother 
was a Christian lady, a thing which is 
more to her credit than to many child- 
ren." 

With this last thrust Mr. Norton 
left the kitchen and went to the barn 
to feed the stock, while his wife con- 
tinued her work of washing the break- 
fast dishes. She was in no pleasant 
frame of mind this morning and it hurt 
her to the very heart to have incurred 
her husband's displeasure, but it was 
not her fault she told herself. He was 
unreasonable and could not know what 
it would mean to have this young girl 
come and make her home there. They 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



had no children of their own and Mrs. 
Norton, who was accustomed to hav- 
ing her own way in everything and 
who had no patience with children, 
was now most unwilling to have put 
upon her the care of her husband's 
brother's child, Caroline Norton. 

Years ago there had been a dispute 
between the two brothers over the will 
of their father's estate. Angry words 
had been spoken, and a false accusa- 
tion had been brought against Michael. 
They had parted with bitterness in 
their hearts and they had not spoken 
to each other since the birth of Caro- 
line, which was thirteen years ago, 
Cyrus had long before forgiven his 
brother and would have taken steps to 
have peace eflfected between them but 
his wife, Rachel, would not hear to it. 
She hated Michael with intensity and 
now her husband had declared his in- 
tentions of having the daughter of the 
despised come and live with them. 

Since the death of her father, Caro- 
line was left alone in the world with- 
out money and without a home. She 
had been taken to "The Home for 
Friendless Children," in the city where 
she lived. The Superintendent of this 
home had written to Cyrus Norton 
and had asked him to give Caroline a 
home, stating that the child was heart- 
broken over the loss of her father and 
was so pitifully lonely that it would be 
a deed of love and mercy to help her. 
The morning the letter arrived Mr. 
Norton informed his domineering wife 
of the contents of the letter and that 
he felt it was his duty to give Caroline 
a home. Thus we found his wife with 
a frown upon her forehead and an 
angry light in her steel-grey eyes. 
The day passed and nothing more 



was said by either on the subject but 
the next day, however, there might 
have been a scuffle had not a neighbor 
called just as Mr. Norton informed his 
wife that he had received a telegram 
stating that Caroline would be there 
the next evening. 

The next evening came and with it 
came Caroline. Her uncle had driven 
to the little village station to meet her 
and he was quite pleased with her. 
He watched his wife askance as he in- 
troduced Caroline and added, 

"This is your Aunt Rachel, Lina, 
and I hope you will love her very 
much." 

Somehow Mrs. Norton could not 
help but smile and kiss Caroline, a 
thing which she had vowed she would 
not do. Then, too, she was pleased 
with the simple dress and neatly braid- 
ed hair, which was tied with a bow of 
wide black ribbon. She noted the thin 
cheeks and the purple shadows be- 
neath the lovely grey eyes for which 
the dark fringes of black eyelashes 
were not altogether accountable. There 
was a quiet air of refinement about her 
that put to shame, for awhile, all of 
Mrs. Norton's intentions of coldness. 
Days and weeks flew swiftly by, and 
Caroline felt her aunt's dislike more 
and more, but she was patient and 
kind and when her aunt would reprove 
her, scold her, and find fault with her, 
she would simply say, "I am very 
sorry dear aunt Rachel, I will try to 
do better.'" 

Of her parents, especially of her 
father, she seldom spoke, because her 
aunt had hinted to her that she dis- 
liked them and wanted never to hear 
their names mentioned. 

When alone in her room, Caroline 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



would throw herself across the bed and 
sob because of her loneliness, and often 
she cried herself to sleep and then 
dreamed that she was again a happy 
child and that she still had her father 
and her mother. 

After Caroline had been in the home 
nearly a year a sudden change took 
place in the Norton home. Caroline 
went down-stairs early one morning, 
as was her usual custom and found, to 
her amazement. Uncle Cyrus trying to 
prepare his own breakfast. 

"Why, where is Aunt Rachel?" she 
asked. 

"She is sick, Lina, and I am going 
to town for a doctor," was her uncle's 
reply. 

The doctor came and, after making 
a careful diagnosis of the case, pro- 
nounced it typhoid fever. 

"She must have the best of care," he 
said, "and the best medical attention as 
it appears to be a severe case." 

Mr. Norton tried in vain to secure 
the service of a nurse to take charge of 
the house, and the best he could do 
was to get a woman who was willing 
to come for four days every week. 
Consequently upon Caroline's young- 
shoulders fell the burden of overseeing 
the housework and of caring for her 
aunt. For six long, hard weeks the 
fever raged, but the young nurse was 
patient and faithful, leaving nothing 
undone that would make the suffering 
one more comfortable ; she watched 
each change for the better or for the 
worse and in the still hours of the 



night she knelt by her bedside and 
pleaded with the God her mother 
taught her to love, that he might spare 
Aunt I^iachel's life and help her to be 
strong that she might do more for her 
comfort. 

Then there came a day when the 
fever left and Mrs. Norton, looking 
very pale and weak, was able to sit up 
in bed and take without assistance, the 
dainty little lunch that Caroline had 
prepared for her. 

One morning while Caroline was ar- 
ranging the pillows, her aunt sudden- 
ly, but gently, took hold of the faithful 
hands of her little nurse and with a 
trembling voice, said, 

"O dear Caroline, how shall I ask 
you to forgive me? I have been so 
harsh and unkind to you, hating you, 
hating your father and your mother, 
and now 3T)U have been so kind to me ; 
you have heaped coals of fire upon my 
head and taught me to love you. Can 
you forgive and love me Caroline?" 

But Caroline's heart was too full for 
words ; she could not believe nor rea- 
lize that at last she was to have a home 
and a place in her aunt's heart. It 
was with gla'd tears streaming down 
her face that she threw her arms 
around her aunt's neck and kissed her. 
Then and there their hearts were uni- 
ted in a perfect bond of love and sympa- 
thy and Caroline, the friendless, un- 
loved orphan, became the joy and the 
sunshine in that home, and Mr. Norton 
often says that his wife is a different 
person since the coming of Caroline. 



The Responsibilities of Women 

Anna H. Brubaker 



In the last ten or twenty years wo- 
men have been demanding new privi- 
leges, and it naturally follows that 
they must assume new responsibilities. 
During the past year vital changes 
have taken place in the lives of women. 
In the colonial period women worked 
about as hard as men, if not harder. 
But to-day when many machines are 
used which take the work out of the 
hands of women in the home, they will 
sit idly by and do practically nothing 
while their fathers or husbands are 
working hard. This is especially true 
of the wealthy families. 

In many of these families the woman 
works scarcely five hours a day which, 
for the man, would be considered half 
a day. Should not the women whether 
in the home, or out of it, work eight or 
ten hours a day, the same as man? 
Certainly, it should be the same to-day 
as it was in the days of John Smith. 
His motto was that all people who 
worked should eat and those who did 
not work should not eat. Surely our 
people to-day should not hesitate to 
work for the food they eat. 

Many wealthy people of to-day 
though dressed in costly apparel, do 
not help to earn their living, and are 
in nowise better than the street beg- 
gar to whom we say, when he enters 
the yard, "You may go and earn your 
living. You are well and able to work." 
The beggar is too lazy to work for his 
food, so are the wealthy persons. They 
depend on their servants. The wealthy 



people do not stop to think that they 
are not earning their food like many 
hard-working people. 

Many of the high school girls of to- 
day are at home doing nothing. If a boy 
were to stop school with the intention 
of staying at home doing nothing, the 
girls would soon think it a downright 
shame. "Women should work at least 
eight hours a day. They should not 
allow all the work to be done by man. 
Woman, as well as man should, and 
must work for the progress of civiliz- 
ation. 

How much better would it be for 
the town, city, or community in which 
a woman lives if she would work. No 
exercise at all causes her to become in- 
active, helpless, and idle. Just as 
necessary as it is for a muscle to have 
exercise, so necessary is it for woman 
to work. Therefore, if women do not 
use their minds and bodies they be- 
come impaired. 

It is also the wealthy woman who 
wears the extremely indecent hat and 
costume, and who walks idly by, lead- 
ing a dog by a chain. It is the woman 
who sits on the veranda and constant- 
ly reads, that is lessening her good 
qualities. The woman who works is 
not always dressed in the costliest ap- 
parel because she realizes the value of 
money, nor are her thoughts entirely 
upon dress, but also on many other 
ideas. She is a better citizen if she 
works. She realizes by experience the 
value of money and is much less likely 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



to spend it foolishly. She will have the 
satisfaction in being independent if she 
earns her own money. She will re- 
joice in the fact that she has done her 
share in the work of the world. 

Woman, as I have said before, will 
become more sympathetic with the 
community in which she lives if she 
works. She will not be seen daily at 
the bargain counters buying cheap 
articles. She will invest her money in 
good material. 

There is enough work in this world 
to-day to keep woman l:)usy. As long 
as there are ignorant children to edu- 
cate ; as long as there are poor child- 
ren to be taken care of, so long will 
there be plenty of work to do, because 
the world is willing to pay for good 
workers. 

Again, it has often been said that to 
women belong the work of the home 
and the attention of her children. True 
it is, and, after her children are old 
enough to go to school, a great respon- 
sibility is taken from the mother and 



given into the hands of the teacher. 
While the children are at school, does 
the mother have any work to do if she 
has a servant to do the regular house- 
work? She certainly has not. Should 
not woman work eight hours a day? I 
say woman should work eight hours at 
least. 

Since this work is so unequally di 
vided between man and woman, it is 
the woman's duty to lessen the burden 
placed upon man's shoulders. She 
should not be satisfied to see others 
labor so hard for her. She should not 
allow herself to become indolent. She 
should be as willing to take responsi- 
bilities as she is to demand equal 
rights. Therefore, it should be the 
greatest desire of parents to see fhat 
their daughters are given some definite 
work in the world. After women 
have taken this position in the world, 
they will be an honor to themselves, 
do the work of the world more effi- 
ciently, and become more worthy com- 
panions of men. 



Keeping in Touch 

J. F. Graybill, '07, Malmo, Sweden. 



In this busy, strenuous time we 
scarcely stop long enough to consider 
the greatness of our advantages over 
those of our forefathers. Were we to 
go back and live in their time, we 
would have quite a task on our hands 
to adjust ourselves to conditions and 
surroundings. There is much cause 
for gratitude to our Creator for the 
century in which we are living. 



Sometime ago I read an account in 
our daily paper that impressed the 
thought heading this article, "Keeping 
in Touch." It was no new thought, 
but on this occasion I was especially 
impressed. Our paper of March 3, 
announced that the eastern part of the 
United States was visited by a severe 
snow storm on the evening of March i. 
The news was in Sweden almost as 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



soon as in the southern and western 
parts of the states. It is by twentieth 
century methods that we can keep in 
touch with the four quarters of the 
earth. Distance and time have been 
wonderfully minimized. But the touch 
is not so keen and perfect as if one 
were on the spot. We, in Sweden, 
ha\ inic: mild and beautiful weather, can 
hardly realize the condition in New 
York and Pennsylvania several weeks 
dr;o. We must be content for the 
present with reading the history of the 
Mexican Revolution and the political 
struggles of the United States in a fe-A- 
lines, — simply a "slight touch." 

People on the other side of the At- 
lantic can hardly by the few lines in 
the papers grasp the political situation 
in Sweden at present. Sweden bids 
fair to play an important role in his- 
tory in the not far distant future. The 
burning question is oppression on ac- 
count of high taxes caused by support 
to the State Church, the standing army 
and navy, and the high expense of the 
Royal Court. The party on the King's 
side, which I understand is the min- 
ority of the representatives, wants to 
increase this oppression. The fight 
has been hot for some time and has 
finally resulted in the resignation of 
the Cabinet. A new conservative 
Cabinet has been selected, but the 
Liberals want to fight it to a finish. 

It is hard to predict what will be 
the result. Conditions were quite 
threatening a few weeks ago. Some 
people were much alarmed over the 
situat'iii. It is mure quiet nmv, but I 



understand that both parties are work- 
ing silently and mustering their forces 
for a struggle in the future. "May the 
Republic live!" is the slogan of the 
Liberals. To bring this about, would 
doubtlessly mean a resort to arms and 
the shedding of blood. We pray that 
this may not be the curse of this coun- 
try. This would be a condition one 
would rather not be in touch with. Be 
it far from this here, as well as in other 
countries. 

While the above named conditions 
are such with which one would rather 
not be in touch, we are glad for Our 
College Times, a medium by which 
we can keep in touch with our 
Alma I\Iater. It aiifords us great 
pleasure to read the productions 
of the pens of those we know, 
as well as of those who are 
strangers to us. The essays are not 
only good literary works, but contain 
good moral instruction and prove what 
Elizabethtown College is doing for 
those who give the school a chance. 
Keep on in the good work. "Keep in 
touch" with the Divine Teacher and 
you will be able to touch the souls of 
the rising generation. "Keeping in 
touch" with God will give grace and 
power to influence the lives of others 
and mould characters that can not be 
produced in any other way. I praise 
the Lord for the privilege of having 
been in touch with Elizabethtown 
College a short time, for what it has 
done for me and others and for what 
it is doing now and what it will do in 
the future. 



The Signboards Along Life's Highway 



Ellla S. Hiestand 



The sigTi-board may seem an insig- 
nificant thing to some people. Only 
those who have traveled new roads, 
only those who have traveled unfamil- 
iar districts fully appreciate them. 
These sign-boards are inexpensive and 
yet often prove very valuable. They 
are merely small boards fastened to 
poles and placed at cross-roads, at 
forkings of a road, and at corners 
where roads lead from the main road. 
On them is painted the name of the 
town and also the distance to the town 
to which the road leads. 

Some time ago as I listened to an 
address, I heard many interesting and 
instructive things. Of all the noble 
things the speaker said, one phrase es- 
pecially impressed me and caused me 
to think. It was the phrase "Sign- 
t)oards along Life's Highway." As I 
meditated I thought of the great mis- 
sion of the sign-board, the necessity of 
being able to read the sign-board, and 
then the responsibility of choosing 
which sign-board to follow. 

The journey of life is very much 
like a country road. It winds around 
from right to left. It leads over hill 
and plain, through mountain and val- 
ley, and across land and stream. These 
roads have many roads leading from 
them, so it is only by these sign-boards 
that a stranger can be able to find his 
destination. Now, since there are no 
two individuals that have the same 
path through life, how does each one 
find his way? These pathways differ 
greatly and each individual has a path- 



way of his own. Some are almost level 
with no hindrances and seemingly as 
pleasant as might be desired. Some 
are level but rough. Some are rather 
delightful but full of steep places. 
Some are very stony and ruggi.d. Some 
have even been so unfortunate as to 
have wandered on paths that have 
caused them to faint by the wayside. 
Why such difficult pathways? Why 
such hardships? Why such misfor- 
tunes on life's highway? Is it because 
some prefer hardships? Is it because 
of misleading sign-boards? Or is it 
because the sign-boards are not heed- 
ed? Since these many conditions do 
exist I think every one will admit that 
sign-boards are needed to point out 
the nearest way, the best way, and to 
point out the dangers of the way lead- 
ing to the place the traveler is seeking. 
Without them many travelers would 
be obliged to wander to and fro only 
to grow weary, to become discouraged, 
and probably faint by the wayside be 
fore reaching any destination. These 
sign-boards on life's highway are just 
as real, they are just as true, and just, 
as numerous as those on the country 
highway. Yet with the best and the 
most accurate sign-boards there are 
still those who will become lost and 
wander into wayward paths. 

These wayward and forlorn condi- 
tions are caused by the carelessness, 
by the thoughtlessness, or by the in- 
ability of the traveler to read the sign- 
board he meets. For instance a man 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



starting on his journey toward success, 
but without heeding any of the sign- 
boards, may be very much dissapoint^ 
ed in finding his destination to be fail- 
ure. 

Then there are those who carelessly 
wander past these sign-boards with- 
out heeding them ; and only to their 
sorrow, they find they are going 
astray. They are obliged to retrace 
their steps or change their ideal. Few 
retrace their steps, hut many lower 
their ideals, all because of indifference 
to the sign-boards. 

.Then, again, there are those who are 
not able to interpret the different sign- 
boards. This proposition is probably 
confronting most of us. Do we always 
interpret them aright? Do we always 
reach the destination we are striving 
for? Tfave we journeyed along the 
path where we expect to find pleas- 
ure and later found sorrow instead? 
How often have we retraced our steps 
because of misinterpretation? How 
many steps might have been saved, 
how many cares avoided, how many 
trials omitted from our path, if we had 
only been able to read the sign-boards 
along life's highway ? 

Surely it is very important to be 
able to interpret the sign-boards, but 
the most important fact is the choice 
of the one to be followed. It is impos- 
sible to follow them all. Upon the 
choice of the sign-hoard you might 
wish to follow rests your destination. 



Hence this is very important. Many 
different ones are met daily, and daily 
the choice must be made between the 
lesser and the greater good. When 
you reach a cross-road of one rough 
road leading to honesty and the other 
an easy and beautiful one leading to 
wealth, which one will you choose? 
Another crossing is met. On the right 
are many steep hills and the road 
across these hills leads to service, 
while the one on the left leads through 
a valley of flowers to the land of 
pleasure. How few are willing to 
climb the steeps and be a blessing to 
the world! 

As we move along the pathway of 
life we may find many roads leading 
from the main one. A very prominent 
cross-road which causes the traveler 
considerable effort in deciding is the 
crossing of love and duty. The one 
leads to a happy home with one who 
is willing to share all the joys and 
sorrows of life with you. The road of 
duty may be a long and lonely journey 
with aged parents who require your 
constant care. Which shall be chosen? 
Here many linger before they decide. 
.-\nd different decisions are made, but 
the nobler is the choice of duty. 

Now as we have seen the necessity 
of sign-boards, let us heed them. Let 
us strive to interpret them correctly. 
Let us choose the right roads, and in 
our choosing think of the destination 
rather than the journey. 



The Danger of Superficial Learning 

H. H. Nye 



\ 



Alexander Pope in his "Essay on 
Criticism" has said, 
"A little learning is a dangerous thing ; 
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian 

spring." 

In this statement Pope has pro- 
claimed a ver}' important or vital truth. 
The truth voiced here in the early part 
of the eighteenth century held true not 
only for that period of time but it holds 
just as true to-day. We take a view 
of this broad land of ours to-day and 
note the countless thousands of young 
men and women who are as it were 
"shuffling and scampering" through 
our schools and colleges only to gain 
a small amount of superficial educa- 
tion. — a little book-learning, if you 
please, — and then rush forth into the 
1)usy world and claim to be fitted for 
success. What a pitiful and short- 
sighted view of success! What a de- 
plorable and dangerous view of edu- 
cation ! 

In this age of commercialism and 
sharp bargains, there is a tendency— a 
very strong tendency— for the Ameri- 
can youth to have a wrong impression 
of life and its meaning. There is a 
tendency for young men to go forth 
into life with the dollar-mark so in- 
delibly stamped upon their spectacles 
that they must necessarily view every 
position in life through the magnify- 
ing glass of "the dollar" and soon all 
phases of life are begun to be valued 
and measured on the basis of salaries, 
incomes, and monetary remunerations. 



and a distorted view of higher moral 
and spiritual values is manifested. So 
there is danger with our longing for 
material gain, which is however, al- 
together indispensible, to measure 
things in life by the wrong standards 
and we may be guilty of going through 
life and forgetting the best fruits of 
service and helpfulness and cling te- 
nacioush' to the fading leaves of "ma- 
terial gain, pleasure and honor. 

But Pope has said, "Drink deep, or 
taste not the Pierian spring." There 
is that small class of people that all 
through time have been striving for 
the best things in life and have from 
time to time brought about the moral 
and spiritual regeneration of society 
that has meant so much to subsequent 
ages. It is he who drinks deep from 
the fountain of knowledge that reaches 
the pure and living waters at the bot- 
tom of the spring. He who sips mere- 
ly from the surface must needs be 
satisfied with the scum, but he who 
brushes aside the scum and takes a 
deep draught from the inexhaustible 
springs of wisdom becomes infused 
with a deeper desire for more of the 
"living water." 

It is he whose knowledge is super- 
ficial that makes wrong calculations 
and harbors faulty conceptions. It is 
he whose standards are at jault and 
whose vision is limited by the dullness 
of his understanding. Herein lies the 
danger, then, of shallow learning. It 
is the one with narrow views that may 



14 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



be able to do only one thing in life and 
fill only a very humble position. He 
"takes short views, nor sees the 
lengths behind." The green valleys of 
culture, the flowing streams of wis- 
dom, and the mountain peaks of under- 
standing are hidden from his view. 

But, all hail the man who has the 
capacity and the desire to "drink deep." 
It is he whose supply is unlimited that 
can share with his weaker brother and 
impart the blessing to him who stands 
in need. He that resorts constantly to 
the shrine of wisdom and the fount of 
knowledge whence are the boundless 
issues of life, receives new inspiration, 
enlarges his horizon, sees the sunny 
\alleys lying unexplored before him, 
and the unmeasured peaks rising dimly 
in the distance. Does such a one need 
a more brilliant scene to spur him on? 
Would you say that such a man can be 
overwhelmed by a few obstacles in his 
way? Will he permit the burning sun 



of adversity to languish him? No, to 
such "new distant scenes of endless 
science rise" and "they tremble to sur- 
vey the growing labors of their length- 
ened way." To such wisdom and ser- 
vice to others is pre-eminent in life. 

After all what docs it mean to be 
truly educated, to have wisdom, and to 
possess knowledge? Home says, "It 
is the proper adjustment to one's en- 
vironment and to God." He is truly 
educated who is prep:"-ed to perform 
the duties that come to his hand and 
whatever tasks his envirdnment im- 
poses upon him, whether it be in busi- 
ness, in the school, in the shop, in the 
Sunday school or in the Church. Only 
he who can fill the various positions in 
life acceptably and honorably, who has 
learned to appreciate fully the good 
existing all around him, and who has 
acquired the ability to adjust himself 
in the various avenues of life, has 
"drunk deep at the Pierian spring." 



Patriotism 

Elizabeth R. Miller. 



Through all history from the begin- 
ning of civilization, the word patriot- 
ism has been ringing in the ears and 
hearts of men. Patriotism to our 
country is what I wish to emphasize. 

A country is not only to be con- 
sidered as a vast tract of land dotted 
with rivers, mountains, cities, and 
lakes, but it is a principle. Patriotism 
is a feeling of loyalty to that principle. 
It is devotion to its happiness. It is 
acts of piety and benevolence. It is 
a deed of heroism and self-sacrifice. 



Let us then realize it to be a great 
privilege to serve our country as best 
we can. Let us realize the grand heri- 
tage of this blessed country as our 
heritage. It is only because of ages 
gone by, the years of toil and struggle 
which our ancestors passed through, 
that this country, this heritage is what 
it is. It is because of long, weary 
hours of meditation and devotion on 
the part of our great heroes that we 
are enjoying the freedom and liberty 
of this land. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



They formed the ideal constitution 
of our great nation. They sacrificed 
their children for the benefit of their 
country and offered even themselves 
for the welfare of the future genera- 
tions. 

Should not that feeling of loyalty 
which actuated Washington, Lincoln, 
Daniel Webster, and other patriots, 
continually arouse us to action? 
Should we be so indifferent as to for- 
get the great responsibility resting on 
us? 

The problems of the present day are 
becoming more and more complex. 
Let us then be loyal. Let us go forth 
with new zeal, and face the responsi- 
bilities bravely. It is necessary for 
the rising generation to prepare them- 
selves to be heroes, because in the next 
generation this noble heritage and the 
affairs of our blessed country will rest 
largely on the shoulders of the boys 
and the girls of to-day. 

Let us think for a moment of Ar- 
nold von Winkelricd, of Nathan Hale, 
and of George Washington. They 
were called to service and they re- 
sponded. They endured many hard- 



ships in being loyal to their country. 
They gave their service. They sacri- 
ficed their lives, thus depriving them- 
selves of a life of ease and pleasure, 
because they felt that it was a point 
of duty. 

When, for instance, an unworthy 
candidate is running for the presidency 
of our nation, duty demands that all 
voters should vote against him. Then 
do not stand idly by and discuss the 
question to your neighbor. Do not 
try to escape when you ought to be 
in the battle helping to wipe out the 
great evils of this land. 

Fellow-citizens! Let us study the 
problems which confront our nation, 
and we will be more able to do acts of 
justice. Let us stand for the right. 
Let us prove ourselves heroes instead 
of cowards. We see from the begin- 
ning of History, — and it will go on 
through ages to come, — a noble army 
of martyrs fighting bravely for theix 
country. May we not be among the 
mighty army upholding the right? 
Certainly! Let us then do our small 
part and be trulv patriotic to our coun- 
try. 





EDITORIAL BOARD 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, Editor-in-Chief 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 



Mary G. Hershey. .. 
Robert J. Ziegler 

Nora L. Reber 

Naomi Longenecker. 



. School Nbtes 



• Homerlan News 
...K. L. S. News 



J. D. Reber Alumni Notes 

Isaac J. Kreider E^xcnanges 

J. H. Gingrich Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider Art Editor 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year by EUzabethtown 

College. 
This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their tiles, 

and arrearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates: — Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for $2.00. 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the EUzabethtown Postoffice. 



Riding Classic Ponies 

One of the unfortunate habits of 
our college students in America is the 
use of the Handy Literal Translations 
of the Latin and the Greek classics. 
This attempt at inter-linear knowl- 
edge is made by practically all the 
students in some of our colleges. On 
inquiry at several large bookstores, 
one will find that the sale of transla- 
tions is almost equal to that of the 
classics in the original. This gives an 
insight into the extent of their use 
from an outside point of view. 



If this manner of studying the Latin 
and the Greek classics were not detri- 
mental to the best interests of college 
students, we would remain silent, or 
perhaps encourage the use of trans- 
lations, or "ponies" in college parlance. 
The chief end in the study of the 
classics is the development of mental 
power. This is more important than 
a mere temporary knowledge of a 
translation. The literary value of a 
classic must be felt in terms of the 
original, many idioms of which have 
no exact equivalents in English. A 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



translation, which is hurriedly passed 
over by a student, will eventually de- 
stroy the capability of a student for 
sight reading, because it deprives him" 
of his originality in grasping the 
thought of a Latin sentence at a 
glance. It teaches him to fit a Latin 
text on a prepared English translation, 
instead of calling forth an English 
translation for a Latin expression. 
Studying Latin or Greek with a trans- 
lation is the reverse process of what 
true and beneficial study of the classics 
should be. 

To this method of studying the clas- 
sics we find three objections first, it 
deprives the student of mind culture; 
secondly, it discourages the painstak- 
ing student who uses no translation ; 
thirdly, it robs the student of his in 
•dividuality of expression. There is, 
however, some benefit to be derived 
from the use of a translation, but the 
temptation for its abuse is too alluring 
to permit its use. 

Since mind culture is the chief end 
of the study of the classics, the means 
of study should be adapted to securing 
that end. The student who uses an 
inter-linear translation has all the 
words modifying an other placed to- 
gether with the translation below them. 
This robs him o,f much power in see- 
ing case relations. It also tells him 
what use of a particular case is meant. 
The student should himself discover 
an ablative absolute, a subjective geni- 
tive, or an optative subjunctive, with 
out having it suggested to him by an 
English literal translation. Some stu- 
dents who use inter-linear translations 
know less of conjugations and declen- 
sions in the sophomore year than they 
did in the second year of their prepara- 



tory work. This is largely due to the 
use of translations, especially of inter- 
linear Comparison of minute details, 
so necessary to precision in all school 
work, is weakened when the student 
himself does not find the words that 
modify another. 

It is self-evident that less concen- 
tration is required in the study of 
Latin and Greek by the use of a trans- 
lation. Probably this is the chief rea- 
son why students resort to transla 
tions. If college life does not teach a 
young man to concentrate, it has miss- 
ed its aim. It is not the actual knowl- 
edge of a few classics that is aimed 
at in the study of Latin and Greek, but 
the power to concentrate the mind on 
the solution of relations existing be- 
tween words. In advanced courses an 
appreciation of the classic read may be 
aimed at in addition to mind culture. 
If literary appreciation of these great 
classics were aimed at chiefly, we 
would study them in some good trans- 
lation in our own tongue. The stu- 
dent who uses a translation may read 
his Latin and Greek more fluently for 
the time being, but one who "goes it 
on foot" receives that which is far 
better than a temporary fluency of 
translation. For his pains in con- 
structing his own translation he re- 
ceives mind culture, which can be ap- 
plied to the solution of the problems of 
life. The proper study of the ancient 
classics requires concentration ; this 
is the reason why we study these 
classics. 

The use of a translation does away 
with the use of a dictionary. This is 
harmful to a student in spite of what 
many say with reference to groping 
one's way among a multitude of mean- 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ings. When a nuiiil:)er of meanings are 
presented it requires judgment and the 
exercise of choice. The student who 
uses a translation does not need to ex- 
ercise any judgment at all, for that 
has been done by another for him. To 
be sure the "pony" method is the 
easiest way, but the one who digs out 
his own classics receives the benefits of 
a classical course. The former method 
is tlie path of least resistance; the 
latter, the path of toil and care. The 
former gives good appearance ; the lat- 
ter, lasting benefits. Should the pro- 
fessors ill some of our colleges demand 
the sale of all translations and require 
each student to give his own trans- 
lation, a mighty wail of woe would 
arise from our colleges. Why? Be- 
cause it would require concentration, 
the exercise of judgment, and the care- 
ful analysis of details,— the end of 
genuine study of the ancient classics. 
We are glad, however, that there are 
some students who refrain from the 
temptations to use translations. This 
is very difficult because a student who 
uses a translation can cover more 
ground than the student who uses no 
translation. Consequently, the one 
who works out his own translation 
can not cover the lesson assigned with- 
out injustice to his other studies, or 
else not thoroughly prepare his lesson. 
\\'e believe that professors ought to 
take notice of such students and give 
them all the encouragement possible, 
because they deserve it. We know of 
instances where such students received 
low grades when they were receiving 
as much mental culture as those re- 
ctiving the higher grades. This is 
downright injustice to honest, pains- 
taking students. 



We desire to state further that grad- 
uates who used translations do not 
generally become efficient instructors 
in the elements of the ancient lan- 
guages. A thorough knowledge of the 
declensions and the conjunctions is es- 
sential to the efficient teaching of the 
elements, and this is just where "pony- 
riders" are weak. The more difficul- 
ties a teacher has solved himself, the 
better he is able to assist others in 
solving them. A teacher of Latin who 
would be successful must know why a 
translation is worded as it is, or he 
will soon be put to the wall by a class 
of students using translations. This 
knowledge comes only by digging out 
Latin and Greek lessons from the 
original and not from a translation. 

Another harmful influence of the 
translation is that it robs the student 
of his own individuality of expression. 
There is nothing so valuable to a stu- 
dent as originality of expression. This 
is seriously crippled by the use of a 
translation. The Latin and the Greek 
class should both aim at correct Eng- 
lish expression. W'e believe that as 
much English style could be taught 
in the foreign language departments 
of our colleges as in the English de- 
partment itself. We admit, however, 
that most of our modern translations 
are made by scholars who use good 
Englishs and are practically true to 
foreign idioms, but after all they rep- 
resent only a few expressions of the 
great classics. Every student ought 
to put his own personality and individ- 
uality of style into a translation. This 
he docs not do while slavishly aping 
some translation. Do not work the 
"horse," work the original. 

There is also a tendency for one who 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



uses a translation to become weak in 
liis vocabulary. When he compares a 
translation with the original he sees 
"but one word, but if he uses a diction- 
ary and searches for a word he feels 
the breadth of the Latin or Greek word 
and becomes rich in synonyms, the 
secret of a virile style. Etymological 
study should be encouraged in the 
study of classics. This would then 
give breadth of expression to the stu- 
dent. Translations are too narrow and 
too confined. The parts of verbs, and 
the declension of nouns are as a rule 
unknown to the "handy literalist." Not 
so to the one who uses the dictionary. 
The translation has its place, but not 
in the hands of the student who is pur- 
suing a course in the ancient lan- 



guages. The one who desires to be- 
come acquainted with some of these 
early masterpieces, and who desires to 
study them with a view to literary ap- 
preciation, should secure the best pos- 
sible translation, if he is not able to 
read them in the original. We hope 
the translation habit may be broken in 
our colleges, and that students may 
delve into these classics with a view to 
mind culture, not to temporary fluency 
of translation. Teachers will aid in 
this movement by strongly encourag- 
ing the few who abstain from them 
and by disapproving of their use. May 
the ancient classics always remain in 
the curricula and be studied the proper 
way so as to secure the culture charac- 
teristic only of their study. 



-^-^yf^^K^ 




s 



h 







Mo 







t 



ts 



School Notes 

"They speak of Spring — the waking 

leaves and singing of the birds, 
The music and the songs that never 

yet were set to words; 
The growing green, the lengthening 

days, the ever-deep'ning blue, 
The feeling that the world is good, and 

every friend is true." 

There is something in the spirit of 
Spring which not only stirs the Poet 
but thrills every human heart. Col- 
lege Hill now manifests many an ex- 
pression of Spring time and of the 
Spring spirit. The boys have caught 
the spirit and are seen about the camp- 
us pitching ball. The base ball dia- 
mond is now the scene of hard work 
cheerfully done, prompted by the an- 
ticipation of the games to come in the 
future. Summer frocks suggest green 
grass and nodding flowers of the 
Spring time. Here someone is plan- 
ning an arbutus outing; there a group, 
a botanizing tramp. 

With the sunrise are now found 
many early risers who are seeking the 
refreshment and inspiration of the 
morning dawn. Not only at the dawn 
of (lav but also at its close is the sun 



a witness of the life on College Hill. 
On one part of the campus may be 
seen a group pitching ball ; on another 
Miss Myer tossing bean bags . The 
walks are crowded with frolicking roll- 
er skaters, our little visitors from town. 
The concrete walks resound with the 
tread of the students strolling leisurely 
and happily about or walking briskly 
with a purpose or errand in view. Now 
and then the college is fortunate 
enough to be entertained with music 
while the students are in the dining 
room, for the Crimson Rambler by the 
window is often the spot chosen by a 
happy robin who desires to voice his 
sentiments of the season. If you 
were to stop outside the door of Music 
Hall at the 11.20 period you would dis- 
cover that the chorus class too has 
caught the spring spirit. 

Not only is the spring spirit mani- 
fested on the hill. .^ spirit of interest 
and loyalty to his class was shown 
by Prof. Meyer's thoughtfulness in 
trimming the Crimson Rambler which 
the class of 1905 planted. 

Mr. Wenger said he is getting 
"Wi.'^e?" 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



LECTURE 

J. F. Chambers will give a lecture in 
the College Chapel on April 17, on a 
delightful theme, "A Grand Army 
Man." We hope many will come to 
hear him. 

Last week an enthusiastic suffra- 
gette announced in chapel a meeting 
of all persons interested in equal suf- 
frage to be held in Room A. In answer 
to this call a large number responded 
and Miss Kline was chosen to preside. 
A number of the ideas were exchanged 
but as yet no permanent organization 
has resulted. The meeting was jovial 
throughout yet helpful. 

Miss Naomi Longenecker who is 
serving as president of the Keystone 
Literary Society has proved herself 
very efificient in that office. 

Why is Miss Mary Elizabeth all 
smiles when she receives those type- 
written letters? 

Miss Katherine Miller paid a visit 
to her niece and nephew at Juniatji 
College and also to Miss Elsie Stayer 
during our Spring Term vacation. 
While at the college she had the pleas- 
ure of attending a recital given by the 
class in "Expression". 

About twenty of our students and 
teachers went to the home of Elder S. 
H. Hertzler in town last evening and 
stole stealthily to the side of his house 
and serenaded him and his bride with 
songs. They were invited inside and 
after congratulating them and spend- 
ing a little social time together they 
returned to the college having spent 
an enjoyable evening. 

A few of the students attended the 
commencement exercises of the Milton 
Grove High School on the evening of 



March 27. Dr. D. C. Reber gave the 
address of the evening, his subject be- 
ing "Education: Its Meaning and Pur- 
pose." His discourse was interesting 
and highly instructive. 

On the evening of March 28 Profes- 
sor and Mrs. Schlosser entertained the 
lady teachers of the Elizabethtown 
Faculty at supper. 

We wonder why Miss Mary Eliza- 
beth gets so much more pleasure out 
of a walk taken with a "Camera" (?) 
than most people do. 

About a dozen of our students and 
teachers attended a piano forte recital 
given by the famous musician Pade- 
rewski, at Harrisburg, on Monday 
evening, March 31. 

Do not forget the Arbor Day pro- 
gram to be given by the Seniors on 
April 24. 

Have you noticed how the corners of 
Mr. Moyer's mouth turn up when he 
receives an eight page letter? 

Miss Helen Mohler of Ephrata, 
spent several days at the college as a 
guest of her cousin, Hiss Laura Landis. 

Miss Horst is a reader of the "Old 
Ladies' Home Journal." Any other 
old ladies who desire this magazine 
will please give their order to Miss 
Horst. 

Sometime ago Miss L. F.'s room was 
all topsy turvy. That night she dream- 
ed she was given six brooms. What a 
strange coincidence ! 

Dr. C. C. Ellis of Juniata College, 
gave a lecture at Lancaster, a few 
weeks ago. A few of our students 
were down to hear him. 

Miss Lila Shimp is recovering from 
a slight attack of pneumonia. We hope 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



she will soon be able to resume her 
school work. 

Henry Ober, Jr. has been on the 
sick list for some time, but we are 
glad to say that he is improving. 

Most of the students have returned 
for the Spring Term. Many who will 
finish their school terms will return 
next week. All the ladies' dormitories 
are occupied, even the guest room. 

Professor Harley and Jacob Ging- 
rich took a trip to Scranton during the 
Spring vacation and attended three of 
"Billy" Sunday's services. They en- 
joyed them very much. On Wednesday 
evening they gave the student body 
an account of their trip. Professor 
Ilarley says "Billy" cannot be de- 
scribed, and that one can almost see 
the devil limp away when he receives a 
whack from Billy, and that one must 
almost pity the devil. 

On \\'cdnesday evening, March 25, 
Elder S. H. Hertzler, "Uncle Sam" to 
the College family, was married to 
Sister Mary Ziegler of Royersford, Pa. 
The ceremony was performed by Eld. 
Jesse Ziegler, president of the Board of 
Trustees of ElizabetHtown College. 
The whole school family join in ex- 
tending their best wishes to our "Aunt 
Mary" and congratulate Eld. Hertzler 
on bringing into our midst his bride 
from Montgomery County. The bride 
is a sister to Miss Kathryn Ziegler, one 
of our graduates who is now a mission- 
ary in the India field. 

Because of the relation Eld. Hertzler 
hears to the school, we, the school 
family, desire the presence of the new- 
ly married couple at the College some 
evening in the near future for becom- 
ing better acquainted. 



K. L. S. Notes 

The Keystone Literary Society met 
in Literary session on March 6. The 
first feature on the program was an in- 
augural address by the newly elected 
president. J. Replogle then gave a 
humorous reading entitled "Burdock's 
Goad." The Society then sang "I Can- 
not Sing The Old Songs." An ora- 
tion entitled "Success' was then ren- 
dered in a very interesting manner by 
Frank Wise. Then followed a debate, 
Resolved, That Whittier was a great- 
er poet than Longfellow. The debat- 
ers, Mary Hershey and Ephriam 
Meyer on the affirmative side, and 
Anna Cassel and Harry Royer on the 
negative side, showed that they had 
given time and thought to their work, 
for the speeches were very interesting. 
In general debate there were quoted 
many beautiful passages from both 
poets. Bertha Perry and Lila Shimp 
then sang a duet, and as usual, they 
pleased the audience. They sang 
"Pond Lilies," and "A Summer Night." 
After that the Literary Echo was read 
by the editor, Owen Hershey. 

The first feature on the program 
rendered March 13, was a song entitled 
"When the Twilight Shadows Fall." 
It was sung by Messrs. Falkenstein, 
Geyer, Zug and Engle. The song was 
of a high standard and appreciated by 
all. Eva Brubaker then recited "Ar- 
butus" and "Innocence." The selec- 
tions were well recited. An impromptu 
debate then followed. The question 
chosen by the affirmative speaker, 
Harry Moyer, was. Resolved, That 
country life is better than city life. 
The negative speaker was Robert Zeig- 
ler. These speakers treated the sub- 
ject in a creditable maimer. George 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



Neff then gave a declamation entitled 
"The Last Salute." He showed much 
improvement in delivery and articula- 
tion. A mixed quartette then sang a' 
"Medley." This as well as the other 
musical numbers which have been ren- 
dered lately deserve commendation 
for both choristers and singers. Reuben 
Zeigler discussed the question, "What 
is the value of a Business Course?" A 
humorous reading was then given by 
Ruth Landis. It was recited in a very 
pleasing manner. The program ended 
with a song, "Juanita" by the Society. 

Homerian News 

The editor has very little news for 
the readers of this issue. This per- 
haps is not so much the fault of the 
editor as of the Society. Vacation 
and other extra programs called our 
work to a halt. A society of this kind 
should be so active as to make it pos- 
sible for any editor to be able to report 
news at any time. We need to put 
more energy into our work. Our 



members are not given enough work to 
keep them in proper relation to their 
society. Our private meetings should 
have more literary features. The new 
speaker for this term is C. J. Rose ; 
\'ice President, L J. Kreider; Record- 
ing Secretary, Laura Landis; Chaplain, 
R. W. Schlosser; Critic J. G. Meyer; 
Monitor, Orpha Harshberger; Review- 
ers. H. K. Ober and D. C. Reber. 

SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY 

Every friend and former student of Eliza, 
bethtown College should be sure not to ciiss 
the thirteenth anniversary of the Keystone 
Literary Society and the third joint anni- 
versary with the Homerian Literary Socie- 
ty on April 10, 1914. 

We feel sure that no one will regret hav. 
ing come, because a good program has been 
prepared. Mr. Jacob E. Myers, '11, who will 
graduate at Ursinus Colle?e this year, will 
deliver an oration. The main feature of the 
program will be an address by Dr. Charles 
H. Gordinier, professor of Latin and Greek 
at the Millersville State Normal School. 
His subject will be: "What is a Man 
Worth " Come one, come al. and bring 
your friends. 




At our last business meeting the 
following officers were elected: 

President, James Breitigan ; ist Vice 
President, Harry Nye ; 2nd Vice Presi- 
dent, Edgar Diehm ; 3rd Vice Presi- 
dent, Francis Olweiler; Recording 
Secretary, C. L. Martin ; Correspond- 
ing Secretary, Lilian Falkenstein ; 
Treasurer, J. D. Reber. 

Executi\'o Committee: Ralph W. 
Schlosscr: J. G. Meyer, Gertrude Mil- 
ler. 

We print these here in case any have 
not been officially notified that they 
may consider themselves notified, and 
make preparations for our next meet- 
ing. The next meeting will be held on 
June 10 immediately after the lunch- 
eon. We hope that all will arrange to 
be present at this meeting. 

The Treasurer of the Endowment 
Fund Committee reported that quite 
a few of those who had pledged them- 
selves for a certain amount payable 
yearly were rather delinquent in ful- 



filling their promises. There is no 
mere opportune timt to pay this than 
at our regular meeting during Com- 
mencement week. The committee is 
in need of funds since there are quite a 
few students at the college who need 
financial support. 

The business meeting will be follow- 
ed by a public program at 8 p. m. The 
program has not yet been fully ar- 
ranged for, but we hope to print it in 
the next issue. Plan your work so 
you can be present and then work your 
plan. 

Kathryn Moyer, '10, is making an 
enviable record for herself at Oberlin 
College, Ohio. Miss Moyer entered 
this college as a regular freshman on 
her Pedagogical Diploma without an 
entrance examination and is now doing 
splendid woYk in the upper half of the 
freshman class which consists of sev- 
eral hundred students. This puts our 
school on the list of accredited colleges 
for entrance to Oberlin College. 




Regard not then if wit be old or new, 
But blame the false, and value still the 

true. 
Some ne'er advance a judgment of 

their own, 
But catch the spreading notion of the 

town ; 
They reason and conclude by prece- 
dent, 
And own stale nonsense which they 

ne'er invent; 
Some judge of authors' names, not 

works, and then 
Nor praise, nor blame the writings, 
but the men. Alexander Pope. 

The web of our life is of a mingled 
yarn, good and ill together. 

Shakespeare 

The Philomathean Monthly— Your 
paper is attractive and the literary 
articles are instructive. The article, 
"Education and Ideal Citizenship," 
brings out the importance of an early 
training and also shows that a broad 
foundation means a happy life and as a 
result a happy nation. The Editorial 
is very brief but to the point. The 
school life is well portrayed. 

The Mirror — Your Editorial is ap- 



propriate. The poem is true to life. 
A few additional literary articles would 
add interest to your good magazine 
and at the same time would make it 
more proportionate. 

The Daleville Leader— We admire 
your society spirit. After reading 
"The Price of American Liberty," we 
can only realize how happy a life we 
are living. There are two statements 
brought out in"Life on the Farm" that 
are very true. These are: "The farm 
is the natural abode of man," and "the 
city life for the most is a thing alto- 
gether artificial." A table of con- 
tents is missing in your paper. 

The Pattersonian— An interesting 
little High School paper. 

The Bayonet — Get busy and orga- 
nize a permanent literary society. 
Your otherwise good magazine does 
not seem complete without a literary 
department. You deserve much credit 
for your poems. 

The Palmerian — Your paper is im- 
proving right along. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



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ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 

»<t« l I 11 ** * * 4 ***** * * ** ***** * * * 



The Pratt 
Teachers' Agency 

70 Fifth Avenue 
New York 

Receives calls at all seasons for col- 
lege and normal graduates, specialists 
and other teachers in co'.leges, public 
and private schools in all parts ot fhe 
country. 

Advises parents about schools. 

WM. O. PRATT, Manager. 

Plain Suits Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats 

CANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange Stb. 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Kodaks and Supplies Athletic Goods 

Kodaks and supplies of all kinds al- 
ways on hand in the famous Eastman 
quality. Don't forget us when in need 
of supplies for in or out door sports. 

HARRY K. DORSHEIMER 

Exclusive agency for Hopewell Choc- 
olate Dainties. 

School Supplies. Cutlery 



Mention 



College Times '' 



Writing. 



HI 



iiiBiiuiBiiiiininaiiiiaiiiiK 

iG.Wm.REISNER 

" Manufacturing 

" Jeweler 

= College Jewelry of the Better Sort. 

g Class Pins and Rings, Prize Cups, Fra- 

B ternity Jewelry, Medals. 

B Watches Diamonds Jewelry 

1 120 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 

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CENTRAL 
MEAT MARKET 

All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meats. 

H. H. GOOD, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



W,E DO IT RIGHT 



Shoe Repairing 



S. K. BARNES & SON 



♦♦' HI I IH"H . < . < * H - »< "»- M - 4"l"H"H - * * 



; F. T. MUTH 



H. M. MUTH 



MUTH BROS- 



LUMBERoi 

Also all kinds of building material . . 
and mill work, Slate and Cement, • • 
Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent 
Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board.etc. 
COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. ; 

We ai.^ to give you a square deal 
that will merit your trade and friend- 
ship. 



'-LIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Pre ...Jill and Marshall 
College, Lancaster, Pa. 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Offers liberal courses in 

ARTS and SCIENCES. 

Campus of fifty-four acres with ten 
buildings including Gymnasium and 
complete Athletic Field. 

For catalogue apply to 
HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAH 



Horseshoeing a 
N. Market Street, 



Specialty. 

Elizabethtown^ 



P. D. CROPP & BRO. 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARSLET ST. 



Carry 
This Pen 
Upside Down . 



— if you want to. Yes. in any posi- 
bon, any pocket 

Boys: carry the Parker Jack Knife 
Pen in your trousers pocket alons 
v*-i:h your keys. 

Girls: carry it in the pocket of 
your white blouse. 



leavina a pinhead spot of ink any- 
where it has been carrjed. 

Write? Just imagine a pci o 
glass thai melts to ink as you =:. J i 
across paper! TTiat'sthewayitwr. ^ 

Price $2.50 up. Gel one en- ' 
Take it back any tL-ne wii .m 
days if you're not ticUed to ci_. ^ 
with it. We authorize dealer t- > i 
fund. If youi dealer doesn't carr, 
Parkers, write us for catalog iod^-:j 



IMREk 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 



Seven Reasons : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Grovv'ing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 



Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Students Will Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



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IMPORTANT ! 

' «*^ /^ > w^i f m^i f i w^/l^ I mik/ ' 



STUDENTS ! k 



'*inf 



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DO YOU KNOW THAT 

It is only because of the kind patronage of our business and 
our professional men in this town and elsewhere, that this maga- 
zine exists. They have indeed shown themselves friends of Our 
College and of "Our College Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to 
buy anything, to consider first those who by their advertising 
have made this magazine possible. 

We have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all 
respects. 



Business Manager of "Our College Times." 



Mr 



* <ftr 'wMr 



■Mr 



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READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



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I First Showing | 

I OF THE NEW | 

I Fall Shoes 1 1 



Every Style^-every wanted 
Leather — every new shape 
— is here, ready for your In- 
spection. Will you stop In 
to see them today 7 

LYNCH & EBY 

"No Shoes Over 83.00" 



24 North Queen St., 



LANCASTER, 



ADVERTISE 



IN 



'OUR COLLEGE TIMES' 



♦♦♦♦ » ♦♦■ >< ■ I ' HI -*I Hm |i I I I I HH . t »»» 



30 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



We ELIZABETHTOvVN HERALD 



$1.00 A 
Estimates on any kind of Job Printing. 



♦4 . 4 ..1.. H , j .. i .i | .. l .. l .. l . 1 . n I .. H .. | .. H .. | .. H ..|.' |mH .»4. 



J. N. OLWEILER; 



CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. ', 
Shipped every Wednesday. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'. 



DENTIST 

GEO. R. KERSEY 
Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

"X^ATcAiivT 

store Adjoining Federal Room 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - - - PENN'A 

JOHN A. FISHER 

BARBER 

Centre Square, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



jpiiHiiaiii;aii':iniiiaiiiiiniii:Biiiiniiiiaiiiiniiii:Bi!iiHMiMiiiin 

I JOS. H. RIDER & SON I 



AGENCY FOR 

SPALDING'S 



YEAR 

Linotyping for the Trade. 

The place to buy 
Stationery, Pennants, Souvenir Goods, Post 
Cards, and hundreds of articles for your 
pleasure and convenience. Our candies are 
always fresh. LAWRY'S VARIETY STORE, 
Half Block S. of Center Sq., Elizabethtown. 

Boggs Hardware Store 

The best there is in hardware at the 
lowest possible prices. Prompt and cour- 
teous service. TRY US. 



D. B. KLINE 



CHOICE GROCERIES 



West High Street, 



AND PROVISIONS 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



CEO. A. FISHEr| 

Hardware - 

Phonog^raphs 



And 

Records 

ELIZABETHTOWN, 



I Baseballi Tennis Goods I 



11 



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11 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Beet Grades of 

FIX>Tm AND FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, 

hay and straw 

ELIZABETH'iV. »VN, - PENN A. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



The Book Store 



1 BOOKS, BIBLES, SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

i MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 

I G. N. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. f 



iMiiiHii;i!Bi'ii»ii;ii»>i!iat:'iiniiiHiiiiBiiimiiiniiiiB!iii 



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Seven thousand people buy WALK- 
OVER shoes every day— certainly 
there must be much merit In a shoe 
to attain such popularity — 
In addition to the better quality or 
our shoes we offer our better man- 
ner of serving you. 

WALK-OVER 

SHOE STORE 

HUNTZBERGER-WINTERS CO. 

Department Store 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'A 



MIESSE'S ICE CREAM 

adds ZEST to the MEAL 

Sold in Elizabethtown by 

J. S. GROSS. 

B^aintinG anb iPaper 

IbanQing 

AMOS B. DRACE 



Spalding Sporting Goods 

Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 
Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic 
Shoes. Kodaks and Cameras, de- 
I veloping and finishing. 



H . B . HH R R 
30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



Est. 1884 Est. 1884 

KIRK JOHNSON CS, CO. 

Pianos, Player-Pianos, Victrolas, Sheet Music, Musical Mdse. 
16-18 W. King Street. LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Pationage 



Elizabethtown Exchange 
i^ank 



Transacts a general banking business. 

Pays Interest on time deposits. 

Solicits your patronage. 

OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President. ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice. Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 









DIRECTORS 








A. G. Heisey 






Jos. G. Heisey 






J. H. Buch 


Allen A. Coble 






Dr. H. K. Blough 






Dr. A. M. Kalbach 


H. J. Gish 






Henry E. Landis 






Geo. D. Boggs 




E. 


E. 


Hernley 


B. 


H. 


G raider 



TAKE YOUR 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morn- 
ing. Returns Wednesday & Friday afternoon 

Ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 
Catalogues a Specialty 



311 W. Grant St., 



LANCASTER, PA. 



1 D. G 


. BRINSER • 


jCoal 


Grain, Flour, 
Seeds, Hay, 
and Fertilizer. 


Feed, I 
Straw { 


S Bell 


& Ind. 


Phones 


> 
J 


/ Rheems 


, 


- 


:ii 



IIIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIiaillllBIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIBin 

O. N. HEISEY 



i Provisions, Groceries and Choice Candies | 

i 



HEISEY BUILDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



O^'^^'V^ 



Men Wanted 5 

r.i\e Nature a Chance 

W'iiat iXfy Life Shall Be 10 

he Ijimits of Nature 11 

The Delights of Alan 12 

ing on Foundation 14 

:D]T0RIAL:— 

lie a Sun-Dial 15 

SCHOOL NOTES iS 

The Summer Term 20 

llomerian News 21 

K. L,. S. Notes 21 

Athletics 21 

Alumni .... 24 

F.xchanges 25 




Our AdvertiBers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 

HERTZLER'S 
Department Store 



Your needs supplied at satisfactory 
prices in Dry Goods, Groceries, Ready- 
to-Wear Clothing for Men and Women 
of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oil- 
cloth, Shoes, etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 

CLOTHING 

International Tailoring Co., N. Y. 

American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chi- 
cago. 
Up-to-Date Samples on Hand. 



Black Cat 

Hosi<i^ry hertzler bros. & CO. 

Cemtre Square ElJZabethtOWII, Pa. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits, $164,000 

General Accounts Solicited. Interest Paid on Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent. 

DIRECTORS 

W. S. Smith Elmer W. Strlckler Peter N. Rutt 

F. W. Groff. J. S. Rlsser B. L. Geyer 

El, C. Glnder Amos G. Coble E. H. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



ipiiiiiBniniiiiiBininiiiiiaiiiiHinaBiiiniiiiininiiiiHiiHiiiiBiiiiiB 
I BUCHANAN & YOUNG 

I 115 & 117 N. Queen St., 

1 LANCASTER, - PENN'A 

■ 

i 
I 
I 



Distinctive Styles 

In 



I Coats, Suits, Dresses, 
1 and Waists 



m Whether it is a Coat. Dress or 

a Waist, you are sure to find our styles 

I distinctive, we mean authorative 

I styles that duplicate the mode with- 

I out going to the extreme, for they 

I are always in good taste. 

1 Coats and Suits 

^ In Misses Suits and Coats, Spring 

= heralds her coming with many charm- 

m ing conceptions liere, each of which 

I asserts style correctness in no un- 

I certain way, there is a "touch and go" 

I a "smartness" — about the lines and 

I new ideas that are most effective 

J becoming. 

I Dresses at tlie Style Store 

S Cool, fresh, danty Dresses with a ^ 
I stylish dash of color that gives a 
pretty finish to neck, waist and bor- 
der, distinguished, charming 
in Silks, Lingerie Dresses now invite 
critical inspection, YOUR inspection, 
young lady. 



Waists 

g Waists that will relieve the ever- 

B lasting monotony and sameness, dls- 

B tinctvie, new models in smart effects 

I that will become a surprisingly large 

I nmber of girla who seek excluslve- 

M ness of styles. 




Students Will Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



., IMPORTANT! STUDENTS! I 



Q-Ww. 



DO YOU KNOW THAT 

It is only because of the kind patronage of our business and 
OLr profeEsicnal men in this town and elsewhere, that this maga- 
zine exists. They have indeed shown themselves friends of Our 
College and of "Our College Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you. when about to 
buy anything, to consider first those who by their advertising 
have rr.ac.e this magazine possible. 

We have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all 
respects. 

Business Manager of "Oi:r College Times." 



READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



•4A»- 



tJf^m li^ l/ W' 



t^i^—iit^f^m i«^ | W« ^ 



Bllllllllllittlli:ilLBIiff"inBIIIMIIi::il)<:!K::iB'»iKllinillBIIIBIllI t^ 

i ^ I 

I First Showing | I 

B tW THE" MP-fA/ a * 



OF THE NEW 



I Fall Shoes [ 



Every Style — every wanted 
Leather — every new shape 
— is here, ready for your in- 
spection. Will you stop in 
to see them today ? 

LYNCH & EBY 

"No Shoes Over «3.00 " 

24 North Queen St., 
LANCASTER, PENN'A 



ADVERTISE 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES' 



♦ I 1 1 1 1 1 I II 1 1 11 1 1 > * ♦♦♦* * ♦♦ 1 1 >♦♦ 



(§m OloUpgp (TtmpH 



ELiZABin-HTovrN, Pa., May, 1914 



Men Wanted. 

Geo. C. Capetanios. 



Gentlemen, t'.ie crying need of the 
hour is for manhood, not legislation, 
not organization, not agitation, but 
men. The need of the American na- 
tion is not -ailway extension, not wes- 
tern irrigation, not a new navy, not a 
lower tariff, net a bigger wheat and 
corn crop, not wealth and power, but 
men. When Napoleon was asked what 
was the greatest need of the French 
nation he replied in one word, "nuth- 
( rs." And if I were to answer the 
(|iiestinn, — what England, China, Ja- 
pan, Greece, and America need most I 
would answer in these words, "Men 
"f piety, c nviction. and sobriety." The 
^reat crisis that threatens the nation 
now is the lack of leaders in every de- 
partment of national life. The nation 
wants men with foresight and moral 
courage, to reform politics. One live 
and able leader in a community is 
worth more than a whole cemetery full 
I if respectable coroners and grave-dig- 
gers. The true leader gives a new 
thought, a new aspiration, and a new 
tine to the strivings of each day. It 
is true that he makes mistakes, but he 
makes progress too and lifts other 
l)eoi)le from the narrow vision of their 
environments to see more in life and 
more of the skv. The nation is looking 



for men like Cromwell, Frederick the 
Great, and Daniel Wtebster. 

The cry come not only from the 
nation and the state but from every de- 
partment of human activity. The farm 
needs men with genius and modern 
ideas , men who will cultivate the soil, 
so as to produce the best crops. We 
need men at the head of our institu- 
'tions of learning to administer our 
educational systems. 

We need them in the church. Never 
before was the demand so intense as it 
is now for men to restore the ideals and 
teachings of the New Testament 
Church. There was a time when, if a 
young man went to college and if he 
could not make anything of himself, 
he was sure to become a preacher, but 
the church of to-day demands the very 
best young men that the nation can 
give, and the very best that is in them. 
The church is calling for preachers 
like Noah, who will stand before their 
generation for what they believe to be 
right, it needs men like Jonah who 
sometimes would turn back, and again 
repent and then go to fulfill his mis- 
sion : she needs men like the great 
statesman Isaiah who for forty years, 
in the city of Jerusalem raised his 
v<iice against the unfaithful Jew and 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



1 

'ith ■ 



wicked world. The church wants men 
Hke the intelligent H.ebrew of Tarsys, 
who by his zeal, learning, and enthusi- 
asrh revolutionized the whole human 
race. 

The world never has too many re- 
formers like Savonarola, Martin Luth- 
er, and David Livingstone, who pene- 
trate into the unknown realms of 
thought and shake the dry bones of 
tradition and set in motion new 
thoughts and moral tides that sweep 
the peoples of all the lands of all the 
earth and of all the ages. 

But you say, sir, that we have many 
scores of millions of men on the globe 
to-day and that they are rapidly in- 
creasing. There are so many so that 
if they were to stand shoulder to 
shoulder they would encircle the globe 
over twenty-five times, or were they all 
to die at once we would have to bury 
them seven deep to encircle the globe 
once. Then, why is this cry for men 
when there is this immense number in 
the world? The question is not, how 
many men have we, but what kind of 
men do we have? It i.^ not the cjuan- 
tity we are looking for but the quality ; 
not the imitation of a man, but the 
real man. When the young bride was 
told she had a model husband, she 
went to consult the dictionary for the 
meaning of the word "model" and 
found the definition for it; "Model, — a 
small imitation of the real thing." And 
that is what a great many of us are. — 
imitations of the real man. 

A great many of us have been pass- 
ing for men continually, when we are 
not men at, all ; we have only a hundred 
pounds or more of living flesh and walk 
around the streets in a suit of clothes. 
Not anyone who is walking up and 



down the pavements of our cities with 
a high colla.r, around his neck and a 
cane in his hands and who pretends to 
let the public know that he is a man 
by smoking a cigarette, is a man. 

Then, what is man? The question 
of David, "What is man that Thou 
are mindful of him ?" has challenged 
men of mighty intellect. Man is in- 
significant in point of size. Space is 
pregnant with the handiwork of God, 
for "day unto day uttereth s;)eech and 
night unto night showeth knowledge." 
There are moons, planets, cnmets, and 
stars in comparison to all of which 
man is but a cipher. Let us place man 
beside some planet that is hundreds of 
thousands times larger than our earth 
and ask ourselves the question. "What 
is man that Thou art mindful of him?" 

There are a great many definitions 
that have been given as to what a man 
is. but they miss the mark widely. The 
one that is nearest to the mark is this, 
"A man is that individual who recog- 
nizes that he is the handiwork of God 
and tries to honor his Maker in every 
de])artnicnt of his being." ^Lin is 
God's gentleman, lie is the master- 
piece of creation, the very best that the 
Almighty could do at the creation to 
show his infinite wisdom. Even though 
God made us with our feet touching 
the earth, he also gave us minds to fly 
to the clouds and stars. God meant 
that every one should wear a crown 
but we have been so busy looking 
downward and running to gratify the 
appetites of the human flesh that we 
have not given God's angel a chance to 
place the priceless diadem upon our 
heads. Men. what kind of men have 
you bcen?A\"hcn a man applies for a 
ixisition nowadavs at the government 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



office or in the big corporations, the 
first question they ask is "What kind of 
a man are you ?" Ask yourself what 
kind of a man you have been to your 
wife, to your fellowmen, and to your 
God. Let us remember, men, that the 
one question which God will ask us is 
the day of judgment will not be how 
much wealth hive you accumulated, 
not how much jiower have you exer- 
cised, not how much fame have you 
achieveil, but wliat i<ind of a man have 
VdU Ijeen. 

Von ask why the greatest need Is 
for men. \\'e need them because the 
destiny of the nation depends on them. 
Without public-spirited officials, gov- 
ernment could not be perpetuated, 
without men of sterling worth inven- 
tit'us and scierce must cease to exist; 
without them organized society could 
net exist. The progress of civilization 
depends upon them. Material progress 
could to s me degree be adx'anced but 
Ihe true welfare of the race would not 
be promulgated. 

And we ha\e tmly three a\'enues 
through which we must p'ocure the 
reality i>f manhood; viz., the schools, 
ihe church, and the home. Our col- 
leges and universities must turn out 
better trained and better equipped men. 
\\'e can scarcely over-estimate the in- 
fluence which a band of altruistic 
teachers can exert over the youth of 
our land by instilling into them culture, 
refinement, and nobility of soul. The 
church fails utterly in her mission if 
she does not act in this world of hu- 
manity as a leaven to permeate, purify, 
and inspire this generation. The 
churcli must make better fathers, bet- 
ter business men. better preachers, and 
better statesmen. The church that 



fails to do this ought to close its doors 
and go out of iiusiness. 

But above all, we must make the 
men through the home, because the 
home is greater than the nation. I 
say greater, because long before the 
Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock the 
home was in existence. And, again, 
take away the home, and you have a 
tottering skeleton of a government. 
W^e must exalt the home ; we must ele- 
vate and purify the home ; we must 
protect and edify the home. Fill the 
nation with homes ; fill the homes with 
parents, not suffragettes, but mothers ; 
fill the home with children ; fill the 
children with obedience and high as- 
pirations and you will show to the 
world a nation which the world has not 
as yet known. Thus you will produce 
a nation whose glory and power will 
be so great that she will cause other 
nations to sink back into the shadow of 
insignificance. Give us ideal homes 
where fathers are fathers, and mothers 
are mothers, and we will produce 
through the system of the public 
schools and the church, men and schol- 
ars that will startle the world. 

Again we say, gentlemen, the cry- 
ing need of the hour is for men. With 
the words of a noted writer we close: 

"I would like to write over the 
door of every working shop and busi- 
ness house in this land, 'Men wanted.' 
I would place on the wall of eve-y 
school room, college, court of justice, 
and legislative hall, 'Men Wanted.' 
I would wreath in ivory and gold over 
every fire-place, altar and pulpit, 'Men 
Wanted.' I would engrave on the 
mountain side, and have reflected on 
every shimmering wave, and wafted on 
the breezes of heaven, 'Men Wanted.' 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



r would teach the brooklet to sing it; 
women with the forces of nature to 
and write in letters ; of fire and gold 
across the darkened sky, 'Men Want- 
ed.' I would gather the roll of thun- 
der and echo from ocean to ocean, 
'Men Wanted.' I would unite all the 



voices of men, and the pleadings of 
women with the fofrces of nature to 
send one sublime appeal to heaven,— 
'Great and infinite God, at the dawn of 
the twentieth century, give us men, 
clean men, pure men, courageous men 
who desire to do the right because it is 
right.' " 



Give Nature a Chance. 

I. J. Kreider 



Spring has come again and proud 
April in all his trim has put a new 
spirit of youth into everything. And 
before long we may see the green 
foliage back on the trees and we may 
find the woods and valleys bespangled 
with flowers and shrubs. We look at 
these flowers, which, with their voice- 
less lips, are preaching sermons to us, 
and which, as floral apostles, weep in 
dewy splendor without woe, and blush 
without a crime. Their beauty is not 
to be compared. \\'e may behold the 
lily as one of these with its stem erect, 
as it stands in its purity. And then 
among many others we recognize the 
violet, the friendliest of all flowers. 
Besides we see the precious grain fields 
and the forests with their brave old 
trees. As we look at these trees we 
are made to think of the impression 
they made upon Wordsworth when he 
wrote : 
"One imjjulsc from a vernal wood 

May teach you more of man. 
Of moral evil and of good. 

Than all the sages can." 

Now, therefore, if we have eyes that 
see, we cannot help but wonder at the 
marvelous work.s of Nature. Wc can- 



not help but ask ourselves honestly, 
frankly, and fearlessly, what must we 
do to be beautiful, pure, friendly, brave 
and strong? 

At this moment Xature comes along 
and says. Follow me, take me as 
your standard, which is always the 
same, and I will help you to frame 
your judgments; I am unerring and I 
am one clear, unchanged, universal 
light ; I am able to impart life, force, 
and beauty to all and at the same time 
I am the source, the end, and the test 
of art" 

Now in order to follow Xature in 
her various forms, we must know 
something about her. Surely not many 
of us would deem it wise to follow 
some one with whom we are not well 
acquainted. And at the same time one 
to be followed must have characteris- 
tics worthy of imitation, so that in- 
feriors may have some lofty patterns 
toward which to strive. Does Nature 
have these? She certainly has, and has 
them abundantly. Indeed we cannot 
look at any of her specimens without 
being made io wonder why the trees 
and other forms of plant life grow up 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



instead of horizontally, or why leaves 
disappear in the fall and new and more 
beautiful ones return in the spring. 
At length, as we learn the reasons for 
a number of these facts, Nature means 
so much more to us. We thus frame 
new judgments, get new ideas, and 
look at Xature from a different and 
from a broader, as well as from a more 
intellectual, viewpoint. 

Is this because Nature is continually 
changing or does it lie in the fact that 
we are approaching one step closer to- 
ward the Infinite. Nature never 
changes. But the more we learn about 
her the more we enjoy the beauties 
surrounding her. We shall therefore 
never reach the limit in our study of 
Nature, but at the same time we are 
safe in taking her as our standard for 
she will lead us onward to things that 
are higher, nobler, and purer. She is 
perfect. We are far from being per- 
fect, yet let us never become discour- 
aged if we stumble along the way, but 
ever strive toward that which is per- 
fect. In fact, whoever thinks himself 
able to find a faultless person, thinks 
of some one that never was, never is, 
and never shall be, except One. Re- 
member that "to err is human ; to for- 
give, divine." 

Thus we find Nature unerring, un- 
changing, and we look upon her as a 
universal light. She smiles not only 
upon a chosen few but also on all the 
people of all the nations of all the 



world, in fact upon all who are able to 
appreciate her gentle smiles. May we 
have more smiles from God through 
Nature. Oh, that we might realize 
that the more we know about her the 
more her smiles will mean to us, and 
the more and the sweeter would the 
harvests be. 

Then give Nature half a chance and 
notice what she will do for you ; that 
is, if you are capable of joining good 
sense with this good Nature. By giv- 
ing her a chance, we do not mean that 
we are to live, as it were, in the fat age 
of pleasure, wealth, and ease, but be 
true to life and act well our part. 

We must move steadily onward like 
the unchanging sun, which clears and 
improves whatever it shines upon and 
gilds all objects. Thus by walking 
hand in hand with Nature and by keep- 
ing in touch with the laws of Nature, 
we shall surely reap something worth 
while : we shall enjoy life more abun- 
dantly ; we shall be a greater force in 
uplifting humanity ; we shall know 
better how to admire and to propagate 
the good, the noble, the beautiful, and 
the true. This, however, can be done 
only as we look to Nature, the source, 
the end, and the test of Art. Then 
study Nature in her various forms, 
take her as your standard, observe 
carefully the laws of Nature, and you 
will be stronger, not only physically 
and mentally, but also morally. 



What My Life Shall Be. 

Owen Hershey 



Life, that God-given existence, that 
spiritual existence so real, so earnest 
comes but once to me and is no more 
and no less than what I make it. I 
have been given life by my Creator for 
a definite purpose, yet I am but a mist, 
I am a flower and am as fickle and 
unstable as the waters of the mighty 
deep. I came into this life without 
anything and I shall leave it in the 
same state. I cannot understand God 
and his infinite wisdom. 

And now, since my life is uncertain, 
is fickle, and so sinful, and yet so pre- 
cious, shall I not make the most of this 
life. I have been placed here to serve 
man, and by the help of Him who plac- 
ed me here I will do so. I owe and will 
give to every one of my fellow beings 
all the kind words, all the cheerful 
smiles, all the sunshine, all the time, 
and all the strength I can bestow upon 
them. For, by giving these services to 
man I am giving them to God and I 
shall not go unrewarded. 

My highest aim is to benefit man 
whenever and wherever I can. Does 
my brother need it? Ah, yes, we all 
need one another's help, prayers, en- 
couragement, and tears. We are one 
flesh, one blood, and one body. My 



life is my brother's and his life is my 
life, and shall always be so while it 
lasts. My life is full of love,— of love 
for God's handiwork. I owe a rever- 
ence to everything that 1 can see, feel 
or comprehend because it is God's hand 
revolutionizing my life. Wlien I see a 
pure, innocent, little flower or a dear 
little bird, a feeling of love and com- 
passion is aroused in me, and I aid it 
if it is in my power. 

Aly life shall be but a few sorrows, 
a few brief joys spent among God's 
creation. I am here to do a certain 
amount of work, to create a certain 
amount of sorrow, to create a certain 
amount of joy. 

My life, my all I owe to God and 
Him only have I a right to serve, be- 
cause He has power to give life and to 
take it away. I shall pass this way 
but once, and if there is any joy that 
I may t-ive. let me do it now: if there 
is any wound that I may heal, let me do 
it now : if there is any soul that I can 
save, let me do it now. And when the 
battle is won, when the last barrier is 
broken down, I shall stand before the 
judgment bar of God and receive my 
just dues. 



The Limits of Nature. 

A. L. Reber 



The whole world was not intended 
for a single man. Alexander Pope 
says: 
"Nature to all things fixed the limits 

fit, 
And wisely curbed proud man's pre- 
tending wit. 
One science only will one genius fit ; 
So vast is art, so narrow human wit ; 
Not only bounded to peculiar arts, 
But oft in those confined to single 

parts. 
Like kings we lose tlte conquests gain- 
ed before. 
By vain ambition still to make them 

more ; 
Each might his several province well 

command 
Would all but stoop to what they 
understand." 

As a race man is limited by nature, 
both physically and mentally ; individ- 
uals of the race are limited even more 
closely. Man was placed on the earth 
to live, nor is he able to leave this 
I)lanet and live on the moon or on the 
stars; the land was given as his home, 
and so he does not flourish in the sea. 
Divisions of the human race have, 
ages ago, become isolated , by the 
character and climate of the land, and 
in their solitude have lived for cen- 
turies their own particular lives and 
developed characteristics and sciences 
that were impossible for another group 
in another part of the world to develop. 
These people were limited by their en- 
vironment and therefore were limited 
in their attainments, because they de- 
veloped only their particular qualities. 

To speak of man's intellectual limi- 
tations in the days of exploration, dis- 
coverv. research, and communication. 



seems ridiculous. Yet where is the 
mind that has mastered or can master 
all the qualities of all the people, 
places, and objects upon this earth? 
Man's microscopic mind labors a life- 
time to gather a few truths from the 
infinite. 

"When I consider thy heavens, the 
work of thy fingers, the moon and the 
stats,' which thou hast ordained ; what 
is man, that thou art mindful of him?" 

Although all is not for all, neverthe- 
less part is for part. In these days of 
extensive and intensive interests, each 
part demands all the energy and skill 
of the men engaged. At no time has, 
plurality of occupation on the part of 
an individual been very successful. 
The farmer must farm, else he might 
be called away when his grain ought to 
be harvested ; the teacher must teach ; 
the shoemaker make shoes. Under 
such conditions only can true skill de- 
velop, as well as proficiency and 
interest in the work of the 
world. The art and skill of any oc- 
cupation is too wide and difficult to 
receive only secondary attention. If 
you have, a trade, it is required that 
you apply yourself with all your heart, 
with all your might, and with all your 
soul, and in it alone you can profitably 
serve. 

Nature fixes another limit for man 
in giving only one or a few talents to 
a single individual. She may adapt 
one man for the work of a carpenter, 
another for medicine, another for ora- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



torj'. Each of these men in their prop- 
er place can do the best work, live 
the happiest, and be of the greatest ser- 
vice. But if they would interchange 
places they could not be so successful 
nor so happy as before. It is therefore 
necessary that man unearth his talents 
and develop them as he is able. It is 
only then that the highest good can 
be accomplished. If a man feels where 
his talent lies, but thinks talent will 
take care of itself, and then goes beat- 



ing around after some pet ambition, 
for which he is not talented, he be- 
comes like the kings who "lose the 
conquests gained before, by vain am- 
bition still to make them more." No 
man ought to be ashamed of his talent 
however common it may be, for it is 
far more worthy to labor successfully 
in an humble calling than it is to be 
even partially successful in a higher 
profession. "Each might his province 
well command would all but stoop to 
what thev understand." 



The Delights of Man. 

C. J. Rose. 



Man is a being of many dispositions. 
There is not a thing in this world, 
which does not appeal to his different 
natures. That which is not en- 
ticing to one person may be to another. 
This naturally necessitates one to be- 
lieve that men have different aims in 
life. In the life of each person there 
are times when he changes his aim to a 
higher or a lower goal. Then, too, as 
man strives to attain his goal, he has a 
prize or a reward in view. The recom- 
pense to some is fame, honor, and re- 
nown as it is bestowed upon them by 
the world at large : while to others, it 
is service rendered efficiently because 
of education and the spirit of God. 

In the next place, many people have 
their aim in sports as characterized in 
base ball, basket ball, foot ball and 
prize-fighting. Those who participate 
in this kind of recreation and become 
proficient receive worldly fame and 
honor; while those who have the 



"fever" for these sjiorts seemingly have 
no reward. Where sports bring evil 
results, they should not be tolerated. 
Some people can enjoy a good clean 
game of base ball or basket ball and do 
not allow their feelings to run wild ; 
but many can not restrain their inner 
nature and as a result they have an at- 
tack of the "sport fever." Games 
should be indulged in for the sake of 
sport, for then recreation is a means in 
attaining our goal. 

.\nother thing which people prize 
rather highly is money. They spend 
their whole lives in hoarding up riches 
as if they could keep them eternally. 
There is that desire in man to become 
rich financially, whether it is done in a 
legitimate or in an illegal way. Xo one 
can be without money ; but our ener- 
gies need not be directed to the secur- 
ing of it for the sake of being rich. 
There should be a larger purpose in 
view to the person who has this ability. 



OUR COLLEGE TIME? 



13 



Man is only the steward of all which he 
calls his own. In striving for wealth, 
selfish interests should be cast aside. 
For then only will the man who has 
the ability to earn money, use it for the 
uplift of mankind. 

Furthermore, fashions ha\ e been 
deeply rooted into the minds of men 
and women to such an e.xtent that they 
take their greatest delight in them. 
Social and sensual pleasures are the 
results of the fashions, and soon de- 
struction occupies the place of plea- 
sure. Lap-dcgs, hobble-skirts and 
powdered faces are no rare things to 
behold. Ordinances had to be passed 
at some places, regulating the dress of 
woman. The social nature of man is 
never developed legitimately through 
fashions. As long as man tries to de- 
velop his social nature by arousing his 
sensual desire, there is something radi- 
cally wrong. Many people conceive 
the idea that to give or receive pleasure 
means everything but a decent, respect- 
able appearance. True pleasure, how-' 
ever, comes only when one obeys the 
laws of nature in respect to his social 
life. 

Education is the preparation of man 
to adjust himself to any avenue of life 
w^hich he may pursue. The man who 
strives for an education and attains 
this goal has a prize v/orthy of all com 



be compounded with the three subjects 
as discussed heretofore. True educa- 
tion must give to the body, mind, and 
soul all the beauty and perfection they 
are capable of receiving. The man 
who trains himself to be a rascal has 
no education. \\'hy then should not 
man at some stage of his life have the 
aim to secure a worthy education 
which is one of the greatest assets in 
rendering service. 

Service, indeed, is the highest, grand- 
est, and noblest thing which man can 
render. Through it only can the eter- 
nal prize be secured. We need strong 
bodies, we must have our social nature 
developed, we desire pleasure, we want 
an education, but legitimate means 
must be used to secure all these. Paul 
says, "I press on toward the goal unto 
the prize of the high calling of God 
in Christ Jesus." There surely can hot 
be a higher aim for man to attain. 
He must catch the spirit of true ser- 
vice, if he would inherit an eternal 
crown. The source of real joy lies in 
the fact that man will fully surrender 
his life for serving God's highest crea- 
tion. He who lias not a deep convic- 
tion to serve his neighbor will never 
receive the everlasting reward which 
is so freely offered him. Shall not man 
then strive earnestly to give back to 



mendation. In fact education connot God what he has received from Him^ 



Building On Foundation. 

Harvey K. Geyer 



There are many people who start out 
in life too soon ; they are not sure of 
starting right. They do not think of 
the future welfare and conditions, but 
start out with no definite purpose or 
aim, and are therefore building on no 
good foundation. As a result the}- soon 
fall and disaster comes. It is not he 
who can rise highest in the shortest 
time ; it is not he who is done tirst, but 
he who can work best, and who is 
working patiently and lovingly in ac- 
cordance with the designs of God. 

The first thing we need in building a 
right foundation is divine help and 
guidance. This is one reason why so 
many people do not build right founda- 
tions. They often want to build their 
own foundation so quickh' and selfish- 
ly, that they do not think of divine help 
and guidance. It may appear for a time 
that they have built on a right founda- 
tion, but in real test and competition 
they find that they have built a foun- 
dation too quickly and too selfishly. 

Next we should consider our voca- 
tion. There are many vocations, from 
which to select. We should be sure of 
one and then prepare for that one. We 
should not try all of them and not be 
prepared for any. If we have one se- 
lected, we should prepare and make 
that one a success. We can do this by 
selecting the proper education we 
ought to have for that certain vocation. 
And while in school we should not 
try to do our work the quickest way 
and for the sake of deriving praise 
from f)ur teachers and fellow students, 
but do the work in such a way that our 
fellow students, as well as ourselves 
may be benefited. What good will 
high marks and praise from the teach- 
ers bring you in after life, if you simply 
aim for high marks and praise. The 



thing that counts is the way you get 
the knowledge and the way you re- 
member and use it afterwards. It 
must remain with you, and be at your 
command at any time you need it. 
That is laying a right foundation. 

Laying a good foundation is also es- 
sential to making a home. Our divorce 
courts would not be doing the business 
they do. if young ])eople would be sure 
they are laying the right foundation 
in choosing their companions. In the 
present age young people do not, it 
seems, stop to consider the future. 

They often are married with no 
thought of the future. They do not 
think what is before them. They do 
not think of the happiness they should 
enjoy. But they just think of their 
present happiness. 

Many a young man and young lady 
ha^•e been wronged because they did 
not think and consider well the laying 
of a right foundation for a married life. 
Thej' even sometimes do not know 
anything about each other. Is it any 
winder we have homicides, suicides, 
andniurders in h'unes. Why do we as 
a Christian nation have jails, alms- 
houses, penitentiaries, reformatories, 
asylums, and homes for childre;i that 
have been ]jicked up off the street, who 
do not kn(!w who their father and 
mother is? Tracing it all back we fin€ 
it all lies in not laying a right founda- 
tion. 

( hir liusiness i- not to build anickly. 
but to l)uilil u]ion a right foundation 
in a right way and spirit. Life is more 
than a mere competition between man 
and man ; it is not who can be done 
first, but who can work best. "The 
greatest man is he who chooses the 
right with invincible resolution. 



^ ■■ "* fl 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, Editor-in-Chief 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 



.School Nbtes 



Mary G. Hershey... 
Robert J. Ziegler 

Nora L. Reber Homerl^n News 

Naomi Longenecker K. L. S. News 



J. D. Reber Alumni Notes 

Isaac J. Kreider Bxcnanges 

J. H. Gingrich Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider Art Editor 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year by Elizabethtown 

College. 
This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their files, 

and arrearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates: — Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for 12.00. 
Entered 51s second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Ellzabethtovm Postoffice. 



Be a Sun-dial 

There is an inscription found on 
many sun-dials, which reads as fol- 
lows : Horas non numero nisi serenas, 
"I count only the sunny hours." This 
is an interesting statement and implies 
that many hours are passed by that are 
not counted. Man has devised other 
means of knowing not only the time of 
the day but also of the night, inven- 
tions without which the civilized 
world could not progress. The mod- 
ern watch is a delicate piece of ma- 
chinery and is one of the most accu- 



rate inventions we possess. The aver- 
age clock was at one time a luxury en- 
joyed by few people. The grand- 
father's clock slowly ticking away the 
seconds for the lovers of former gene- 
rations is quite a contrast to the 
modern parlor clock suggesting to lov- 
ers of to-day the "get-together, get- 
together" policy. 

Prior to the time of the grand- 
father's clock a valuable asset to manv 
a family,— and to many a preacher, — 
was the old fashioned hour glass. This 
device served a useful purpose in 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



marking a definite length of time. 
More primitive man judged the time of 
the day and the night by gazing at the 
sun and the other heavenly bodies. 
This naturally led to the association of 
shadows cast by the sun. Then some 
ingenious person contrived the use of 
a gnomon whose shadow marked the 
time on a dial placed arciind it. This 
formed the sun-dial in use in early 
Grecian times. And, as it marked the 
hours only when the si'U was shining, 
it soon received the motto: Hnras 
non numero nisi serenas. 

This is decidedly a lesson on opti- 
mism. Some one has said, 

"The optimist and the pessimist, 

The difference 'is rather droll ; 

The one sees the dough-nut, 

The other sees the hole." 
This, too, is a true talc, but not nearly 
so significant as the precious Latin 
motto. There are so many unfortu- 
nate people existing toPday who might 
just as well be happy. The secret lies 
in counting only the sunny hours. 
And how often we see men grumbling 
and complaining when the weather 
does not suit him ! Oh, that he might 
learn with the poet, James Whitcomb 
Riley : 

"It hain't no use to grumble and 
complain; 

[fs jest as cheap and easy to rejoice. 

When God sorts out the weather 
and sends rain, 

Why rain's my choice." 

It really is a sin to worry. Why? 
Because it shows a lack of trust in the 
omniscience of God, \Yho knows what 
is best for the human family. It is 
finding fault with the acts of Him in 
whom we live and move and have our 
being. But it is nevertheless true 
that misfortunes will sometimes befall 



us, — misfortunes in our judgment. 
Then is the time that we should look 
on the bright side and be a sun-dial. 
counting only the sunny hours. 

To a student a hard problem may 
present itself. Should he then give up 
in despair or go to .some fellow student 
or teacher to have it solved for him? 
No, he must tug away at it himself if 
he is to become strong. A hard prob- 
lem is excellent food for the mind. 
Too many students feed on too high a 
diet. And then there are many who 
eat too much that is not good food for 
the mind. The easy problem, the 
modern novel, the modern play, and 
some magazines may make pleasant 
eating but they are poor food and af- 
ford little nourishment. So do not be- 
come discouraged with your problem 
that is difficult. Tug away through 
the cloud, then be a sun-dial counting 
only the sunny hours. 

When you leave school and reach 
your homes do not complain about the 
work there is to be done. Do not find 
fault with your brothers, parents, or 
neighbors because your views diflrer. 
Forget your diflferences, be of service 
to your community. Be a sun-dial 
counting only the sunny hours. 

The public schools need optimistic 
young men and women as teachers. A 
school with a pessimist as a teacher is 
not a school in reality. A pessimist 
can not inspire to deeds of honor and 
service, and so his pupils become 
gloomy and get entirely out of tune 
with nature. Not sc> with the opti- 
mist. He brings cheer into the hearts 
of his pupils and gives them inspira- 
tion and is himself a person to whom 
his pupils may aspire. As you go into 
a school room lay aside all frowns and 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



put on a shining face if it is not natural 
with you ; be a sun-dial counting only 
the sunny hours. 

Reform movements also need the 
man and the woman with an optimistic 
mind. The temperance cause which 
is making such stately strides has 
many reverses to face but the glimmer 
of hope is shining with the silvery 
splendor of the moonlight and will 
soon come forth in the golden beams 
of the "all-beholding sun." The "red 
light" crusade needs men of courage 
and optimism to prove to the country 
that the social evil is not a necessity. 
The Lord is on the side of right and 
will prosper these mighty reform 



movements in spite of much opposi- 
tion. Be a sun-dial counting only the 
sunny hours. 

In conclusion, we desire to call the 
attention of every Christian to the 
fact that his personal life is what goes 
to make the Church of the Lord. The 
Christian ought to be the happiest per- 
son in the world, and it is important 
that his life should cast the proper 
shadow on the dial of his influence. 
His life is always in the face of the 
"sun of righteousness" and may con- 
stantly be counting sunny hours in 
his lifetime. May we learn to keep 
our perplexities and trials to our- 
selves and be a sun-dial counting only 
the sunny hours. 





Spake full well, in languag'e quaint and 
olden, 
One who dwelleth by the castled 
Rhine, 
When he called the flowers s i blue 
and golden. 
Stars that in earth's firmament do 
shine. 

We all know how black, how dark, 
how utterly without beauty is the sky 
on a cloudy night when there are no 
stars visible. So this earth would be, 
were it not dotted here and there with 
the beautiful stars of nature, the flow- 
ers. What a monotonous old sphere 
this would be were it not for the flow- 
ers. Flowers that cheer us and fill us 
with thou.gh^s of beauty, purity and 

love. The flowers are ever our bright 
and happy companions lifting their 
smiling faces to us and imparting to 
us messages of cheerfulness. 

The trailing arbutus signifying 
modesty as it hides among the leaves, 
shrinking as it were fnm .showing it- 
self; the delicate little hepatica indica- 
ting weakness or frailty ; the violets, 
showing their purple faces to the sun 
and hinting at truthfulness, — all are 
interestint.', and so we might .go on 



naming one after another and drawing' 
lessons from their very natures. 

This is the month of flowers. Let 
us gather all the enjoyment from them 
that we possibly can. Already we see 
the students wearing small bouquets 
of flowers and the botany class is be- 
ginning to search for specimens. Let 
us seize every opportunity we can to 
gather them. But let us be consider- 
ate of the life of the plants and not 
tear them up recklessly. * 

On April 4, Miss Elizabeth Myer 
and Miss Elizabeth Kline visited Mr. 
and Mrs. Glasmire at Palmyra. 

On Sunday. April 5, Prof. Schlosser 
and his family visited at the same 
place. Professt)r 'Schlosser preached 
at Palmyra the same day. 

Mr. John Fred Graham says that he 
enjoyed the last lecture 'immensely. 
Mr. Graham has been so unfortunate 
as not to have appeared in print thu.s 
far this year and we would call your 
attention to him. Mr. Graham is our 
general handy man around the place, 
actin<j as sub'stitute base ball umpire, 
nflficial basket ball scorer, etc., etc. 

Profes.sor Schlosser addres.sed the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



graduates at the Grammar ScIk ol 
Commencemi^nt at Schoeneck on Tues- 
day evening, April 7. 

The Society Anniversary exercises 
were a grand success. All those who 
took part in the program deserve 
much credit. The following program 
was rendered : 

Invocation ; D. C. Reher 

Music. 

President's Address ....C. L. Martin 

Oration — National Consciousness in 

Education Jacob E. Myers 

Ursinus College. Collegeville, Pa. 
Music. 

Recitation— The Death Bed of Bene- 
dict .\rnnld Ruth Coble 

Address — \Miat is a Man Worth? 

• Dr. Charles H. Gordinier, 
M. S. N. S., Millersville. Pa. 
r^Iusic. 

The address by Dr. Gordinier was 
well wiirth hearing. Dr. Gordinier 
said. "A man's worth depends upon 
his life. His life depends upon four 
things, viz.. Love, Ideals, Friendship, 
and Example. Love that is broad is 
the love that counts in life. We must 
have ideals for recreation as well as 
ideals for work. .\ man's best friend 
or his worst enemy is himself." 

"I don't suppose you evah have 
Jieavy fogs ovah heah do you?" said 
the young dude from London. "You 
know ovah in owah sity we have 
heavy fogs." 

"Waall not so very." said the fish- 
erman from Maine. "You see ithat 
■"air barn over there on the hill? Waall 
last summer I was a puttin' on shin- 
gles on that barn when a fog settled 
over the bay. I jest kept on shinglin' 
until I thought I had used about 
enough shingles fer the thing. Jest as 



I went to come down, the fog it lifted 
and I fell down in the middle of the 
harbor.' Here I had went and shin- 
gled a hundred yards of that 'air fog." 
Professor ileyer preached an Easter 
sermon in Shamokin on April 12. 

Professor Harley spent Easter with 
Mr. Kreider in Lebanon. 

Question: "X^'hy does Mr. Kreider 
tak-e such an interest in art lately? 
There's a reason." 

The impersonation by John F. 
Chambers was enjoyed by all. Mr. 
Chambers is a man of talent and gave 
us a pleasant evening. His subject 
was "A Grand Army Alan." 

Miss Hiestand: "Miss Shisler, did 
you get that problem about the Centi- 
pede (Centigrade) thermometer?" 

Miss Shimp: (With reference to the 
birdfoot violet) "Oh ! that's the dog- 
foot violet." 

One o'clock Saturday afternoon, 
April 18, found a merry party on the 
way for arbutus. The pilgrims trav- 
eled on merrily until they came to the 
arbutus ground. Then the party scat- 
tered here and there among the trees 
searching for the fragrant blossoms. 
Their search was rewarded by 
a plentiful supply of flowers. After 
searching for about an hour and a half 
all began to think of returning home. 
Here and there were groups posing in 
various positions for the benefit of 
amateur photographers who were busy 
presumably in focusing and in various 
other duties connected with the art. 
After another long tramp all arrived 
at the College a happy party. 

The tennis courts are again begin- 
ning to show signs of life. 
On Tuesday evening, .April 14, about 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



a dozen of our students attended the 
cantata "Elijah," rendered by the Har- 
risburg Choral Society at Harrisburg. 
Many are the typographical errors 
occurring in print, but one of the 
strangest appeared in a southern pa- 
per recently. In one column the fol- 
lowing appeared : 

The Condor of the Andes 
Albert Seaton Berg of Kentucky 

Bears that Distinction. 
In another column on the same page 
this heading blazed forth : 

The Tallest Man in Congress 
Soars far above the Eagle 
And Reaches a Height of Six Miles 
Professor Meyer's daughter, Mil- 
dred, has whooping cough. 

On Sunday evening, April 19, one of 
our former students, Mr. Levi K. Zieg- 
ler of Lancaster, preached in the Col- 
lege Chapel for us. 

Wenger's Favorite Rebus 
2 Y's U R, 
2 Y's U B, 

1 C U R, 

2 Y's 4 Me. 
Student in Literature Examination : 

"The Colonists wrote few books be- 
cause their thoughts were facts and 
could not be stated." 

Another: "Jonathan Edwards' work 
is so very deep that many people do 
not understand him, but otherwise he 
is widely read." 

Still another: "Michael Wiggles- 
worth's 'Day of Doom' reminds me of 
the first Jack-o'-lantern I ever saw." 

The Summer Term 

The seventh annual summer term 
at Elizabethtown College opens July 



6, to continue six weeks. 
Object. 
The summer term affords unexcelled 
opportunities to teachers in the public 
schools who aim to prepare for college 
and to high school teachers who aim 
to finish the regular college course. 
Others who desire to take a thorough 
review in the common school branches 
or who desire to take advanced stand- 
ing in their courses in Elizabethtown 
College may also be accommodated. 
Instruction. 

Each student devotes all his time to 
three studies of secondary grade or U> 
two studies of college grade, and can 
accomplish from one-third to one-half 
year's work in these studies. The rec- 
itations are daily and cne hour in 
length. All work satisfactorily com- 
pleted will count towards the comple- 
tion of a course of study. 
Expenses. 

In all studies below the regular 
college course the tuition is ten dollars 
for three studies. In college studies 
the tuition is fifteen dollars, payable at 
the middle of the term. Text books 
may be rented or purchased at the Col- 
lege book room. Boarding and room 
rent in the college buildings will be 
at catalogue rates. 

Additional Advantages. 

The tennis court, gymnasium, libra- 
ry, and reading room will be accessible 
to the summer term students free of 
charge. Inasmuch as the classes are 
usually very small, the instruction will 
be adapted to the needs of the indivi- 
dual student and hence the summer 
term offers advantages incomparable 
to anv other term. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



For further information apply to the 
President. Those interested should 
make their wants known early so that 
necessary arrangements can be made. 

o — - 

K. L. S. Notes. 

On March 27, the Society met in 
Literary Session. The program ren- 
dered was opened with a song by the 
society. Ephraim Meyer then recited 
"The Water Fowl," after which Laban 
Wenger gave an interesting speech on 
the part that Maximilian played in 
Mexican History. A very interesting 
feature of this program was an infor- 
mation class conducted by Professor 
Harley. The questions were interest- 
ing and the class very intelligent. 
Miss Mary Elizabeth Miller then gave 
in her skilful way a piano solo entitled 
"Silver .Spring." The program was 
closed by the reading of the Literary 
Echo by Owen Hershey. 

The following constitute the officers 
for the coming administration : Presi- 
dent, Ruth Landis ; Vice President, 
John Kuhns ; Secretary, Anna Gish ; 
Critic, Mary Elizabeth Miller; Editor, 
A. M. Falkenstein ; Treasurer, Anna 
Cassel ; Chorister, Paul Engle ; Report- 
er, Elizabeth R. IMiller; and Recorder, 
Ira Herr. 

Homerian Ntws. 

The last public program was consid- 
ered very good. The first feature was 
a vocal duet "Just a Song at Twilight," 
sung by Katherine Miller and Nora 
Reber. The address on Socialism by 
J. D. Reber was treated in a broad 
way. It showed preparation and logi- 
cal arrangement. KatherineMiller re- 
cited two selections, "Lochinvar" and 



"The Village Preacher." They were 
delivered so that the hearers caught 
the spirit and meaning of the selec- 
tions. The audience seemed interest- 
ed to the end. Elizabeth Kline sang a 
vocal solo, "They Have Taken Away 
My Lord." It was efficiently render- 
ed. Mr. H. H. Nye's paper on "The 
World's Legal Tender," showed much 
thought. The good thoughts that were 
presented were original. The instru- 
mental music was furnished by Mary 
E. Miller, who played a selection en- 
titled "The Palms." The speaker, I. 
Z. Hackman then gave an address on 
Loyalty. 

Athletics 

In recent exchanges received, the ex- 
change editors criticised our paper for 
not having an athletic department. In 
so doing they had an absolute right. 

The editors of school notes of pre- 
vious years were accustomed to place 
athletic news with other news. There 
has, however, been a slight change 
this year, for hardly any sports have 
been placed in our paper. 

This does not mean that our school 
has no place for athletics, because 
such is not the case. We believe in 
athletics to such an extent that they 
are secondary to intellectual training. 
Our school has not been founded with 
.he prime object of making profession- 
al athletes of any kind. We believe 
in sports for the sake of sport and for 
(he development of the physical body. 
Although there are some peoole ,who 
can not see the necessity of sports or 
any other form of recreation, never- 
theless, it must be admitted that a 
student would do injustice to himself 
otherwise. 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



The basket ball season closed about 
one month ago. The games played 
during the year were all very interest- 
ing and exciting. The girls appeared 
oftener on the scene of actioti than any 
previous time. Some of their games 
were better than those played by the 
boys. Much praise is due Miss Ruth 
Landis for her untiring efforts to get 
the girls to play. We trust they will, 
keep their zeal for basket ball until an- 
other school year opens. 

Since April has come with its some- 
what warmer weather, the boys have 
taken ad\-antage of it by playing base- 
ball and tennis. The line-up of the 
teams in base ball is as follows : 

Herrites Geyerites. 

Rose, 2b Reber, ib 

Kreider, ib Sheetz, 2b 

Miller, 3b Geyer, c 

Hershey, p Musselman, p 

Herr, c Engle, 3b 

Hertzler, If Falkenstein, ss 

Wise, cf Royer, cf 

Meyer, ss Becker, rf 

\\'enger, rf Zug, If 

Last Friday evening April 17, the 
Geyerites won by the score of 17 to 9. 
Some stages of the game were very in- 
teresting. Most of our undeveloped 
talent have made some improvement. 
We expect to be in finer fettle until 
May. 

On Ai)ril 16 a meeting of the tennis 
association was called and the follow- 
ing officers were elected for a term of 
one year; President, H. K. Geyer; 
Vice-President, Paul Engle; Treasur- 
er, R. E. Zug; and Secretary, Ryntha 
Shelly. The tennis courts are not yet 
all in a condition to be used. We 



trust our new President will busy him- 
self, because there will soon be a great 
demand for the use of the courts. We 
also hope there will be a tennis tour- 
nament. May we all strive for a suc- 
cessful season in base ball and tennis. 

The Arbor Day program rendered 
by the Senior Class on Friday after- 
noon, April 24, was a credit to the 
fclass. Professor Ober delivered the 
address on this occasion. It was full 
of instruction and inspiration. The 
class i)lanted a linden tree in front of 
the cottage on the College Campus. 
Moisic Program 

The Musical Department of Eliza- 
liethtovvn College will give the last 
number of the lecture course on 
Thursday evening, May 7. The Music 
Department is hard at work in the 
preparation of an excellent program 
consisting of vocal and instrumental 
selections. We hope that many of 
our friends will arrange to be with us 
on this night. This program will be 
rendered in the Market House Hall in 
town. 

The program given by the College 
Temperance League on Thursday 
evening in the College Chapel was 
helpful and inspiring. Mr. Capetanios 
in thundering tones placed the re- 
sponsibility for this curse upon the 
nation at large and vividly portrayed 
the attitude of the Christian toward 
the traffic. Miss Amanda Landis of 
Millersville. addressed the meeting. 
She forcefully portrayed the iniquitous 
curse to us and vividly presented the 
picture of the closing of a saloon. 
She closed by giving us the bright 
outlook of the temperance cause. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



Resolutions of Sympathy. 

Whereas, The Death Angel has 
again entered one of our homes and 
called to his reward Mr. Harrison S. 
Ober, brother of our beloved teacher 
and co-worker. Professor H. K. Ober, 
be it 

Resolved, That we, the Faculty and 
the Students of Elizabethtown College 
express our deepest sympathy to Pro- 
fessor Ober, the immediate family, and 
to the relatives of the bereaved. 

Resolved, That we commend these 
sorrowing friends to the care of our 



I leavenly Father who can heal the 
broken-hearted anrl comfort the trou- 
bled soul. 

Resolved. That a copy of these reso- 
lutions be sent to Professor Ober, and 
to the bereaved family, and that they 
be published in The Elizabethtown 
Herald. The Elizabethtown Chronicle, 
Our College Times, and The Lititz 
Express. 

Elizabeth Myer 
Garfield Shearer 
Ruth R. Landis 

Committee. 




Alumni News 

The joint anniversary of the Key- 
stone and Homerian Literary Socie- 
ties on the loth of April brought many 
of the akimni back to the doors of our 
Alma Mater. Jacob Myers, 'ii, de- 
livered an excellent oration on 
"National Consciousness in Educa- 
tion." Mr. Myers is finishing his col- 
lege course this year at Ursinus Col- 
lege. C. L. Martin, '12, served as 
president at this meeting. 

In a former issue we reported that 
Harry Longenecker, '11, was teaching. 
We were misinformed as to Mr. Long- 
enecker's whereabouts. We now wish 
to report that he entered the Sopho- 
more Class at State College last fall. 
Mr. Longenecker also attended the an- 
niversary of the Literary Societies. 
Among the others who attended this 
meeting are: B. F. Waltz, '10, L. W. 
Leiter, '09, and Andrew Hollinger, '10, 
and wife. 

Jacob Z. Herr, for some time book- 
keeper for the Martin & Heagy Man- 
ufacturing Company, is now a travel- 
ing salesman for that company. 

H. K. Carman, '05. is a clerk in the 
Philadelphia post office. 

Enoch Madeira, '08, is about to leave 
for Ottawa, Canada, where he will be 



an assistant teacher in an apiary 
school. 

Abel Madeira, "09, is keeping books 
at the Greider Poultry Farms at 
Rheems. Pa. 

Amos Geib, '09, was lately advanced 
to the eldership and will soon assume 
his duties as pastor of the Brooklyn 
church. 

Walter Eshelman, "12, has returned 
to school in view of further prepara- 
tion. 

B. Mary Royer, '07, who lately sailed 
as a missionary to India, is now on the 
field. She enjoys her work, but finds 
some difficulty in learning the lan- 
guage. 

Olive A. Myers. '10. has changed 
her address from Golden, Colorado, to 
Clifton Training School, Denver, Col- 
orado. Miss Myers is there as a chap- 
eron for the girls. 

Edgar G. Diehm, '13, added another 
laurel to his fame as an orator. At 
the Oratorical Contest of the Pennsyl- 
vania Arbitration and Peace Society 
held at Bucknell University on Friday 
evening, .\pril 17, he won the second 
prize of twenty-five dollars. There 
were six contestants from different 
Colleges and Universities in Pennsyl- 
vania. We rejoice in Mr. Diehms 
success. 




Exchange Notes 

Oak Leaves for ^larch is interesting 
and timely throughout. It is filled with 
up-to-date articles. "Madame Montes- 
sori and her W'ork," is educative and 
should fill all its readers with a pro- 
gressive spirit in the present day meth- 
ods of teaching. " Modern Plant 
Breeding" should be read by all as it 
puts one in touch with rnodern experi- 
mental work in plant life and may at 
^the same time stimulate the much 
needed agricultural interests. The 
Chapel Talk by V. F. Schwalm, on 
"Rome's Problems, Our Own" brings 
a person face to face with modern 
American conditions. Your cover is 
very attractive. Contents are well ar- 
ranged. Some few things that might 
Improve your excellent jiaper are : a 
more lengthy editorial, a few jokes, an 
exchange department, an arranged 
table of contents, poems, and society 
news. 

The Ursinus Weekly brings out 
very nicely the college activities. 

The Yucca hails to us from Tucum- 
cari, X. M. Your short stories are 



entertaining. The Editorial contains a 
vahiable thought that Common Sense 
is slowly conquering Custom. 

A very versatile magazine known as 
"The Tech Tatler" is a welcomed guest 
among our exchanges. A few more 
literary articles or short stories added 
*o the 'instructive one of General Rob- 
ert E, Lee would strengthen your lit- 
erary department. W(e think that six 
pages allotted to athletics and only a 
few to the literary department is some- 
what out of proportion. 

The Carlisle Arrow. Read the ad- 
dress by Mr. Parker, also read the 
splendid thoughts brought out in the 
notes from the commencement ad- 
dresses. It w^ill do you much good. 
Your paper covers a wide scope and 
is educative throughout. 

The Spice taken as a whole is a very 
interesting High School paper. 

The April number of the Sunburian 
High deserves credit. Give us some 
mcire lengthy stories. , 

Mica, mica, parva Stella ; 
Miror, quaenam sis tarn bella ! 
Splendens eminus in illo, 
Alba velut gemma, caelo. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



e BEE HIVE STORE 



For 

DRY GOODS 

and 
NOTIONS 

RAIN COATS 

and 
UMBRELLAS 



Shoes, Etc 
"Something New Every Day 




SWEATERS 
UNDERWEAR 
HOSIERY 
NECKWEAR 

and 
FANCY 

GOODS 

A. A. ABELE, EHzabethtown, Pa. 



CONDUCTED ON SANITARY PRIN- 
CIPLES IS THE 

RALPH CROSS 

Shaving Parlor 

Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. 
None Better. Few as Good. 

D. H BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN 

The baker who knows how. Phone or drop 

a postal. 

BISHOP'S STUi^aO 

PHOTOS OF ALL STYLES 

FRAMING NEATLY EXECUTED 
Kodaks and Films for sale. Amateur 
Finishing Solicited. Work Guaranteed. 

Centre Square. 



The Pratt 
Teachers' Agency 

70 Fifth Avenue 
New York 

Receives calls at all season^ for col- 
lege and normal graduates, specialists 
and other teachers in co leses, public 
and private schools in all parts of ttie 
country. 

Advises parents cbout schools. 

WM. O. PRATT, Manager. 

Plain Suits Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats 

CANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor. N. Queen and Orange Sts. 
LANCASTER, PA. 



LEO KOB ' 
Heating and 

Plumbing 

ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



Kodaks and Supplies Athletic Goods 

Kodaks and supplies of all kinds al- 
ways on hand in the famous Eastman 
quality. Don't forget us when In need 
of supplies for in or out door sports. 

HARRY K. DORSHEIMER 

Exclusive agency for Hopewell Choc- 
olate Dainties. 



School Supplies. 



Cutlery 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



27 



iG.Wm.REISNERl 

I Manufacturing | 

i Jeweler | 

= College Jewelry of the Better Sort. ■ 

m Class Pins and Rings, Prize Cups, Fra- § 

B ternity Jewelry, Medals. | 

I Watches Diamonds Jewelry = 

B 120 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 1 



ai-iii 



CENTRAL 
MEAT MARKET 



Franklin and Marshall 
College, Lancaster, Pa. 

LANCASTER, PA, 
Offers liberal courses in 

ARTS and SCIENCES. 

Campus of fifty-four acres with ten 

buildings including Gymnasium and 

complete Athletic Field. 

For catalogue apply to 

HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAN 



All Kinds of Choice 

Fresh and Smoked Meats. 

H. GOOD. Elizabeth town, 



Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 



W,E DO IT RIGHT 



Shoe Repairing 



F. D. GROFF & BRO, 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



S. K. BARNES & SON 



; F. T. MUTH 



H. M. MUTH 



MUTH BROS- 

Dealers in i 

iLUMBERoi 

Also all kinds of building material 
and mill work, Slate and Cement, 
Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent 
Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board.etc. 
COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 

We aim to give you a square deal 
that will merit your trade and friend- 
ship. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Carry 
This Pen 
Upside Down , 



Boys: cany the Parker Jack Knite 
Pen m your trousers pocket along 
wi;h your keys. 

Girls :_ carry it in tSe pocket of 
your white blouse. 

Play foclball with it.— backelball. 
tennis, hockey. It's on the job the 
minute you want to WTite.^ without 
leaving a pinhead spot of ink any- 



acrosspaperl That's the way it writes. 

Price $2.50 up. Get one on trial. 

Take it back any time witlim 10 

days if you're not tickled to death 



PARKER 

Jack Knife Safety 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

Seven Reasons : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 



Elizabethtown College 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



D. H. MARTIN 

«?eady-Mlade Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes and Notions 

North East Corner Centre Square, ELIZA 3ETHTOWN, PA. 



JACOB HSHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Centre Square, Blizabethtown, Pa. 
With you for 35 years. THAT'S ALL 



♦ ♦■ H ' »il ''>- l"l -*- H"l"H '* <"l"> *- l '******- l"l ' 



Lehman & Wolgemuth I 
COAL I 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR % 

Telephone a 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENN'A % 

FURNITURE 

F. C. FISKER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'A 



I 



Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 

W. R. Ashenfelter 

CHOICE BREAD AND 
CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at Short Notice. 

S. Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING. 

Rubter beels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

URSINUS COLLEGE, Collegevllle, Pa7 

(24 miles from Philadelphia) 
Group system of instruction. University 
trained faculty. High standards of scholar- 
ship. Athletics encouraged but controlled. 
No fraternites or exclusive clubs. Strong 
Christian influences. New dormitories and 
dining halls. Men and women admitted to 
all courses. 

SUMMER SESSION 
Oldest and most inviting college summer 
school in Pennsylvania. College courses 
and preparatory studies. Teaching by heads 
of departments. Large shaded campus and 
cool buildings. Terms low. 
GEORGE LESLIE OMWAKE, Pd.D., Pres. 



ELIZABETHTOWN DENTAL PARLORS 

Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday. 
S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 
We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 

Y. M. C. A. BIdg., LANCASTER, PA. 

iaiiiHiiiiaiiiiiaiiiiJBiuiiB:!!:iBniinm:::xiiiiB ■!!::w'»iBiu::s? 

Ih. H. BRANDT I 

1 I 

g Dealer in | 

I ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL | 
I SLATE and ROOFING PAPER ■ 



I ELIZABETHTOWN, PENN'A e 

M:;!a!!';ia:'''!V«:»:iD'llllli:sa''!a'!!!«''<!K''9:«W'!ll!'!!!K 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Jfour Patronage. 



W ELIZABEThTOWN HERALD 

$1.00 A YEAR 
Estimateson any kind of Job Printing. Linotyping for the Tirade. 



J. i Nl . W L, VV JtLi i-.JILI\. J I Cards, and hundreds of. articles for your 



CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



The place to buy 
Stationery, Pennants, Souvenir Goods, Post 



pleasure and convenience. Our candies are- 
always fresh. LAWRY'S VARIETY STORE^^ 
Half Block S. of Center Sq., Elizabethtown^ 

; I Boggs Hardware Store 

The best there is in hardware at the- 
loWest possible prices. Prompt and cour- 
; teous service. TRY US. 



DEG\3TIST 

GEO. K. KERSEY 
Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

A. wTcaiInP 

store Adjoining Federal Room 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - - - PENN'A 



JOHN A. FISHER 

BARBER 

Centre Square, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

piiiiiHiiBiiii:ai<':iniiiiBii»aiitt;aiiiiHiiiiiBiiinBiii:ai!ii!B'.'iBiiiiin 

I JOS. H. RIDER & SON f 

e AGENCY FOR | 

■ i 

i SPALDING'S I 

i ■ 

I Baseballi Tennis Goods I 

■ ■ 

'■iiiiaiiiaiiiiiBiiuBiiiaiiiiaiiiiiaii. 



D. B, KLINE 

CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 




ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Beet Grades of 

FIX>UR AND FEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for «rain. 

hay and straw 

EIJZ-\BETHTOWN. - PEN?I.\. 



Mention Otir College Times When Writing. 



31 



I The Book Store i 

I I 

1 BOOKS, BIBLES. SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPPLIES | 

1 MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED I 

'i I 

I G N. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown, Pa. f 



t*** * ** * *^f**** * * *^* ' i* * * ****** 




Seven thousand people buy WALK- 
OVER shoes every day— certainly 
there must be much merit in a shoe 
to attain such popularity — 
In addition to the better quality ot 
our shoes we offer our better man- 
ner of serving you. 

WALK-OVER ^ 

SHOE STORE % 

HUNTZBERGER- WINTERS CO. ♦ 

Department Store % 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'A |l 



MIE5S£'S ICE CREAM 

adds ZEST to the MEAL 

Sold in Elizabethtown by 

J. S. GROSS. 

IPaintino a^^ (Paper 

IbaiiGing 

AMOS B. DRACE 

Spalding Sporting Goods I 

Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, X 
Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic "^ 
Shoes. Kodaks and Cameras, de- ♦ 
veloping and finishing. i 

H . B. HE R R $ 

30-32 West King Street 1 

LANCASTER, PA. 2 



mm» mt \¥m 



tm 



tima0m0kimtmt w m t m mn m 



Est. 1884 Est. 1884 

KIRR JOHNSON CS, CO. 

Pianos. Player-Pianos, Victrolas, Sheet Music, Musical Mdse. 
16-18 W. King Street. LANCASTER, PA. 



32 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Elizabethtown Exchange 
Bank 



Transacts a general banking business. 

Pays interest on time deposits. 

Solicits your patronage. 

OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President. ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice. Pres. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 









Dl RECTORS 








A. G. Heisey 






Jos. G. Heisey 






J. H. Buch 


Allen A. Coble 






Dr. H. K. Blough 






Dr. A. M. Kalbach 


H. J. Gish 






Henry E. Landis 






Geo. D. Boggs 




E. 


E. 


Hernley 


B. 


H 


Greider 



TAKE YOUR 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morn- 
ing. Returns Wednesday & Friday afternoon 


X 1 

; D. G. BRINSER 

\ f% 1 Grain, Flour, Feed, < 
> l.llQI Seeds, Hay, Straw < 
; UUdI andF;rtilizer. 

! Bell & Ind. Phones 

' Rheems, - - Pa. J 


Ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 
Catalogues a Specialty 

311 W. Grant St., LANCASTER, PA. 



IIIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIIBIUIiailllll 



O. N. HEISEY 
Provisions, Groceries and Choice Candles 



HEISEY BUILDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




O^'^fA/;. 



The Answered Prayer 5 

Sic Semper Tyrannis " | 7 

Rivalry of Romanticism in the 19th Century... 

The Girl of To-Day 10 

The Renaissance 1 1 

Editorial 1 4 

A Good School Paper '4 

School Notes '9 

Homerian Society 22 

K. L. S. Notes 23 

Athletics 23 

Resolutions of Sympathy 18 

Alumni ■ 24 

Exchanges 25 




Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 

HERTZLER'S 
Department Store 

Your needs supplied at satisfactory 
prices in Dry Goods, Grocenes, Ready- 
to-Wear Clothing for Men and Women 
of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Floor Oil- 
cloth, Shoes, etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
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Eliza BiCTHTOWN, Pa , June, 1914 



The Answered Prayer. 



Ella S. Hiestand. 



"I must iiave Ethel and you. Ethel 
needs the care of a mother and now 
that duty will fall on you, John. My 
prayer is that she may grow up to be 
a noble and useful woman," said Airs. 
Collins t < her husband on her death- 
bed. Then turning to Ethel she said, 
"Ethel, be a good girl and love your 
father, cimfnrt him when lonely, and 
never fursake him nor neglect him in 
old age." 

After speaking these words she 
passed away. Mr. Collins and Ethel 
were very lonely after her departure 
as they had no relatives living near to 
comfort them. For just twelve years 
ago Mr. and Mrs. Collins had left their 
j)arents. l)ri)thers, and sisters in Penn- 
sylvania and had come to the West to 
take 1115 a h'lmestead. As none of their 
relatives could come to their home to 
live with them they passed the lonely 
days together. Mr. Collins did most 
of the house work himself until Ethel 
was able to do it for him. And as she 
was a very bright and helpful little girl, 
she soon became an expert house- 
keeper. 

Mr. Collins was very proud of his 
only daughter and did all in his power 
to make her happy. Whenever he 
was not engaged in work on the farm 
he would help her with the household 



duties. Ethel also loved her father 
dearly and was his constant companion 
doing all she knew to make him happy. 
But in spite of the interest of Ethel 
in her father he would become very 
despondent at times because of the un- 
timely death of his wife. Her last 
words and his loving daughter were 
his onl_v comfort. 

Finally, Ethel had grown to be a 
pious and cultured voung lady who was 
dearly loved by all who knew her. She 
had many friends and was held in es- 
teem in her community. Among these 
friends was a young man, Carson 
Brown, who lived only a short distance 
from her home. Carson made frequent 
visits to the Collins home where he 
was a welcome visitor. However, he 
was not so welcome to Mr. Collins, 
for he could not consent to any man 
gaining the love of his daughter. Ethel 
noticed the coldness of her father to- 
wards Carson, but never mentioned 
it to either of them. 

One day as Ethel was busy with 
her household duties, her father came 
into the house looking very despon- 
dent. Although he had been gloomy 
for the last month, yet he was more 
gloomy now than she had ever seen 
him before. He had tried to keep his 
trials to himself but now he could not 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



bear them any longer. So, with Ethel 
at his side, he had a heart to heart talk 
with her. Among other things he 
told her that he could never approve of 
her love for Carson Brown. 

Ethel, remembering the last words 
of her mother, resolved that since her 
father did not approve of her lover 
she would not encourage his visits to 
her. 

Carson soon noticed her indifference, 
and consequently his calls became less 
frequent until finally, disappointed in 
love, he left his home. Ethel often 
thought of him and tried to find out 
where he was but she had no one to 
ask,' and no one to whom she could 
confide her secrets. She did not even 
desire her father to know the longings 
of her heart for fear that it might mar 
his happiness. She denied herself 
many social pleasures for her father's 
sake, but she was nevertheless con- 
tented and happy. 

Ethel enjoyed hearing her father tell 
of his experiences in life. So one even- 
ing as they were sitting by the fireside 
she asked her father to tell the story 
of their coming to the homestead. He 
then related how he and his wife had 
left their friends in Pennsylvania and 
had come to these then uninhabited 
plains of Dakota. He also told her 
how they had endured many hardships 
before they had erected their house. 
In conclusion he told her of the rose 
bush by the side of the doorway, which 
her mother had brought from her home 
and had jilanted herself. 



Days passed months passed, and 
years passed in this home of theirs, 
but Ethel did not hear of Carson and 
did not even hear any one mention his 
name. 

One day as her father came home 
from town he gave her the local news. 
After telling a number of happenings 
in the vicinity, he also said that he had 
seen Carson, who had come home on 
his vacation. He said Carson had 
made a change for the better and was 
holding an honorable position. Ethel 
was delighted with the news and .es- 
pecially to hear her father speak so 
favorably of Carson. She was also 
eager to know if she might meet him. 

It was in the month of June when 
Ethel and her father were sitting on 
the lawn near the blooming rose bush 
and talking of the days in the past 
when they noticed a man walking up 
to them. Who could it be? Ethel 
was delighted to find it was Carson. 
He joined their company and told of 
his past experiences. While they were 
talking. Mr. Collins suddenly became 
ill. By evening his friends had no 
hope for him. As Ethel and Carson 
leaned over him that night, they 
heard him wisper his last words, 
"Ethel you have been kind to me. 
Your mother's prayer is answered. 
May good fortune come to you and the 
one who is dearest to ynu." 

Carson ct)mforted Ethel in her be- 
reavement and later lived hapjiily in 
the homestead. 



Sic Semper Tyrannis. 

H. D. Moyer 



America is to-day facing the problem 
of dethrc.ning a tyrant, who has op- 
pressed -he people for ages, who has 
tyrannized nations both great and 
small, and who with a single stroke of 
his mighty hand, has felled world em- 
pires. She is to-day facing the prob- 
lem of loosening his grip on her legis- 
lative halls, on her homes, and on her 
rising manhood. She is looking for- 
ward to the day when we can star.d up 
proudly and say to King Alcohol, "Sic 
semper tyrannis," as the world has 
-said to all tyrants down through the 
eras of history. He who oppresses his 
subjects, aiKl tyrannizes afifairs while 
f)n the t-irone. will sooner or later lose 
his p 3wer. Caesar had his Brutus ; 
Charles the First, his Cromwell, while 
the tyrant .\lcohol ruled on like an un- 
molested despot. 

Congress proposed the license law in 
1862 as a war measure for revenue, and 
railroaded it through over the veto of 
President Lincoln. For fifty years the 
skull and cross-bones have been flying 
by the side of the stars and stripes. 
For fifty years have men been sent, to 
the lowest depths of despair, under the 
protection of the law. For fifty years 
has our government been run partly 
with blood money. How much longer 
shall this tyrant remain in our legis- 
latures? How much longer will 
America be overshadowed by his ban- 
ner? How much longer will she con- 
tinue to -ell her manhood for thirty 
pieces of silver? How much longer 



mtinue to legalize 



thi 



We are to-day suffering the dread- 
ful consequences of his tyrannical rule. 
We are paying the price in human 
blood. Look with me to the over- 
crowded jails, almshouses, and insane 
asylums ; look with me to the ropes on 
the gallows and to the large financial 
deficits of the c.unties. Is not this 
waste enormous? 

Rut this is not all. King Alcohol 
has taken the last crust from the 
hungry child. He has broken the 
hearts of wi\-cs and of mothers. He 
has taken the sacredness from the 
home. The tyrant has done more. He 
has taken man, the very master-piece 
of Divine Creation, and has robbed 
him of vitalit}' and life. He has not 
only robbed him of life, but has sunk 
him into the starless, rayless, and hope- 
less night of despair. 

The American people are awakening. 
They see that in 1776 our forefathers 
longed for independance, but did not 
get it until they had tracked the snow 
with their blood at Valley Forge. They 
see that in 1861 they pleaded for the 
freedom of the slaves, but had to have 
a three day's rain of blood at Gettys- 
burg before they got it. They see that 
to-day it is not enough to dream and 
pray for prohibition. The two armies 
are already on the field. Public senti- 
ment is being aroused against it. It is 
an issue of the day. "Education, Agi- 
tation, and Legislation are the steps 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



that lead to moral reform." The traf- 
fic has been legalized by law and only 
by law can it be declared an outlaw. I 
say the American people are awaken- 
ing. The gray streaks of dawn can 
already be seen over the hills. Eleven 
states have sece ded from the tyrant's 
kingdom. Eleven states have hauled 
down the skull and cross-bones, leav- 
ing the stars and stripes to wave in 
glory. Others will soon follow ; they 
must follow. 

King Alcohol is to-day reading the 
hand-writing on the wall. He is to- 
day interpreting God's warning. And 
our fair America is catching a glimpse 
of the Galilean, and hears his voice, 
"I am come to seek and to save that 
which was lost." She is crying with 
a mighty voice to you as men to save 
her. 

This tyrant has tyrannized our coun- 
try for years, ruined our homes, and 
shattered the bright hopes of manhood, 
practically unmolested. His days of 
peaceful rule arc over. He is fight- 



ing his last battle, but it is a fight 
to the finish. Are we lined up? 
Are we willing to fight against the or- 
ganized forces of King Alcohol ? Are 
we helping the prospective emancipa- 
tion of manhood, womanhood, and 
childhood ? 

Before us are greater days than those 
of 1776; more momentous times than 
those of 1861. Before us is a fight to 
save the highest asset of America — the 
boys. Do you have a boy of whom 
you are proud ? Would you sit idly 
by if your boy were to-day filling a 
drunkard's grave ? Would you sit 
idly by if your mother were dying to- 
day of sorrow for a drunken son ? No ! 
Over their dead bodies you would 
swear eternal vengeance. I plead with 
you as citizens and voters to fight this 
iniquitous traffic like brave men. I 
appeal to you as men. to abolish it 
out of respect to your forefathers, out 
of justice to your boys, and out of 
reverence to vour God. 



Revival of Romanticism in the 19th Century. 

H. H. Nye. 



In the first half of the eighteenth 
century England passed through the 
Augustan or Classic Age of her liter- 
ature. The poetic exponents of this 
period were such writers as Pope, Dry- 
den, Swift, Addison, and Steele. This 
age was characterized by low moral 
standards in the social life of the 
Engli.sh and by a return to classicism 
in the literary realm. The literature 
was mainly devoted to satire and di- 



dacticism. It was primarily an age of 
prose. Literary products were model- 
ed mainly after the Latin and French 
standards. Horace was the "patron 
saint of criticism." There was a close 
adherence to polished regularity and 
much attention was paid to exquisite 
forms but too little interest was mani- 
fested in the thought conveyed. Deep 
feeling and sublimity of thought were 
avoided. "Anything that was strange, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



irregular, romantic, full of feeling, 
highly imaginative, or improbable to 
the intellect, was unpopular among the 
classicists." The rhyming couplet was 
the vehicle of expression in poetry, and 
no "unpruned or shapeless forms were 
tolerated." 

In the latter half of the eighteenth 
century, however, we notice a great 
change taking place in literary stand- 
ards and we see a prevalence of roman- 
tic tendencies. In order to understand 
what has wrought this change we must 
take a glance at the political history of 
England, for there seems to be a very 
close relation of cause and efifect be- 
tween the political and the literary 
history of a nation. 

In the first place we note a great 
uplift and improvement in the moral 
realm. Pitt had deposed Walpole, one 
of the mo.st corrupt politicians that 
England ever had, from his office as 
prime minister, and upon his entrance 
to office, began to appeal to the patriot- 
ism and the deep sense of honor of his 
coimtrymen. W'e see this healthful 
change not only in the political realm 
but as well throughout the moral and 
social fabric of England. 

In the realm of religion we notice 
the \\'esleys and the Whitfields wield- 
ing their ennobling influence. The 
formalities of the English Church had 
become unattractive to the common 
people. These reformers were infused 
with great religious enthusiasm and 
began to preach on subjects not involv- 
ing the exercise of strong intellectual 
power but on matters of common, 
everyday life that appeal to the 
understanding and the emotions of the 
"plain human mind." 

Furthermore, this was also the era 



when England experienced that mar- 
velous expansion which to-day makes 
her the greatest colonial empire of the 
world. Clive succeeded in driving the 
French from India, Wolfe ousted the 
French from Canada, and Cook was 
carrying the English banner across 
Australia and the islands of the Pa- 
cific. Thus we see that there was a 
healthful uplift of English morals; 
the spiritual life of the people was 
quickened ; and her civilizing influence 
and royal power spread to the four 
quarters of the globe. 

With such an upheaval in her politi- 
cal history, one would naturally ex- 
pect a great stir in the literary field 
and an outburst of literary productions. 
And such was the case ; for this was 
the period in which we see the foun- 
dations laid for the second great cre- 
ative period in English literature — the 
Victorian Age of the nineteenth cen- 
tury. Writers began to fling classical 
rules and forms to the winds and re- 
turned to Shakespeare's and Milton's 
models of romanticism for their stand- 
ards and gave free sway to the imagi- 
nation. 

The plays of Shakespeare were 
acted at this time upon the stage by 
such masters of theatrical perform- 
ance as David Garrick. He aroused 
great interest in the plays which had 
been driven from the stage by the 
Puritans of the seventeenth century, 
and captivated large audiences in Lon- 
don by his striking personality. Eng- 
lish readers again began to relish the 
great sweeps of the creative imagi- 
nation of Milton and were again de- 
lighted by his vivid descriptions of 
the supernatural. Such a decided 
change in the literary tastes of Eng- 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



lish readers and the wholesome moral, 
political, spiritual, and territorial re- 
generation of England all redounded 
toward a return of romanticism. Just 
as we see the nation liberated from a 
long period of formalism and bondage 
of the rather inactive past we now see 
English writers absorbing the spirit of 
freedom hovering in the atmosphere. 

The writers of this transition period 
were such men as Gray, Goldsmith, 
and Johnson. Of course these writers 
combined the features of the classic 
and the romantic school owing to the 
dictatorship of Johnson in English 
who was still strongly inclined to 
classicism and criticised rather severe- 



ly the Romantic tendencies. But not- 
withstanding the harsh criticism, we 
see the presence of entirely diflferent 
elements in the writings of this period. 
There is a presence of wildness with 
lofty flights of the imagination, a dis- 
regard for conventional forms, and a 
strong protest against the bondage to 
rules and customs. The writers mani- 
fest an expression of deep feeling, a 
fond appreciation of nature and hu- 
manity, and more individuality and ex- 
pression of genius. Writers began to 
dream of the Golden Age of democra- 
cy and "sank their plummets into the 
emotional depths of the soul"' and 
entered more deeply into the "under- 
standing of the human heart." 



The Girl of To-Day 

Naomi G. Longenecker. 



The savage considers the girl a slave, 
the uncivilized consider her a toy, and 
up to the time of the Reformation she 
was considered merely as a servant. 
But the girl of to-day is the equal ot 
her lirother. ^^'hat she may do as his 
etiual. and what her sphere and mis- 
sion is are great questions confronting 
her. 

The places occupied by the girl of 
to-day are more varied and numerous 
than they were fifty years ago. Con- 
ditions have changed considerably 
since then. She performs greater 
duties, bears greater responsibilities, 
and lives a broader and nobler life. 

To-day there are so many opportuni- 
ties given her in the working world. 
She is a part of it. She is essential to 



its progress. She shares with her 
brother in its gain. In this sphere she 
has not only equaled her brother, she 
has surpassed him. 

The professional world has given 
her a place. She is found at the bar, 
in the Senate, and at the head of 
political and social reform movements. 
She is found in various offices of 
prominence with her brother and has 
not only proved her ability but has 
won admiration and fame. 

She is prominent in the religious 
world. Ministers say that the Church 
would not be the institution it is were 
it not for the faithful women in it. She 
is nobly filling her place in the Church. 

She has jiroved her ability in the 
literary world, and has been given a 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



place with the standard writers of the 
day. 

The medical world has recognized 
her ahilitx-. Patients in hospital wards 
wait for her services. She has found 
this life next to the highest, for here 
she can ser\e humanity. 

All these conditions have been ob- 
served since women have been given 
an intellectual training. Does this 
new education make her unwomanly? 
Not in the eyes of the enlightened. 
Does it take her out of her sphere? 
No. She may be engaged in these lines 
of work and still be a woman in the 
highest and noblest sense. Does it 
disqualify her for her highest mission 
in life, that of home-making and ma- 
ternity? we shall see. 

So much depends on the perfect 
home, the perfect w^fe, the perfect 
mother. She rules the home. She, 
through her influence in the home, in- 
fluences the work of her husband and 
his character. She moulds the lives of 
the great men and women of the na- 
tion. Indirectly she rules the globe. 
The world to-day has lietter men and 
women than it had fifty years ago. 
The reform movements are brought 
about !)}• them. If we look into the 
historv of the homes of the great men 



of our nation we ■ find that it was 
through a woman's love, help, and en- 
couragement, that they were inspired 
to high and noble purposes. A man 
may build a palace, but he cannot 
make a home out of it. A woman 
alone can do that. It is her divine 
right. It is her privilege. 

If the place in the home is the high- 
est she can fill, why is she not content 
in it? Why is there a cry all over our 
nation for better homes? Is it the 
fault of the women alone? The girl 
of to-day sees the enemies of the home. 
She realizes that many of her sisters 
have failed. She sees the enemies of 
the home. She sees that she cannot fill 
her highest position well, so she tries 
a lower one. 

Fifty years from now there will be 
better homes. There will be fewer 
enemies of the home. There will be 
better men at the heads of the homes. 
There will be better women in them 
because of the rising standards of the 
girl of to-day. Educate the girl of to- 
day, for she will be the woman of to- 
morrow. But let her highest ideal of 
her mission in life be not in anything 
that will interfere with her place in 
the home, in anything that will make 
her lose sight of what God intended 
her to be — a mother. 



The Renaissance. 

Sara C. Shisler. 



The Renaissance was a revoluti(in 
effected in architecture, painting, sculp- 
ture, and learning. This great move- 
ment began during the Middle Ages 



and was at its height about the middle 
of the fifteenth century. It was a re- 
vival or re-birth of the elements of 
progress. However, we cannot attrib- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



ute the Renaissance to the discovery 
of books only but also to the general 
outburst of intelligence. By studying 
the history of the Middle Ages one sees 
that the fusion of the different races 
and the rise of the barbarians to a 
level with those whom they conquered 
was the main process. Therefore, the 
following causes constituted the neces- 
sary preparation for the period to fol- 
low. 

The first of these causes was the in- 
fluence of the monasteries. These, 
during the time that the lamp of cul- 
ture was burning dimly, were the cen- 
ters of culture. It was there that the 
clerg}' were educated arid the enduring 
classics were preserved. Again, had 
it not been for the monks who copied 
the ancient manuscripts and also multi- 
plied them, many of the classics would 
have been lost or ruined because no 
one else appreciated or understood 
what they contained. 

.Anc^ther cause was the influence of 
the strong Teutonic intellect. The 
personal worth that characterized the 
Germanic race was an essential ele- 
ment in causing the Renaissance. It 
was the Greeks and the Romans who 
contributed litera'ure, arts, and scien- 
ces, and the Hebrews who contributed 
Christianity; but it was the Teutons 
with their unbounded capacity for cul- 
ture and growth, who utilized the clas- 
sical learning and thereby gave it a 
circulation which has ever since en- 
abled all searching minds to feed upon 
their truths. 

Then again, the Crusades were a 
great factor in this movement. They 
were military expeditions carried on 
by the Christian peoples of Eurone 
against the Mohammedans, who held 



the holy places of Palestine. Although 
there were many results of these re 
ligious movements, the benefits de- 
rived from the touch of the people of 
the \\'est with the cultured East was 
a direct forerunner of the Renaissance. 
The Asiatic inventions as well as the 
learning gained about Graeco-.-\rabic 
science helped to stimulate and awaken 
mental activity in Western Europe. 

The next cause, an outgrowth of 
the Graeco-Arabic influence, is the in- 
fluence exerted by the Schoolmen who 
emphasized secular education. It was 
a mental revival, a period during which 
great intellectual keenness was pre- 
dominant. Consequently, there was 
not sufficient material with which the 
leaders of Scholasticism, who were 
purely intellectual, could work. An 
outgrowth of this was the founding of 
Universities in which they taught 
courses preparing students for a pro- 
fession. 

Furthermore, the attainment of more 
ci\ il freedom was a stimulus X" great- 
er intellectual freedom. Theref<^re. the 
rise of free cities acted a noticeable 
part in bringing about the great New 
Birth. 

Lastly, the influence of the Roman 
cixilization was a direct cause. In Italy 
the break between the old and the new 
civilization was not so great because 
Italy was a fragment of the old Empire 
and, consequently, the preparation was 
first made there. 

Xcxt the diflferent phases of the 
Italian Renaissance should b.- consid- 
ered. There was a revival of classical 
literature and learning as well as of 
classical art. The revival of classical 
literature is called "Humanism." Like 
anything else that is new, "Human- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



ism" had had some pioneers, the chief 
of whom are : Dante, Petrarch, 
and Boccaccio. Even though each of 
them rendered valuable services in dif- 
ferent ways, we can classify them thus, 
Dante was a writer: Petarch a collect- 
or: and Boccaccio, a translator. 
Through the extended influence of 
these great men the patrons of the new 
learning became numerous. 

The other phase of the Italian Re- 
nai.'^sance is the revival of classical 
art. For the first time painters give a 
true renresentation of human life. 
Heretofore it ^^'as physical perfection 
engraved on marble that man admired : 
but now the expression of the human 
emotions represented on canvas by the 
painter, was regarded as the only 
means of representing the true ideas 
of Christianity. 

Then, too, there were things that 
aided the Renais-^ance. Probably the 
greatest was the invention of printing. 
By this we see that only as rabidly 
as the wisdom of books was made ac- 
cessible to a laree number of people, 
and knowledee by that means made 
the common possession of all men, 
could the spirit of revival spread. 
Since conyine was a very tedious work 
there were few copies of each manu- 
script and they were available only to 
the hitrher classes. 

Another aid was the fall of Constan- 
tinople in 145.-^. Since that city was 
the headquarters of Grecian learning, 
its capture was a factor in hastening 
its influence to Western Europe. 
When the capture of that city became 
threatening, msny of the scholars went 
to Italy and took with them the 
precious Grecian manuscripts. 

Again, science was developing grad- 
ually and as a result men wished to 
know the "whv and wherefore" of all 



things. That led to much thinking 
and demonstration, one result being 
the discovery of the New World, a 
thing which was a spur upon the 
imaginations and ambitions of men. 

Furthermore, the influences and re- 
sults of the great revival are far reach- 
ing. First, the teachers of language 
and literature became very prominent. 
In those studies chairs were establish- 
ed in both the old and the new uni- 
versities, and besides, the Scholastic 
method of instruction was followed by 
the classical system. 

Then, again, in order to make the 
classic material accessible to all class- 
es, public places were opened to study 
the humanistic branches. Among the 
leaders in establishing libraries were 
the Popes. It w^as during that period 
that the largest Italian libraries were 
started. 

Unlike former times, learning was 
no longer confined to the church or the 
laity, neither were the monasteries the 
only places where information concern- 
ing the classics could be received. 
However, professors of classics moved 
about, teaching and greatly extend- 
ing the sphere of their teaching be- 
yond the favored few of earlier times. 

Lastly, its effect upon the imagina- 
tion and literature was greatest. As 
the sun and warm spring' rains are 
necessary for the buds and flowers to 
burst forth, so the Renaissance was 
a factor in giving us Shakespeare and 
other great writers in the next century. 
Men were very ambitious and a many 
sidedness of life resulted. The differ- 
ent classes of people mingled with 
less friction than they did before, and 
for the fiirst time every type of hu- 
manitv found recognition, and every 
possible feeling of man found expres- 
sion in literature. 




EDITORIAL BOARD 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, Editx)r-in-Chief 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Mary G. Hershey... School Nbtes 1 J- D- Reber Alumni Notes 

Robert J. Ziegler I Isaac J. Kreider Bxcaanges 

Nora L. Reber Homerlan News 1 J. H. Gingrich Business Manager 

Naomi Longenecker K. L, S. News I Daisy P. Rider Art Editor 

C. J. Rose. Athletics 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year by Elizabethtown 

College. 
This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their Hies, 

and arrearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates: — Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for $2.00 
Entered as second-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



A Good School Paper. 

Juurnalism is to-day a proft-ssion 
and its importance is felt by all of our 
educational institutions. Nearly all 
colleges and academies publish a 
monthly paper, and even the high 
school has found it advantageous to 
issue such a publication. Just as there 
are good schools and inferior ones, so 
there are good and inferior school 
papers. In this article we shall aim to 
set forth what constitutes a good 
school paper. 

In the first place the paper should 



aim to portray the work of the school. 
Any one not connected with the school 
ouglit to be able to form a fairly re- 
liable judgment of the work that is 
done at the school by a careful reading 
of its school paper. The articles pub- 
lished should therefore be such that 
will give a reader this information. 
The paper should also set forth the 
ideals of the school. We receive some 
exchanges from schools in which the 
ideals of the students are not what 
we should like them to be. However, 
these ideals may be truly stated and 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



15 



the paper thus be a good reHection of 
the student life of these institutions. 
By the kind of news published, by 
the kind of jokes printed, and even by 
the articles found in the literary de- 
partments of our exchanges one may 
form a fairly good opinion of the 
ideals < f the schools they represent. 

Another aim of the school paper is 
to stimulate the student body in the 
writing of original productions. One 
of the most striking weaknesses of our 
college students is their inabi'-ty tJ 
write an original production without 
marring the King's English. To be- 
come a good writer requires practice 
and even then a student's English may 
not be free from faults but these may 
be overlooked if there is abundance of 
virtues. We hope students will take 
more interest in their school papers 
in the future and try to write the best 
article=. possible for them. We wMsh 
to commend those papers who offer 
prizes for the best original story, es- 
say, oration, or symposium. It gives 
the student the training he needs and 
at the same time affords excellent ma- 
terial for publication. 

There are several important benefits 
to be derived from a good school paper. 
In the first niace. it is an excellent 
advertisement for an institution. Those 
who read its pages form a good idea 
of the school, as to the work done in 
the class-room and asto the atmosphere 
which prevails in the buildings and 
on the campus. The litera-y denart- 
ment should have such articles that 
will stimulate thought, and arouse in- 
terest in some problem that is worth 
investigating. A good article by a 
young man or woman may make glad 
the heart of a father or mother who 



reads it. Such an article will win the 
heart of a patron to the work of the 
school and will make him a staunch 
defender of the institution. 

With the publishing of a school 
paper is connected a large amount of 
work which, if faithfully performed, 
will give valuable experience to a stu- 
dent. The bi'siness manager receives 
priceless experience in soliciting adver- 
tisements, in collecting and payin j all 
bills, and in keeping a subscription list 
in a systematic way. The associate 
editor^ have an excellent opportunity 
for observation, investigation, and criti 
cism. The Editor-in-chief by doing 
his duty faithfully will receive valuable 
training in the correction of manu- 
scripts and in the writing of an Edi- 
torial monthly on some phase of school 
life. 

The school paper should bring bene- 
fits to those outside of the Editorial 
staff. There is no need of a cry for 
lack of material for the liter-ry deoart- 
nient if the Editor-in-chief and the 
teachers of rhetoric and cimposition 
work together. Each issue of the pa- 
per should have from four to six liter- 
ary articles each month. If they can 
not be secured from the different de- 
partment* of school work, let the 
Editor-in-chief fall back uDon a supply 
reserved by the English department of 
the school. By such a svstem the stu- 
dents derive real bene'i's from their 
school pape-. 

We shall now consider what depart- 
ments of a paper are essential to a 
good live school paper. 

We place first the Li'erary Depart- 
ment, which •^h Hild not merely be 
first in name but first in real im-^ort- 
ance. The true test of a good school 



16 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



paper is the worth of its literary 
articles. These articles should be 
varied and written in a clear simple 
style. A paper from the science de- 
partment, one from the history depart- 
ment, one from the pedagogical depart- 
ment, and one or two on some practical 
theme would afford good variety for an 
isse. The short story is alway.-^ ap- 
preciative and an occasional oration 
is invigorating. An original poem 
adds charm and always dignifies a 
school paper. We believe that special 
issues by societies, classes, or depart- 
ments are conducive of much good to 
a student body and that they should 
receive encouragement from the man- 
agement of an institution. 

No paper is complete withcnit a de- 
partment of School Notes. Here is 
where the reader may enter into the 
life of a .student body and feel the 
pulse of an institution. We also be- 
lieve that all athletic news belongs 
under this department unless a school 
exists primarily for the training of 
athletes. \\"e have on our exchange 
table, school papers that devote nearly 
one-half of their available space to 
printing athletic news. There is a 
serious mental alx'rration in the minds 
of some Editors that accounts for 
this lack of proper proportion. We 
advise those schools to re-incorporate 
, as "Athleti-colleges." 

In this department should be placed 
the news from the literary societies. 
We do not mean by news a mere state- 
ment of the programs rendered but a 
report of the business done, the pro- 
gress of the society as a whole and of 
its members, and a criticism of the 
programs rendered. .^ fair criticism 
stimulates a student to better work. 



All announcements of lectures, 
musicales, socials, anniversaries, and 
other programs should appear under 
this department. 

The school paper that is interesting 
to an old student is full of notes about 
the happenings in various parts of the 
buildings. He is also interested in any 
news about his former teachers. The 
humorous statements sometimes made 
in the class-room are interesting to any 
reader, and they should be gathered 
from the various teachers by some one 
appointed by the Editor-in-chief. 
These, with perhaps an occasional joke 
which has some bearing on student 
life, are all the jokes a gnod school 
paper should publish. 

We have several exchanges that con- 
tain as many pages of "whim-whams" 
and "snifT-snaffs" as of literature arti- 
cles. Space in a college paper is too 
precious for this "maudlin mass" of 
nonsense. We believe in jokes, but 
not in the exclusion of good reading 
matter for three or four pages of cop- 
ied funny anecdotes. Some of our 
exchanges need a good house cleaning 
and a confiscation of old furniture. 
May we print original jokes and witti- 
cisms, those that actually happened at 
our own school. 

A college paper must beware of 
publishing too many i)ersonal notes. If 
the person is known to a majority of 
the readers of the paper, the note may 
be inserted; if not, it should be omit- 
ted. In a high school paper this is 
diflerent, because its readers are not 
so scattered. 

Another department that is import- 
ant is the Alumni De]>artnient. We 
readily agree that the position of 
Alumni editor is hard to fill because 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



of the difficulty in getting news. Be- 
cause of this fact, each graduate should 
feel it his duty to report any change 
in his position, any marriage, and any- 
thing else that may be cf interest, to 
the Alumni editor. We hope no one 
will criticize the scarcity of Alumni 
news and not bear in mind these state- 
ments. This department is usually of 
great interest, to the Alumni, because 
here they may read of friends of form- 
er school days. May we all do our 
share in making the most out of tris 
department. . 

Every school should have an Ex- 
change Department. Here should be 
expressed a fair criticism of other 
school papers. Too much of the criti- 
cism in many of our exchanges is too 
superficial. W'e have noticed criti- 
cisms on certain articles printed in 
our paper which show this ; for ex- 
ample: "The short story 'Standing 
.Alone' is well written and has an excel- 
lent climax." This production, in 
fact, is an essay. The exchange editor 
of that paper either did not read the 
essay at all or else was gone "wool 
gathering"' while glancing over it. Too 
many exchange editors apparently 
scrape a few husks together, have it 
printed, and then pose as critics of 
college publications. To be an ex- 
change editor means much paii^staking 
work, but at the same time affords an 
excellent drill in literary criticism. We 
■do not think it necessary to publish the 
names of all papers received every 
month. Use your space for better 
things. The fact that you receive no 
notice from your postmaster is evi- 
dence that your papers are received. 
Some exchanges have "Please Ex- 
change" on every issue of their paper 



we receive. If we lift a pajjer we al- 
ways exchange. 

We also notice a tendency fur some 
exchange editors to turn their depart- 
ment into a joke and conundrum cor- 
ner. You might as well use a buck saw 
to play a cornet solo. You have no 
conception of what part your depart- 
ment should play in a good school 
paper. 

The Editorial Department of a paper 
should be original and reflect the per- 
sonality of the Editor-in-chief and con- 
tain an article each month on S(jme 
phase of school life. A wide-awake 
editor of a college paper will see the 
problems of the students and must feel 
the pulse of the student body. He 
must then aim to aid the student by 
some theme pertinent to his trials. He 
must be on the alert to commend 
worthy conduct on the part of the 
student body and firm in upholding the 
honor of the institution at all times. 
He must also act as censor of what is 
to be published. Each school has its 
aims and whatever conflicts with these 
aims must be eliminated from a college 
paper. 

In conclusion we desire to state that 
a school paper should also have a staff 
of artists to design departmental cuts 
and cover designs. Some of our ex- 
changes produce a feeling of antipathy 
on looking at the cover design. Too 
many are meaningless, cold, and stiff. 
Let there be some lesson in each de- 
sign, without which it is not artistic, 
according to our view of art. We are 
also inclined to believe that the best 
taste would reject all advertisements 
from the cover pages, inside and out- 
side. 

Wc hope our schools may be more 



18 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



considerate of their publications in the 
future and use careful discretion in the 
appointment of the Editorial staff. We 
do not claim to have a perfect paper in 
"Our College Times," but we feel that 
we have been growing and that some 
of nur exchanges are commending us 



on our "strong literary department." 
To those who expect a joke depart- 
ment in our paper we would say that 
we have little room for nonsense. 
When our essays run low we may buy 
a copy of Puck and reprint a few jokes- 
for you. May we all strive for a 
better school paper. 



Resolutions of Sympathy. 

Whereas, The Angel of Death has 
plucked little Henry from the home of 
Professor H. K. Ober to bloom in 
God's own garden, be it 

Resolved, That we, the Faculty and 
the Students of Elizabethtown College 
do hereby sincerely tender our heart- 
felt sympathies to Professor and Mrs. 
Ober and their family. 

Resolved, That we commend the be- 



reaved family to our Heavenly Father 
who doeth all things well and who is 
the great sympathizer and comforter. 

Resolved, That a copy of these reso- 
lutions be sent to the sorrowing family, 
and that a copy of the same be printed 
in Our College Times and in each of 
the town papers. 

J. G. Meyer 
Rhoda E. Miller 
Laura M. Landis 

Committee 



~-^^^^K^' 




5 



Ho 







t 



u 



Not only have we been surprised 
but we have been made to look in 
amazement as we observed the trans- 
formation of Nature all about us these 
last few days. The fields which a few 
weeks ago were brown and bare are 
now covered with a velvety green ; 
the hills are cloaked ; the woodlands 
have become a picture upon which one 
can not gaze without great admiration 
and wonder, for in a mysterious way 
that which was but a short time ago, 
so bare and cold, has now been trans- 
formed into a wonderland. 

All around is the fresh, dainty green 
of the unfolding leaves, while the 
bloom of the cherry trees gleams out 
pure and fresh in the sun light. The 
dog-wood also has burst into bloom 
so profusely that the woodlands are 
dotted here and there with its mass of 
white blossoms. How has it all come 
so mysteriously? One week ago we 
looked and saw scarcely a bud, when 
lo, the next week our eyes gazed upon 
a profusion of white blossoms. Here 
and there the delicate pink of the Judas 
blossom or perchance a peach tree 
peeps from out the green foliage like a 
bashful child timidly seeking to see 



what the world without has to offer. 
We attempt to speak of the beauty of 
the bursting bud and unfolded blos- 
som but the mystery lies forever hid- 
den from us. We say it is the effect 
of the sunshine and the showers and 
explain the various chemical changes 
but the wonder of it we cannot 
fathom. 

As nature has changed so rapidly 
and mysteriously before our uncon- 
scious eyes, so have the days and 
months of our school year glided away 
unconsciously before us and we now 
find ourselves nearing the close of the 
school year. On the eleventh day of 
June the class of nineteen hundred 
fourteen will bid farewell to College 
Hill. They, too, have been unfolding, 
developing, and forming their possi- 
bilities into realities. As the flowers 
have grown and developed by means 
of the showers and the sunshine, so 
.too the members of this class have 
grown and developed through the dif- 
ficulties and discouragements which 
they have had to face and through the 
sunshine of success and of encourage- 
ment ; and this process too has all gone 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



on unconsciously and mysteriously, 
for it all deals with nature, the handi- 
work of God. 

We, who are not yet ready to leave 
the Hill, express both our regret and 
pleasure to those who are leaving. We 
are sorry to have them absent from 
our number but are glad to have them 
enter the world and learn new lessons 
as well as share those already learned 
with those with whom they shall meet 
at different places. We extend to 
them our heartiest wish for their fur- 
ther success and happiness. 

Five members of the faculty attend- 
ed the District Meeting, held by the 
Brethren at Midway, Lebanon County, 
on Thursday, April 29 and 30. Profes- 
sor Ober served as Writing Clerk of 
the meeting. Dr. Reber was present 
in the interests of the forthcoming 
History of the Brethren in Eastern 
United States. Professors Meyer and 
Schlosser were delegates to the meet- 
ing, representing the Elizabeth 'own 
Church. 

We all miss little Mildred Meyer on 
College Hill since she is quarantined 
with whooping cough. We all wish 
her a speedy recovery. 

Professor J. G. Meyer visited Mid- 
way and H'eidelberg Sunday Schools 
as a substitute for the District Sunday 
School Secretary. He also preached 
very instructive serini^ns at Midway 
and Lebanon. 

Carrie Dohner a foriner student 
now in training in the General Hospit- 
al in Lancaster, visited her sister 
Linnie and friends on College Hill. 

Rhoda Miller, Ada Douty, and Edna 
Brubaker spent May i to May 3 at 
Lititz, visiting Miss Brubaker's home. 



Mrs. Perry of New York, the mother 
of our fellow student Bertha Perry 
spent several days at the College visit- 
ing her daughter. 

Misses Mary Bowman and Minnie 
Kreider of Palmyra visited at the Col- 
lege as guests of Miss Edna Hofifer. 

The agricultural class under Profes- 
sor Ober are getting some valuable 
experience by pruning the College or- 
chard. Wait till the fruit is ripe. We 
will all want to be farmers then. 

Andrew Dixon and Holmes Falken- 
stein of Juniata, and Francis Olweiler 
of Yale, two former students, were re- 
cent visitors on College Hill. 

Mary E. Gish, one of our former 
students, was married to Harry S. 
Smeltzer of Harrisburg. Irene Sheetz 
and Harry Shank of Quarryville both 
former students of E. C. were also 
married recently. To both these 
couples we extend our heartiest con- 
gratulations and best wishes. 

Invitations for the wedding of Elma 
Brandt, a member of the class of 191 1. 
to Leo Blanck on May 21 at her home, 
have been received by her fritnds. 

On Tuesday evening. May 12. a 
Suffrage meeting was held in the Col- 
lege Chapel. Mrs. Happer, Chairman 
of the County Equal Suffrage Associa- 
tion, and Mrs. Howard, State Organ- 
izer, addressed the students and 
friends of the College. This meeting 
proved interesting and instructive. 

The Spring Concert given by the 
Music Departme-it of the College 
proved t<i be a grand success. The 
large audience showed interest, and 
their attentive attitude was evidence 
of the-r appreciation as well as their 
kind words afterward given. Mis< 



I 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



Kline deserves praise for the excellent 
work she has been doing. The follow- 
ing program was rendered : 

1. King of Glory— Part L 

2. Piano Quartet, Lustspiel Ov., Bela 
Misses Miller, Dennis. Frymeyer and 

Mr. Ensfle. 

3. King of Glory— Part IL 

4. Piano Quartet, Hallelujah, Handel 
Misses Miller. Dennis. Frymeyer and 

Mr. Engle 

5. Vocal Solo. 

Elizabeth Kline. 

6. Instrumental Solo, Rigoletto, 

Verdi-Liszt 
Marv Elizabeth Miller 

7. King of Glory-Parts HL-IV. 

8. Gloria Mozart 

Mr. Mack Falkenstein who has serv- 
ed as the editor of the Literary Echo 
of the Keystone has written several 
papers which were humorous, interest- 
ing, and cleverly written. 

Several items of interest were : 
Our Favorite Pastimes. 

Mr. P.ecker: Reading the "Comics" 
in the newspapers. 

Mr. Zug: Trying on the girls' spring 
millinery at dinner time. 

Miss Coble: Blushing. 

Air. Nefif: Eating. 

Mr. Rose: Singing. 

Miss Perry : Sighing. 

Bobby: Haunting the library, wait- 
ing for something to turn up.. 

Reuben Ziegler : Dreaming of home 
and Hannah. 

The Outing. 

The arbutus outing last Saturday 
was perhaps the most important social 
event since the "feed and jubilee" of 
the S. C. G. C. between terms. The 
day was ideal and tho "bunch" left 
College Hill shortly before one o'clock, 
in the best of spirits but in some dis- 
order. This was soon remedied, how- 
ever, when about nine-tenths of the 



orderly double file. Green Tree was 
reached after a walk variously esti- 
mated to be from one and a half to 
four and a half miles, and the "crowd" 
immediately began to have trouble in 
crowd with one accord, fell into a most 
keeping in sight of each other. This 
peculiar difficulty is accounted for, 
when we remember that man is prone 
to wander (especially if there's a wo- 
man along). 

With the afternoon pleasantly spent, 
all faces were again turned toward 
College Hill. The return was a rath- 
er "strung out" affair. One could not 
help but think of Napolean's retreat 
from Moscow. The vanguard arrived 
about four. The day student boys 
brought up the rear about one hour 
later and surrendered their charges to 
Miss Myer, who cheerfully informed 
them that if they had come five min- 
utes sooner, they might have taken the 
ladies down to supper. As a consola- 
tion she kindly granted them permis- 
sion to sit on the back steps and get 
the benefit of all the savory odors ris- 
ing from the kitchen. 

The Outing, as judged by members 
of the "bunch." Mr. Burkhart. on the 
way home, stopped at a farm house 
and got a drink of water. As he drain- 
ed the first cup he said "Ah-h ! That's 
the first thing I enjoyed to day." Mr. 
Hershey had nothing to sav : his de- 
light was bej'ond the power of mere 
words. It took Miss Perry about 
three minutes to tell us how inexpres- 
sible it was. Mr. Miller said it was the 
most fun he had since he was a boy. 
Miss Horst said she took advantage of 
the wonderful opportunity of stuiying 
and admiring nature — she did not say 
whose nature. Mr. Herr said his only 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



regret was that there were no moving 
pictures. 

Extraordinary facts which came to 
light in our various classes. 

Mr. Engle in American Literature: 
"Franklin wrote his father's autobi- 
ography." 

"Out in Utah it's so dry they must 
farm I)}- navigation." Miss Shank in 
Geography. 

"Spinach is a kind of lettuce." Mr 
Zug in Agriculture. 

Did you ever hear these expressions 
before? "Believe me." " Sam Hill, " "I'd 
like to be excused." "I didn't have 
time." "Here he comes, fellows." "I 
had some work at home." "O Herry." 
"I tell you, when I was in Cali- 
fornia." "Never laughed so much in 
my life." "Did you ask Miss Myer?" 
"The paper was up to the usual stand- 
ard." "\\ hr]'s the chicken?" "Good 
night." 

Miss Stauffer. (at the table), "Mr. 
Beans do you care for any more Neflf?" 
In order to harmonize, the answer 
.should have been something like this, 
"No, thank me, I don't care for some, 
I just had any." 

"S. C. G. C." What is it? 

The base ball diamond has been put 
in excellent condition, chiefly through 
the eft"(irts of Mr. Kreider, and the 
.season is opening in earnest. Mr. 
NefT. the president of the B. B. Asso- 
ciation urges all the boys on College 
Hill who claim any trace of red blood 
in their systems, to join the association 
and get into the spirit of the game. 

Tile following was inadvertently 
overheard, "Mr. Rebcr. will you have 
some matrimony?" A. L., "No, thank 
you, I've had a considerable share of 



it." And it's about right; isn't it, A. 
L. ? 

Macaroni was served at dinner the 
other day. It went under the name of 
matrimony, which goes to show the 
general trend of thought and conver- 
sation of some. 

Does the following suggest anything 
to you ? 

Mary Elizabeth — letter — open — 
tickled — re-read seven times — far away 
look — every day — Oh my ! 

The titles if books and what they 
might mean. 

The Idlers— Day Students. 

A Splendid Hazard— Walking with 
a girl without' Miss Myer's consent. 

The Harvesters— The Agricultural 
class when the strawberries get ripe. 

A Tale of Two Cities— Palmyra and 
Florin. 

Ry the way — Miss Mary Elizabeth's 
and Mr. Moyer's thoughts often run 
in the same direction. There's a rea- 
son. 

Rev. and Mrs. William Zobler of 
Fruitville Pike, paid a visit to the Col- 
lege and donated a hive of bees a few 
weeks ago. We appreciate the kind- 
ness of these friends of the College. 

Professor Schlosser attended a love- 
feast in the Indian Creek congregation, 
delivered a temperance sermon in 
Lansdale and also preached in Souder- 
ton on May 2 and 3. On May 9 and 
10 he visited in York county and 
preached at Davidsburg and Holtz- 



Homerian Society. 
The last public program that was 
rendered was not quite so lengthy as 
usual. The trio which appeared for 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



the first time consisted of Katherine 
Miller, Nora Reber, and Carrie Den- 
nis.. They sang a selection entitled 
"The Dance of the Fairies." The next 
number was a recitation by Carrie Den- 
nis. It was short but well recited. L 
J. Kreider gave a discussion on the 
subject, "Beauties in Nature." It was 
well composed and full of very good 
thoughts. The instrumental solo was 
played by Carrie Dennis. The last 
feature of the program was a talk on 
"Superstitions" given by Walter F. 
Eshleman. It was interesting and hu- 
morous. 

K. L. S. Notes. 

On April 24, the Keystone Literary 
Society again met in literary session. 
Ruth Landis. the newly elected presi- 
dent, gave her inaugural address. We 
hope that, as a result of her speech, 
many more may join the society and 
join in sharing its benefits. An instru- 
mental solo was given by Bertha Per- 
ry. Arthur Miller then gave a decla- 
mation entitled "The Memory of the 
Just." George Capetanios being asked 
for an impromptu speech surprised as 
\\ell as amused the society by giving it 
in his native tongue which is Greek. 
and it was indeeed Greeek to the so- 
ciety. A beautiful song entitled "He is 
Risen" was sung by Jacob Gingrich. 
E-)hraim Meyer read "The Ambitious 
Youth." A ladies' quartette then sang 
"Brave Heart Sleep On." The program 
closed by the reading of the Literary 
Echo by the editor .A.. M. Falkenstein. 

The program on Friday, May i, 
opened with a vocal solo by Ephraim 
Meyer. It was entitled "Fiddle and I." 
Harry Moyer then gave in a forceful 
way an oration entitled "Sic Semper 
Tvrannis." ,\ declamation entitled 



"National Honor" was given by Paul 
Engle. The sight reading class then 
sang a song, after which the question 
Resolved, That prose has a greater in- 
fluence on civilization than poetry, was 
debated. The affirmative speakers 
were Anna Brubaker and Ira Herr; 
the negative Ruth Landis and Robert 
Ziegler. Much interest was manifest- 
ed in the speeches. Elam Zug then 
sang "Oh for a Day in Spring." We 
hope to hear from him srion again. 
The Literary Echo by Mack Falken- 
stein was then read and apparently en- 
joyed by all. 

Athletics 

Tennis is reaching its height. Those 
students who are very closely attached 
to each other by the bonds of affection 
are especially taking advantage of the 
tennis courts. All take a great de- 
light in this game. Why? Because it 
develops one's thinking powers and 
judgment. At the same time it makes 
one more accurate, agile, and helps to 
develop a strong physical body. 

On the other hand, we are made to 
ask why not more of our students be- 
come interested in base ball. The 
trustees of the College have given us 
permission to play this game by teams 
from our student body, and why 
should we not avail ourselves of this 
opportunity? We are not receiving the 
full benefit of our school days, if we 
do not affiliate ourselves with the 
base ball association. We do not 
realize that we are seeing some good 
games played free of cost, while at 
other Colleges admission is charged. 
Remember students, we ar,- pleading 
for better support and greater interest 
in this kind of sport. Base ball also 



24 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



has its value, just as well as tennis. 
Why not then take advantage of it 
and become a broader minded and a 
well-proportioned man? 

On May i a very interesting game 
was played between the Herrites and 
the Hersheyites. Only a few errors 
were credited to each infield, because 
our base ball diamond has lately re- 
ceived a finishing touch. The follow- 
ing was the line-up and score: 

Hersheyites. Herrites 

Rose, 2b. Engle, 3b 

Sheetz, ss. Musselman, p, ss. 



Reber, A. L., lb Herr,ss.,p 
Kreider, 3b. Geyer, c. 

Hershey, p Zug, ib. 

Falkenstein, c. Reber, J. D., 2b. 

Royer, If. Hess, rf. 

Wise, rf. Becker, If. 

Herrites 000023 2 — 7 

Hersheyites 201050 x— 8 

Runs scored: ,Rose i, Sheetz i, Re- 
ber, A. L. 2, Hershey 2, Falkenstein i, 
Royer i, Engle i, Herr 2, Geyer i, 
Zug 2, Reber J. D. i 

Two base hits — Herr 2. Engle, A. L. 
Reber. 




In the last i&sue we stated that Amos 
Geib, '09, was soon to assume his du- 
ties as pastor of the Brooklyn church. 
We wish to correct this error. Eld. J. 
Kurtz Miller, who has been pastor for 
the past fourteen years is still the 
present pastor and elder in charge. 
However. Eld. Miller is giving Mr. 
,Geib the opportunity to get valuable 
experience in church work in general, 
along with his studies at Columbia 
University. 

Miss Irene Sheetz, '13, was married 
to Harry Shank of Quarryville, Pa. 
Mr. Shank also was a student here 
several years ago. 



Holmes Falkenstein, 10, filled a va- 
cancy in a western Pennsylvania high 
school for several weeks. Mr. Falken- 
stein also called at the College several 
days ago. 

Merton Crouthamel, '11, is finishing 
an unexpired term, as teacher in a 
graded school. He will finish the A. 
B. course this spring at Juniata Col- 
lege. 

'Ray Gruber, '10, was lately married 
to Miss Violet Shank of Reading, Pa. 
He now lives near Bachmansville, Pa., 
where he has been teaching since his 
graduation. 




Exchanges 

The Narrator — A strong literary de- 
partment. Ever)- article is well worth 
while reading. Especially the articles 
on "American Supremacy in Athletics" 
and "A Nation's Curse." The class of 
1914 may be proud with their last 
issue. 

In the Hebron Star, the proceedings 
of the school are brought out very 
nicely. Let everybody read the article, 
"Students Should Spend More Time 
Reading in the Library." 

The Tech Tatier is a versatile paper. 
We think, however, that the best, and 
practically all, magazines use the two 
column page. 

High School Impressions — One of 
the best high school papers on our 
exchange table. Editorials are very 
good. Perhaps one or more addition- 
al themes or stories would improve 
your fine paper. 

The Clipper writes, "There is a de- 
cided improvement in your literary de- 
partment this month. Get some jokes 
and clever sayings and make your pa- 
per more spicy." 

We gratefully acknowledge the fol- 
lowing April issues: The Villa Marian, 
M. H. Aerolith, The Owl. The Amulet. 
The Blue and White, Linden Hall 
Echo. The Red and Black, The Ursin- 



us Weekly, The Purple and Gold, The 
College Rays, The Blue and White, 
High School News, The Palmerian, 
The Collegian, The Dickinsonian, 
Goshen College Record. Delaware Col- 
lege Review, Juniata Echo, The Lafay- 
ette, The Daleville Leader, The Philo- 
mathean Monthly, The Sunburian 
High, Bethany Bible School Bulletin, 
The Carlisle Arrow, The Pattersonian, 
The Dynamo, The Optimist, The Hall 
Boy, The High School Herald. The 
Friendship Banner, The Berean Work- 
er, The Yucca, Evangelical Visitor, 
The Pharetra, and The Gettysburgian. 

Through the Looking-glass in April. 
The Mirror: "Our College Times— A 
very well arranged paper. The print 
is excellent, but the pleasure in read- 
ing your paper is not alone for the 
print, but for the good material print- 
ed." 

The Norman School Herald, "One 
of the strong features of a school peri- 
odicals is its literary department. In 
this Our College Times is excellent 
with its short stories, book reviews, 
and original essays. The paper pre- 
senting a comparative study of Egypt- 
ian and Greek Culture, in the February 
number, is especially stimulating and 
indicative of careful research on the 
part of the writer. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 

e BEE HIVE STORE 



4L^ 



For 

DRY GOODS 

and 
NOTIONS 

RAIN COATS 

and 
UMBRELLAS 



SKoes, Etc 
"Something New Every Day." 



CONDUCTED ON SANITARY PRIN- 
CiPLCS IS THE 

RALPH CROSS 

Shaving Parlor 

Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. 
None Better. Few as Good. 

D. H. BECK 

South Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN 

The baker who knows how. Phone or drop 

a postal. 

BISHOP'S SYUDIO 

PHOTOS OF ALL STYLES 

FRAMING NEATLY EXECUTED 
Kodaks and Films for sale. Amateur 
Finishing Solicited. Work Guaranteed. 

Centre Square. 



LEO KOB 

: Heating and 

Plumbing 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




SWEATERS 
UNDERWEAR 
HOSIERY 
NECKWEAR 

and 
FANCY 

GOODS 

A. A. ABELE, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

The Pratt 
Teacliers' Agency 

70 Fifth Avenue 
New York 

Receives calls at all seaioni for col- 
lege and iioim^l graduates, specialists 
and other teachers in co. leges, public 
and private scl cols in all parts of ttie 
loinitry. 

Advises parents about tchools. 

WM. 0. PRATT, Manager. 

Plain Suits Ready-Made or Ordered. 

Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats 

CANSMAN'S 

S. W. Cor, N. Queen and Orange Sts. 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Kodaks and Supplies Athletic Goods 

Kodaks and supplies of all kinds al- 
ways on hand in the famous Eastman 
quality. Don't forget us -when in need 
of supplies for in or out door sports. 

HARRY K. DORSHEIMER 

E.xclusive agency for Hopewell Choc- 
olate Dainties. 



School Supplies. 



Cutlery 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



27 



iG.Win.REISNER 

I Manufacturing 

I Jeweler 

^ College Jewelry of the Better Sort. 

s Class Pins and Rings, Prize Cups, Fra- 
B ternity Jewelry, Medals. 

I Watches Diamonds Jewelry 

1 120 E. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 

7ainiiBi!iHii(iHii::BiiiiiBiiiiBiiiiaiiiiiaiiiiiBiiiiBiiiBiiiiniiiiia»iiaii 

CENTRAL 
MEAT MARKET 

All Kinds of Choice 
Fresh and Smoked Meats. 
H. H. GOOD, Elizabethtown, Pa. I 

WE DO IT RIGHT 

Shoe Repairing 

S. K. BARNES & SON 



• ♦ ♦ ♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦•flll 'l * * * 



; F. T. MUTH 



H. M. MUTH 



; MUTH BROS 



LUMBERoii 

Also all kinds of building material 
and mill work. Slate and Cement, 
Wheeler Screens, Fertilizer, Patent 
Plaster and Sackett Plaster Board,etc. 
COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, ETC. 

We aim to give you a square deal 
that will merit your trade and friend- 
ship. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

♦t m^fcX i* I ♦♦♦ » »♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦ 



Franklin and Marshall 
College, Lancaster, Pa. 

LANCASTER, PA. 
Offers liberal courses in 

ARTS and SCIENCES. 

Campus of fifty-four acres with ten 

buildings including Gymnasium and \ 

complete Athletic Field. S 

For catalogue apply to f 

HENRY H. APPLE, D.D., LL.D., Pres. ^ 

F. DISSINGER and H. H. GARMAW 
GENERAL BLACKSMITHS and 
REPAIR WORK .... 
Horseshoeing a Specialty. 

N. Market Street, Elizabethtown. 

F. D. CROFF & BRO, 

Meat Market 

NORTH MARKET ST. 



Carry 
This Pen 
Upside Down , 



- if you want to. Yes, in any posi- 
ioD. any pocket. 

Boys: cairy the Parker Jack Knife 
Pen in your trousers pocket along 
kvilh your keys. 

Girls: carry it in the pocket of 



leavmg a pinhead spot of ink any- 
where it has been earned. 

Write > just imagine a pen of 
glass that melts to ink as you slide it 
across paper! That'sthewayit writes. 

Price$2.50up. Get one on trial. 
Take it back any time within 10 
days if you're not tickled to death 
wiLS it. We authorize dealer to re- 
Parkers, write us for catalog tod^y. 



PARKER 

Jax* Knife Safety 

FOUNTAIN PEN 



28 Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 



Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
tion at ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE. 

Seven Reasons : 

Efficient Faculty. 
Splendid Library. 
Healthful Location. 
Ideal Surroundings. 
Growing Attendance. 
Christian Home. 
Modern Equipment. 

For further particulars, address 



Elizabethtown College 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



D. H. MARTIH 

Ready-Made Clothing, Furnishings, '3hoes and Notions 



North East Corner Centre Square, 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



JACOB FISHER 
Watchmaker & Jeweler 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 
With you for 35 years. THAT'S ALL 

Lehman & Wolgemuth 
COAL 

WOOD, GRAIN, FEED, FLOUR 

Telephone 

2 ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENN'A ^ 

jl'>i"I"I"I"I"I"I'4"I'^"I"I"I"I"I**l*''I**I*»I*4**l*^*I"l*4*4"l"*I'4» 

FURNITURE 

F. C. FISHER 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - - - PENN'A 

Chas. B. Dierolf 

DRUGGIST 
ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 

W. R. Ashenfelter 

CHOICE BREAD AND 

CAKES 

Weddings and Parties supplied with 
Fancy Cakes at Short Notice. 

S. Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA 

^♦♦♦♦♦^^^ ^ ♦♦^ " l^■ | ^^' ^ ^■ l ■^ l ■■ l ■^^^ l ■^ l ^^^^♦^l^♦^^■^■^^♦^ 



FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING. 

Rubber heels make walking easy. A trial 
will convince. Work guaranteed. Prices 
reasonable. All kinds of shoe findings for 
sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

URSINUS COLLEGE, CollegevllleT PaT 

(24 miles from Philadelphia) 
Group system of instruction. University 
trained faculty. High standards of scholar- 
ship. Athletics encouraged but controlled. 
No fraternites or exclusive clubs. Strong 
Christian influences. New dormitories and 
dining halls. Men and women admitted to 
all courses. 

SUMMER SESSION 
Oldest and most inviting college summer 
school in Pennsylvania. College courses 
and preparatory studies. Teaching by heads 
of departments. Large shaded campus and 
cool buildings. Terms low. 
GEORGE LESLIE OMWAKE, Pd.D., Pres. 

ELIZABETHTOWN DENTAL PARLORS 

Office Closed Thursday 
and Friday. 
S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 
We furnish everything In 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 

Y. M. C. A. BIdg., LANCASTER, PA. 



H. H, BRANDT 



ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 
SLATE and ROOFING PAPER 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of ifour Patronage. 



We ELIZABETHTOWN HERALD 

$1.00 A YEAR 
Estimates on any kind of Job Printing. Linotyping for the Trade. 



;J. N. OLWEILER: 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 
Shipped every Wednesday. 



' ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'A 



»H I i I I nil 1 S I I 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 I l"M ■ ! ■ * 

DENTIST 

GEO. rt. KERSEY 
Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. W. CAIN 

store Adjoining Federal Room 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - - - PENN'A 



JOHN A. FISHER 

BARBER 

Centre Square, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

iiiBiMiBi!iiiBii:ai"jHiiiniiiinaiiiiiniiiHiiiitBiii;BiiiiBMiaiiiiV 

JOS. H. RIDER & SON j 

AGENCY FOR | 

I 

SPALDING'S I 

I 

Baseballi Tennis Goods! 

■ 
iiiiaiiiiiaiiiiiBiiiiiainiiBiiiiiBi 



The place to buj;, 
Stationery, Pennants, Souvenir Goods, Post 
Cards, and hundreds of articles for your 
pleasure and convenience. Our candies are 
always fresh. LAWRY'S VARIETY STORE, 
Half Block S. of Center Sq., Elizabethtown. 



Boggs Hardware Store 

The best there Is in hardware at the 
lowest possible prices. Prompt and cour- 
teous service. TRY US. 

D. B. KLINE 

CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



CEO. A. FISHER: 

Hardware | 

Phonographs 

And 

Records 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



ELIZABETHTOWN 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Beet Grades of 

FIXJVR AND TEED 

Highest Cash Prices paid for f;rain. 

hay and straw 

EUZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Mention Our College Tinies When Writing. 



n':;iiiiiHiiiiimiiiiiB:iiiwiiiiB!iiiaiiiii 



The Book Store 



1 BOOKS, BIBLES, SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPPLIES " 

i MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED | 

I G N. FALKENSTEIN, Eiizabethtown. Pa. I 

ii!Biiiiiaii;iaiii:wiiiai'i:iBi;iiBiiiiBiiiniiiiniiiyBiiiiiHiiBiiiiiBiniiiiiaiiiiii^^^^ 



>****** * ******************* ** * 




Seven thousand people buy WALK- 
OVER shoes every day — certainly 
there must be much merit in a shoe 
to attain such popularity — 
In addition to the better quality or 
our shoes we offer our better man- 
ner of serving you. 

WALK-OVER 
SHOE STORE 

HUNTZBERGER- WINTERS CO. 

Department Store 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'A 

♦♦■ > ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦■ >♦ » < ■*♦♦♦ < H I Ht lll> 



MIESSE'S ICE CREAM 

adds ZEST to the MEAL 

Sold in Eiizabethtown by 
J. S. GROSS. 



IpaintlnG anb paper 

IbariGing 

AMOS B. DRACE 



' I ♦■ H"l I I I n M I I » H"Hn| '*. H . 4 .. H .. | .. H .. H 

: III Spalding Sporting Goods 

Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 
', Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic 
Shoes. Kodaks and Cameras, de- 
veloping and finishing. 



H . B. HE R R 
30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



tmmm^i^m^mmt^m 



»iii H <ii »ii»iii 



Est. 1884 Est. 1884 

KIRK JOHNSON CS, CO. 

Pianos, Player-Pianos, Victrolas, Sheet Music, Musical Mdse. 
16-18 W. King Street. LANCASTER, PA. 



] 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Elizabethtown Exchange 
Bank 





Transacts a general banking business 




Pays interest on time deposits. 




Solicits your patronage. 




OFFICERS 


A. G. HEISEY, 


President. ALI.E 




J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



AU.EN A. COBLE, Vice. Pres. 



A. G. Heisey 
Allen A. Coble 
H. J. Gish 



DIRECTORS 

Jos. G. Heisey 
Dr. H. K. Blough 
Henry E. Landis 
B. Hernley 



J. H. Buch 
Dr. A. M. Kalbach 
Geo. D. Boggs 
B. H. Greider 



TAKE YOUR 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morn- 
ing. Returns Wednesday & Friday afternoon 



Ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 



Book and Job Printing 
Catalogues a Specialty 



D. G. BRINSER 



Coal 



Grain, Flour, Feed, 
Seeds, Hay, Straw 
and Fertilizer. 



311 W. Grant St., 




LANCASTER, PA, 



IIIIIIBIIIIIBIIIIIBHIIIBIilllBlllli! 



lilllBIIIIIBIIIIiaillilBllllllililBIO 



O. N. HEISEY 



I Provisions, Groceries and Choice Candies | 

i 



HEISEY BUILDING 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



o^^f/v^ 



MiS'lier Ground, 5 

Science and C'ivilization, 7 

What Poets See in Nature, 9 

Conservation of the Child, 12 

A Letter from India to the Readers of Our 

College Times, 14 

EDITORIALS, 16 

SCHOOL NOTES, 18 

Commencement Week 19 

K. L. S. Notes, 21 

Homerian News, 22 

School Teachers, 22 

Athletics, 23 

Alumni 24 

Exchanges 25 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 




Black Cat 
Hosiery 



HERTZLER'S 
Department Store 

Your needs supplied at satisfactory 
prices in Dry Goods, Groceries, Ready- 
to-Wear Clothing for Men and Women 
of all ages, Carpets, Rugs, Floar Oil- 
cloth, Shoes, etc. 

Polite attention. Square dealing. 

Guaranteed satisfaction. 
Agents for Made-to-Measure 

CLOTHING 

International Tailcring Co., N. Y. 

American Ladies Tailoring Co., Chi- 
cago. 
Up-to-Oate Samples on Hand. 

HERTZL-Z;^ B]?OS. & CO. 

Cemtre Square EliZabethtOWR, PS. 



W. S. SMITH, President. PETER N. RUTT, Vice Pres. 

AARON H. MARTIN, Cashier. 

U. S. DEPOSITORY 

Elizabethtown National Bank 

Capital, Surplus and Profits, $164,000 

General Accounts Solicited. Interest Paid on Special Deposits 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent. 



W. S. Smith 
F. W. Groff. 
B. C. Ginder 



DIRECTORS 

Elmer W. Strickler 
J. S. Risser 
AmoB G. Coble 



Peter N. Rutt 
B. L. Geyer 
E. E. Coble 



Mention Our College Times When Writing 



I BUCHANAN & YOUNG 

I 115 & 117 N. Queen St., 

1 LANCASTER, PENN'A 



Distinctive Styles 



Coats, Suits, Dresses, 
and Waists 



Whether it is a Coat, Dress or 
Waist, you are sure to find our styles 
distinctive, we mean authorative 
styles that duplicate the mode with- 
out going to the extreme, for they 
are always in good taste. 

Coats and Suits 

In Misses Suits and Coats, Spring 
heralds her coming with many charm- 
ing conceptions here, each of which 
asserts style correctness in no un- 
certain way, there is a "touch and go" 
a "smartness"— about the lines and 
new ideas that are most effective and 
becoming. 

Dresses at the Style Store 

Cool, fresh, danty Dresses with a 
stylish dash of color that gives a 
pretty finish to neck, waist and bor- 
der, distinguished, charming models 
in Silks, Lingerie Dresses now invite 
critical inspection, YOUR Inspection, 
young lady. 

Waists 

Waists that will relieve the ever- 
lasting monotony and sameness, dis- 
tinctvie, new models in smart effects 
that will become a surprisingly large 
nmber of girls who seek excluslve- 
ness of styles. 




Students Will Please Patronize Our Advertisers 



I Ip'Vi^' wv^""*»vi > i " w ^ n f**t^n f" w m ^ iy" mi^ n f»»mnnf ' ■i V^ *'*i'^ww W 



IMPORTANT ! 



STUDENTS I $ 



f^lfit m^i f '%»^ifi M^/ V '^^A^' M V^* ' »■ ^/U " ** V U " *' W " **''^/ V ' 



DO YOU KNOW THAT 

It is only because of the kind patronage of our business and 
our professional men in this town and elsewhere, that this maga- 
zine exists. They have indeed shown themselves friends of Our 
College and of "Our College Times." 

Therefore, we justly and fairly may ask you, when about to 
buy anything, to consider first those who by their advertising 
have rr.ade this magazine possible. 

We have solicited only advertisers who are reliable in all 
respects. 

Business Manager of "Our College Times." 



READ THE ADVERTISEMENTS 



Q I i^,m . «^ ^n > ■ <^ ^ ii 



--ttW 



i4fW»**^| |W i«»«^|Vw » < | / »»«* ii«^| W t i » < K ^ np y 



ininBmn'Hiiii ■yiiipiiiiaiiiiamiBNiHiiimiiiniiiiiaiiiiaiiiini i i-f-if****'*-** 
i I * 
First Showing | | Educational Papers 

OF THE NEW I | | Mage 



Fall Shoes! 

Every Style — every wanted ■ 

Leather — every new shape | 

— is here, ready for your in- | 

spection. Will you stop in | 

to see them today ? ■ 

I 

LYNCH & EBY | 

"No Shoes Over 83.00" = 

■ 
24 North Queen St, | 

LANCASTER, PENN'A I 



jazines 
and 
Teacher's Helps 

Ask for 1 9 14 List 

Sample Copies Free 

AMOS B. ROOT 

I ELIZABETHTOWN, TA. 
! i ♦t- n **»»**i 1 1 n I n 1 1 1 1 1 i n ♦♦ 



(§m (Haik^ (EmiB 



Elizabktutown, Pa., July, 1914 



Higher Ground 

Anna Cassel 



There arc times in uur lives which 
we reinemljer as mountain top expe- 
riences. The_v may be times when great 
truths have dawned upon us, or when 
we have been in the presence of good 
people, from whom we have received 
great inspiration, or perhaps we maj- 
have been, as it were, face to face with 
our Maker and permitted to have an 
insight into some spiritual mystery. 
Such experiences do not come often in 
one's life, but to each comes the oppor- 
tunity to rise to higher ground. 

When we live to the best of our 
al^ilit}-, we live on higher ground. 
People wild live on the mountains have 
longer days than those who live in the 
valleys. It is because the sun shines 
first and last on the mountain top. So, 
in our lives the shadows are in the 
\alley where we often waste our time 
and talent with the trifling and vexa- 
tious things of the world, when we 
should rise above those things to 
where the sunshine is brighter and 
lasts longer. Those who make the 
most of their lives, be their days many 
or few. will liye long in the memories 
of their friends. In order to make 
the most of life, we should be har- 
moniously developed; that is, intel- 
lectually, socially, and spiritually. 



From infancy in every normal child 
there is an innate longing for truth. 
This desire should never be crushed 
but rather fostered and stimulated. 
We need a many sided intellectual 
development for our own best interests 
and for the good that we may be able 
to do to others. Many do not have 
an opportunity to receive a higlier 
education, sometimes not even a public 
school education. Such people are in- 
deed unfortunate, but there is no 
reason why their education and intel- 
lectual development should cease when 
they are obliged to leave school. In 
our day and age when good literature 
can be had at so little cost, all may 
have the privilege of improving their 
minds and keep abreast with truth. 

The Golden Ages of Greece and 
Rome were the times when intellectual 
development was at its height. When 
ambition along intellectual lines 
waned, the downfall of the nation 
began. It is the nation which pays 
much attention to the education of its 
youth that is reckoned among the 
great nations of the world. Every one 
of us has a part in making the nation. 
The way we use our advantages for 
self-development will have its influ- 
ence indirectly upon the nation and 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



directly upon us. We should never 
be satisfied with our attainments but 
our aim should ever be, "Onward and 
Upward," to higher ground. 

We are by nature social beings. We 
long for the companionshii) of others, 
but too often we depend on others 
for our happiness. To enjoy life fully 
and to live so that our lives may tell 
for good we need social development. 
We must study human nature and the 
needs of mankind so that we may be 
able to be of service in times of need. 
There are some people who have no 
friends, no pleasures, nothing to make 
them happy and life looks very dark 
to them. They depend on others for 
their pleasure and happiness. True 
happiness comes from within and can- 
not be given to another. "Our own 
felicity we make or find" and the secret 
of living a happy life is in serving 
others. 

The world needs more optimists ; 
more people with a sunny disposition 
to drive away the shadows and the 
gloom from the lives of our fellowmen. 
Many are more hungry for love than 
for bread, and it costs so little to speak 
a loving word, or do a loving deed, or 
scatter a little sunshine. When we 
strive to keep the welfare and happi- 
ness of others uppermost in our minds, 
we begin to get a vision of the mission 
of our lives and are living on higher 
ground. 

In order to get the best out of life 
and be able to do the most good, an- 
other side of our nature must be de- 
veloped. This is the spiritual side 
which is without doubt the most impor- 
tant. To be spiritually developed we 
must let the Holy Spirit come into our 



lives. This is God's work, but man 
has his part to do. 

There is in every living soul a long- 
ing after God. The feeling is not al- 
ways recognized but in every human 
being there is an instinct to worship 
a Supreme or Higher Being. Alany 
in dark heathen lands go through life 
with an aching void in their hearts for 
something that is higher and better 
than they have known, and we with 
our higher civilization and enlighten- 
ment often cast aside the privileges of 
acquiring the best in life. We must 
first know how God's will is revealed 
in his Word and then carry it out as 
directed by the Holy Spirit. We must 
have Jesus Christ for our pattern in all 
things. From Him we learn spiritual 
development in all the Christian 
graces. He must be our Savior, who 
redeems us from our sins. He must be 
our advocate with the Father, who 
keeps us saved, and our Lord and 
King, who rules our lives. When we 
thus yield our lives to him and conse- 
crate our talents to his service we will 
know his will implicitly in all the small 
things as well as the great things 
which confront us and then only can 
we walk on higher ground. 

We should strive to do well each day 
the tasks that come before us, using to 
the greatest advantage the time and 
talent that is ours, we should aim to 
make the world a little brighter for our 
having lived in it ; and by following 
the teaching of the Savior be the light 
and salt of the earth and then we shall 
not have lived in vain. Let us press on 
in the upward way until we reach the 
higher ground in the realms above. 



Science and Civilization 

J. D. Reber. 



Science i> the vanguard of civiliza- 
tion. Alan rose no faster from his 
primitive state than he knew how to 
use artificial means to aid him. Thus 
man passed through the hunting, fish- 
ing, pastoral, agricultural, industrial 
stages intii the commercial stage as 
he ac(|iiireil tlie physical means to do 
so. Many of these means were proba- 
lily accidental discoveries. Every dis- 
covery gave to man a new idea. The 
accumulation if new ideas caused more 
intense mind activity and in time he 
acquired the ability of original think- 
ing which has not ceased. Ever since 
man has acquired the ability of original 
thinking, inventions have not ceased 
ti> multiply, and as before, every new 
in\enti m nr idea has stimulated an- 
other. 

Ciinsequently, when man felt his 
interdey^endence on man he began to 
barter with his fellow man. A ship 
\\-as needed then. A flat bottom ship 
was made and he could sail aloiig the 
cf)ast. The invention of the compass 
put more confidence and daring into 
the sailor. The flat bottom boat 
sufficed nil longer for deep sea sailing, 
hence a new type of ship was essential 
for further progress. The science of 
ship-building improved this type by 
building a ship with a keel. 

The civilized world then had a ship 
in many ways modern. Due to the in- 
creased confidence in sailing, sea men 
wandered far out into the Mediter- 
ranean and finally through the Strait 
of Gibraltar, around the Cape of Good 



Hope to India. This revolutionized 
all commercial Europe. The Mediter- 
ranean sea ports now lost their promi- 
nence as trade centers, and the center 
of trade shifted to the western coast 
of Europe. This did away with the 
caravan routes between the East and 
the West. Trade was reduced so much 
that the nautical property of nearly 
all the cities fell fiity per cent. These 
results can be traced back to the in- 
vention of the compass. It is thus seen 
that while science is a benefactor it is 
also a malefactor as well. 

During the middle ages civilization 
relapsed into barbarism with a return, 
however, to nature, a movement which 
culminated in the French Revolution 
for Independence. Science was com- 
ing to the front all this time, influenced 
by Bacon and others, and was also 
causing many industrial revolutions. 

The invention of the steam engine 
by James Watt, in 1763 was the direct 
cause of the great famine in Hindustan 
and an indirect cause of the American 
Civil War. Steam power introduced 
into England, favored by other circum- 
stances, caused factories to be estab- 
lished there. England relied upon 
India for her raw products and thus 
took away all raw goods and left the 
Indian manufacturer to starve. 

Steam power was an incentive 
to .American agriculture, and especial- 
ly conducive to ginning cotton and 
thus promulgating slave labor, and 
consequently the Civil War. 

The phvsical sciences are the mother 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



of our social sciences. Through the 
influence of these sciences and their 
application, man was brough into clos- 
er relations. The compass and the sail- 
ing vessel brought men together from 
remote lands, and allowed them to ex- 
change commodities and ideas. The 
discovery of steam power led to the 
concentration of industries and, conse- 
quently, men were massed together in 
towns and cities. 

This new kind of environment and 
life led immediately to new social 
problems from which sprung our 
social, economic, and political sciences. 
It also led to Darwinism, and its 
probable misinterpretation, scepticism. 
Man has changed very little physically 
since the time of authentic history, but 
subjectively speaking, he is an entirely 
new creature. At the time of creation 
man was in God's own image bodily; 
mentally man was little better than a 
brute. Science opened the way, the 
gate of heaven, and now man is ap- 
proximating God's ideal. 

One of the latest contributions of 
great importance is the Bessemer pro- 
cess, a process of converting iron ore 
into steel in one smelting process. This 
process made at once cheaper and 
more durable steel. Under the old 
process steel sold as high as one 
hundred and twenty dollars per ton. 
Steam boilers of steel carry a pressure 
of more than two hundred and fifty 
pounds to each square inch of surface, 
about four times as great as in the iron 
boilers ^ised formerly. Locomotives 
weighing from loo to 350 tons are now 
used instead of the 30 ton locomotive. 
Thus, tonnage, mileage, and speed 
have been increased greatly in com- 
paratively .short time. Owing to these 



improvements the farmer of Minne- 
sota, the planter of Louisiana, and the 
miner of Colorado, and the factory 
operator of Massachusetts, have each 
the same comforts of living that are 
application, man was brought into clos- 
them at scarcely more than half the 
cost of fifty years ago. 

Cheaper steel has been substituted 
for wood as a building material. All 
modern buildings over six stories high 
are built with a steel frame. A steel 
framed building of twenty-five stories 
has greater stability than a brick or 
stone building of six stories. Such a 
structure as the Flatiron Building in 
New York would have been impossible 
without cheap steel. 

Ocean liners, also are built from ten 
to twelve times the size of former 
liners. The time for crossing the Atlan- 
tic has been reduced since the time of 
Columbus from three months to six 
or seven days. 

Such great changes in our commer- 
cial system, requires the constant en- 
action of new laws and thus science is 
slowly changing our government and 
shapes to a great extent its destiny. 
Not only does an invention or discov- 
ery change the economic conditions of 
the nation in which it originated but 
all the civilized nations of the globe. 

Years ago the problem in the com- 
mercial world was: how to utilize the 
raw products. Now the question is 
slowly growing upon us : how to get 
the raw products, both for direct con- 
sumption and for manufacture. This 
has given rise to a large number of 
agricultural schools, and the develop- 
ment of agricultural science. 

A notable step of progress along this 
line was made some years ago in Ger- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



many when it was discovered that su- 
yar could he made from the sugar 
heel. This ^ave rise to a great indus- 
try in C.ermany. Before that time, 
Germany imported all her sugar from 
the West Indies. This was the chief 
money crop of these islands. When 
German}- hegan to produce her own 
sugar she ceased to import cane sugar 



and even supplied a part of Western 
Europe. The market for cane sugar 
decreased suddenly and the sugar 
growers could no longer pay their tax- 
es to Spain. Spain insisted on her 
usual income and a rebellion resulted, 
and by the intervention of the United 
States we had the Spanish-American 
War. Here again science blessed one 
people and caused another to suffer. 



What Poets See in Nature 

I. J. Kreider. 



In this discussion we shall not only 
consider what we may see in nature 
but also what men of the past have 
seen. By such a course I hope we 
may be better enabled to see more of 
the hidden powers in nature. The 
best authorities whom we shall consid- 
er are some of our poets. 

In looking over the early pages of 
mir literature we find different forces 
at work, which inspired our early writ- 
ers to give expression to their thoughts 
in prose and poetry. In the Anglo- 
Norman period we find heroism as the 
underlying stimulus. And coming 
down through the age of Chaucer, we 
notice the growing intense interest in 
the political and social movements and 
the growing discontent between lu^x- 
ury and poverty, between the idle 
wealthy class and the overtaxed peas- 
ants. Proceeding to the Elizabethan 
age we have religious tolerance and 
strife together with social contentnient 
and great enthusiasm along the line of 
discover}-. Literature also in this age 
turned instinctivelv. Then we come to 



the greatest moral and political reform 
which ever swept over a nation in the 
short space of half a century, known 
as Puritanism. In this age comes 
Milton who, besides many other poems, 
wrote what may rightly be classed 
as the earliest great nature poems. 
They are his twin poems, "L' Allegro" 
and "H'Penseroso." Both of these 
contain beautiful descriptive passages 
on Nature. In the former of these 
poems, the air is sweet ; birds are sing- 
ing; manifold sights, sounds, and 
fragrances fill the senses ; and to this 
appeal of nature the soul of man re- 
sponds by being happy, seeing in every 
flower and hearing in every harmony 
some exquisite symbol of human life. 
In "11 Penseroso" we have a quiet 
thoughtfulness which sounds the 
depths of human emotion in the pres- 
ence of nature. 

It is this kind of poetry, however, 
that appealed mostly to the people at 
large and was not artificial enough 
for the courtly type. Therefore, this 
period led from the Puritan Age 



10 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



to the Classical Age. This age is rep- 
resented by men like Pope and Dryden 
who were dissatisfied with the spirit 
of romanticism and, therefore, wrote 
literature according to rules handed to 
them by the French. Their literature 
is noted for its polish and wit but is 
artificial throughout ; it lacks fine feel- 
ing ; it looks upon life critically. Writ- 
ers strove to repress all emotions and 
enthusiasm. In a word everything 
had to be written according to some 
fixed rule which was almost similar to 
the laws of the Medes and Persians. 

But as Tennyson writes: 
"The old order changeth, yieldin place 

to new; 
.\nd God fulfills Himself in many 

ways, 
Lest one good custom should corrupt 

the world." 

So God, who is the creator of all 
nature, opened the senses of his people 
that they might perceive the wondrous 
powers hidden in nature. As a result 
poets soon became tired of the dry 
and artificial poetry of the classicists 
and thus turned away from court life, 
from club rooms, from drawing rooms, 
from the social and political life of 
London and gave nature a chance to 
create in them a more romantic spirit. 
That is, they turned away from the 
bondage of rule and custom and turn- 
ed to nature and to plain humanity for 
their material. In this romantic 
movement where the powers underly- 
ing all nature were directing the poets, 
we have almost all the poetry mark- 
ed with human sympathy, and the 
imagination was left to play its part 
truly realizing that the dreamer lives 
forever, but the toiler dies in a day. 
It is furthermore characterized in that 
it is not given lo the intellect or to 



science to unlock the treasures of the 
human heart but rather to the touch 
of sympathetic nature; and things that 
are hidden from the wise and prudent 
are revealed to babes. Pope for in- 
stance had no appreciable humanity ; 
Addison delighted in polite society, 
but had no message for plain people. 
May I ask at this moment how many 
of the English classists had a mes- 
sage for plain people? Abraham Lin- 
coln saj's : "'God must have loved the 
plain people or else he would not have 
made so many of them." Just as soon, 
however, as the poets began to write 
as God through nature and plain hu- 
manity revealed beauty to them, they 
brought about a great revival. They 
sympathized with the poor and they 
stooped low enough to hear the cry 
against oppression. This sympathy 
and this cry grew stronger and strong- 
er until it culminated in Robert Burns 
who, more than any other writer in any 
language, is the poet of the unlettered 
human heart. 

These are but a few characteristics 
of the writers who deemed it wise to 
express their thoughts as nature and 
simplicity prompted. Let us consider 
a few of these poets. Thomas Gray, 
in the first place took nature as a back- 
ground for painting human emotions 
and expressing human sympathy. 
\\'hile reading his poetry one feels as 
though he were in a somber atmos- 
phere. May we notice a stanza from a 
poem full of gentle melancholy, and 
one that tven excels "L'.\llegro" with 
its beauty and suggestiveness. 

"The curfew tolls the knell of parting 
and to me." 
The lowing herd winds sl')wly o'er 
the lea; 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



11 



Tlic plowman homeward plods his 
weary way, 

And leaves the world to darkness 
and to me. 

\Vc shall now make a comparison 
between Addison, a classicist, and 
Gray, a numanticist. Both men at dif- 
ferent times traveled across the con- 
tinent : both crossed the Alps. Addi- 
son crossed on a lovely summer day 
and in his record of the impressions 
on his foreign travel he wrote: "A very 
troublesome journej^ — you cannot im- 
agine how I am pleased with the sights 
of a plain." Gray crossed the Alps in 
the beginning of winter wrapped in 
niufifs. hoods, and caps of beaver, fur 
boots and bearskins, but wrote ecstat- 
ically: "Not a precipice, not a torrent 
not a cliff but is pregnant with r«- 
ligion and poetry." 

Goldsmith looked upon Nature as 
beautiful. He looked upon it from an 
optimistic viewpoint while Cowper 
looked upon the sensitive side of 
nature. In his later works he proves 
himself a worthy predecessor of Burns, 
whose poetic creed may be summed 
u[) in one of his own stanzas: 

"Give me a spark of Nature's fire, 
That's a' the learning I desire: 

Then, though I trudge thro' dub an' 
mire at pleugh or cart. 
My Muse, though homely in attire. 

May touch the heart." 

Among bis nature poems, ''To a 
Mouse" and "To a Mountain Daisy," 
are the best, and suggest the poeti- 
cal possibilities that daily pass un- 
noticed under our feet. 

To Blake all nature was a vast 
spiritual symbolism in which he saw 
elves, fairies, devils, angels, — all look- 
ing at him in friendship or enmity 
through the eyes of flowers and stars. 



This curious pantheistic conception 
was the very essence of Blake's life 
and in the face of discouragement and 
failure he went on singing cheerfully 
and working patiently. 

In the writings of these poets just 
mentioned we notice a great liberal- 
ism in literature, the essence of which 
was that all literature must reflect 
all that is spontaneous and unaffected 
in nature and in man, and be free to 
follow its own fancy in its own way. 

However, the climax of nature 
poetry was not reached until the close 
of the eighteenth century and the be- 
ginning of the nineteenth, during 
which period we have the greatest 
nature poets known : Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats. 

In Coleridge we have a man of grief 
w-ho made the world happy. He al- 
ways had a cheering message full of 
beauty, hope, and inspiration. He did 
not permit his imagination to run wild 
as did Blake and others, but bridled 
it with thought and study as may be 
seen in "Kubla Khan," and "The 
Rime of the Ancient Mariner." The 
last is one of the world's masterpieces 
and his suggestions of the lonely sea 
have never been equalled. 

In Wordsworth, literary independ- 
ence led him to the heart of common 
things. Following his own instinct, he 
too 

"Finds tongues in trees, books in the 
running brooks. 

Sermons in stones, and good in every- 
thing." 

And so more than any other 
writer of all ages he fills the 
common life of nature and the 
souls of common men and women 
with glorious significance. Treasure 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



his name in your memory as the great- 
est nature poet that any age has pro- 
duced. He is as sensitive as a barome- 
ter to every subtle change in the world 
about him. There is hardly a sight 
from a violet to a mountain or a 
sound from a bird note to the thunder 
of a cataract that is not reflected in 
some beautiful way in Wordsworth's 
poetry. He is true to nature. He 
gives you the bird, the flower, the 
wind, the tree, and the river just as 
they are, and lets them speak their 
own message. 

Nothing is ugly or commonplace 
in his world. Even in his childhood 
Wordsworth regarded natural objects, 
the streams, the hills, the flowers, and 
the wind as his companions. He says 
that the best part of our life is shown 
to be the result of natural influences. 
According to his view, society and the 
crowded unnatural life of cities tends 
to weaken and pervert humanity. He 
also claims that a return to natural 
and simple living is the only remedy 
for human wretchedness. He sees 
nature transfused and illuminated by 
Spirit. We shall never understand the 



emotions aroused by a flower or a sun- 
set until we learn that nature appeals 
thniugh the eye of man to his inner 
spirit. 

Thus we see how some of the poets 
looked upon Nature. May we at this 
point notice what the teacher of all 
teachers saw in nature when he said, 
"Behold the lilies of the field' or in 
that expression, "If God so clothed 
the grass of the fields." Whose are 
these flowers or to whom does the 
grass belong? \\'hat do we see when 
we look at nature in her various 
forms? Does our heart leap up when 
we behold a rainbow in the sky? Can 
we feel some personal living Spirit 
meeting and accompanying us as we 
walk through the wo ds and fields? 
Do the birds, the flowers, the winds, 
and the trees speak a message to us? 
Do we look upon things in nature as 
unsightly and commonplace? May 
we say with Horace Smith : 
"Were I in churchless solitude remain- 
ing. 

Far from the voices of teachers and 
divines. 
My soul would find, in flowers of 
God's ordaining, 

Priests, sermons, .shrines." 



Conservation of the Child 

Ruth Landis 



When we speak of conservation, 
whether it be of raw material or of 
precious human beings, it requires not 
the ability to put the seen above the 
unseen, but the ability to set the un- 
seen above the seen. This c|uestion of 
the conservation of the child is the 



crowning glory of our day, since our 
nation has become keenly alive to the 
necessity of conservation, not only of 
our natural resources but also of our 
childhood. Every generation calls for 
more intense conservation, and a bet- 
ter equipped race of human lieings. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



13 



if we desire to maintain our standards 
in the face of constantly growing ac- 
tivities. 

Then, too, there never was an age 
when we were better equipped to pay 
the enormous cost of the necessary 
conservation. There were times when 
people of the world faced what is 
known as a social deficit. There was 
not enough in the world to go around ; 
there was not enough food to feed the 
great number of people. Then the 
plagues came as a blessing to the great 
upper class, for through the horrible 
plagues many thousands of the com- 
mon people were wiped out, thus re- 
ducing the number of people greatly 
and thus lessening the drain upon the 
food supply. But our day, on the con- 
trary, faces a social surplus. There 
is more than necessary to sustain life, 
more than enough to provide com- 
fortably for all. And in addition to 
this we have awakened to the fact that 
much of the degeneracy is due to our 
not putting the unseen above the seen 
and not realizing the responsibility of 
protecting the children from the many 
snares set to entrap them. To-day we 
have the knowledge, that it is our duty 
to work for the conservation of our 
morals, our piinds, and our human 
beings, especially our childhood, for 
the generations to come. 

Never in all the ages have we been 
as conscious of our growing strength 
as we are to-day. The workman in 
the shop, the business man, in fact 
men and women in any profession 



whatsoever, must be trained and 
schooled in their workmanship that 
they may be able to make their pro- 
fession worth more and more as time 
goes on. Does this not tell us that 
the demand for still better service is 
and will be demanded of our child- 
hood? Yes. No one can dispute the 
fact that as time moves on more will 
be rejuired of our youth than ever 
before. 

How necessary is it then that we 
take the proper attitude and bend all 
our energies to the preserving or con- 
servation of the child, for on him rests 
a great responsibility. "The child of 
to-day is the child of to-morrow." It 
is our duty then as American people, 
living in so grand and peerless a na- 
tion, to con^erve our childhood and 
make our men of to-morrow an honor 
to us and to our country as well. We 
are under obligations to take away 
from them the snares of our licensed 
liquor traffic, to wipe out the awful 
white slave traffic and other immorali- 
ties which are so detrimental to our 
childhood. 

May we give the child a chance to 
go through life with lut being a slave 
to these vices. The only way to do 
this is to remove these evils and by so 
doing preserve the purity and' love- 
liness o{ our childhood. We have the 
means, the intellect, and the power to 
make the man of to-morrow what we 
wish him to be. Then, why shall we 
not do it ? 



A Letter from India to the Readers of Our Col- 
lege Times 

Kathryn Ziegler, Auburn Villa, Panchgani, India. 



May 8, 1914. 

For a few days past I felt as it I 
wanted to talk to my friends scattered 
far and wide. 

Besides other messages I receive 
from the home land, I receive one big 
letter (Our College Times) once a 
month. I find only one fault with it 
and that is, I get to the end too soon. 
To read about those I learned to know 
in days gone by. is like renewing ac- 
quaintances. 

You will notice a new address at the 
head of my letter. I came here on the 
seventh of April for a few months' 
vacation. Even the most healthy feel 
the need of a change after some years 
of service in this land. At present at 
Ankleshwar, my home, the heat is in- 
tense.. The thermometer registers 
no, and some days more. 

Panchgani is a beautiful place, four 
thousand feet above sea level, about 
two hundred and fifty miles from 
Bombay. Twenty-nine miles of the 
journey was made by a conveyance. 

^\'e arrived at our cottage (Auburn 
yU\a) at one n'clock. Mr. and Mrs. 
P.Iough and I occujjy the cottage. We 
are quite comfortalile since the fleas 
and the bugs liavc taken their depar- 
ture. 

There arc between fifty and seventy- 
five cottages here, three High Schools 
and a Convent, Due Girls' School, two 
Roys' Schools, and one for Parsees. 



A number of ^Missionaries' children 
are here at school. 

Every body is working hard here to 
make all the money they can. Every- 
thing is brought to your door. The 
cloth merchant picks up what he can 
carry and comes. The tailor brings 
goods prepared to take an order. The 
shoemaker brings the diliferent kinds 
of leather and wants an order. He 
comes real often to see if you need 
new shoes. The venders of vegetables 
fill their baskets, and last but not least, 
and best of all and the most welcome 
here, is the strawberry man. He is 
the first one to appear every morning 
and he always finds sale. Berries are 
delicious and cheap. For ten or twelve 
cents we get all we want for us three. 

The vegetables and berries are raised 
nine miles from here and are all carried 
by men and women. 

I would say here that eleven miles 
fnim here at a point five hundred feet 
higher than this, is where Miss B. 
Mary Rover is at present. The Mar- 
athi language school she is attending, 
went to this place for a few months. 
We spent a day with them, and they 
also came to see us. Miss Rover is 
well and very happy and enjoys the 
language study. What a joy to have 
her in India ! 

I consider this vacation here as a 
great privilege and hope to gain more 
strength so T can do better service for 
the Master. 



OUR COLLEGE TLMES 



I hope to return to my station where 
my work is and where my heart is, the 
second week in June, — about the time 
of Commencement. How I long to he 
at my College home once more ! 

My prayers and my interests are 
with each one whether at school or out 
in the different callings in life. I wish 



each one, all that is good and true and 
noble. 

The Lord help us ever to remember 
the spiritual and devoted teachers who 
instructed us. May their spirituality 
flovv through us to others who are 
about us. 



Resolutions of Sympathy. 

Whereas, God in his all-wise provi- 
dence has called Frank L. Reber, 
brother of our President Dr. D. C. 
Reber, in the prime of life from his 
earthly career to continue his life in 
the eternal realms, be it. 

Resolved, That we, the Faculty and 
the Students of Elizabethtown College 
do hereby express our deepest sym- 
pathies to Dr. D. C. Reber and the 
bereaved family, and that we commend 
them to the Lord who gave and who 
hath taken away, be it 



Resolved, That a copy of these reso- 
lutions be sent to Dr. Reber, and the 
sorrowing family, and that a copy of 
the same be printed in each of the 
town papers. 

J. G. Meyer, 
J. S. Harley, 
Mary Hershey, 
Committee. 

Similar resolutions were passed by 
the Alumni Association at their public 
meeting on Wednesday evening. 





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EDITORIAL BOARD 

RALPH W. SCHLOSSER, Editor-in Chief 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 



Mary G. Hershey... 
Robert J. Ziegler 

Nora L. Reber 

Naomi Longenecker. 



.School Nbtes 



.Homerlan News 
. ..K. L. S. News 



J. D. Reber Alumni Notes 

Isaac J. Kreider Excnanges 

J. H. Gingrich Business Manager 

Daisy P. Rider Art Editor 



C. J. Rose, Athletics 



Our College Times is published monthly during the Academic year by Elizabethtown 

College. 
This paper will be sent continuously to old subscribers, so as not to break their files, 

and arrearages charged, unless notice to discontinue has been received at expiration. 
Report any change of address to the Business Manager. 

Subscription rates: — Fifty cents per year; ten cents per copy; five years for $2 00 
seoond-class matter April 19, 1909, at the Elizabethtown Postoffice. 



The Last Word. 

W'c have now completed another vol- 
ume of Our College Times and arc 
are now about ready to lay down the 
editor's quill. Thi.s brings to us a 
mingled sense of pain and pleasure. 
For the work of Editor-in-Chief has 
been fraught with many cares and 
burdens as well as with many joys and 
delights.. We have at all times tried 
to make Our College Times typical of 
the atmosphere of Elizabethtown Col- 
lege and to afford tlie readers of the 



paper what might be of the greatest 
interest. 

We desire to express our apprecia- 
tion to the As.scociate Editors who 
have labored so faithfully in writing 
up notes for their respective depart- 
ments. We feel that much of the credit 
received from various persons con- 
csrning the good news in the paper 
in the different departments belongs to 
these editors. And we would not be 
unmindful of the large number of stu- 
dents who furnished so manv articles 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



17 



l(ir the Literary department. This de- 
jjartmcnt is what has given dignity to 
niir ])aper among the other college 
magazines.. We hope that in the com- 
ing years this phase of college journal- 
ism will not be neglected in Our Col- 
lege Times, as well as in other school 
papers. 

Another feature in the success of 
Our College Times is the willingness 
of merchants and professional men to 
advertise in our columns. Were it not 
for this kindness, Our Coll-^ge Times 
could not be published. A large num- 
ber of our students and alumni are 
subscribers to the paper and thus also 
aid the paper financially. We should 
like to see every alumnus a subscriber 
to the paper and an active worker in 
the interests of the school in his com- 
munity. We also feel like commend- 
ing our printer, Mr. L A. Shiffer, for 
his prompt service and artistic work 
on Our College Times. One exchange 
says, "Our College Times is a delight 
to the eve." 



Now a few words concerning the 
editor for next year. On account of 
other pressing duties we shall have to 
hand over the Editorship to another 
member of the faculty. The trustees 
(if the College have decided that the 
paper shall be under the supervision of 
Professor Jacob S. Harley during the 
year 1914— 1915. We feel that Profes- 
sor Harley is well qualified for this 
position and we bespeak for him an 
enjoyable year in editing Our College 
Times. We hope his staff of asso- 
ciates will prove to be helpful in repre- 
senting their departments with the 
best possible material. 

During the past two years we have 
tried to set an idea before us of what 
a college paper ought to be, but we 
feel that we have not realized in every 
particular what we desired, and it is 
our hope that the paper during the 
coming year will continue to approach 
the ideal college publication. Our 
best wishes for success attend the new 
Editor-in-Chief and his staff. 




5 



^0 







t 



'^ 



We are about to leave College Hill. 
What has this year meant to us? Have 
we made a success? Have we received 
good grades in our class work? If 
not, why not? We hope we can look 
back upon this year's work as a series 
of opportunities seized at the proper 
time and put to the best use. But if 
we have taken advantage only of the 
academic advantages, if we have done 
nothing but studied our lessons well, 
this year has been a failure. It is not 
only knowledge that we are striving 
after, but friends, ideals, and character. 
Fellow student has your standard of 
life been raised? Have you secured 
broader and clearer visions of life? 

How then are you going to repay 
the school for what it has done for 
you? What are you going to do to 
show your .\lma Mater that you appre- 
ciate her efforts? You can partly re- 
pay her by speaking a good word for 
Elizabethtown whenever you can.. 
Live out the ideals you have attained 
here. Be pure, be honest, be noble, 
and you will >how to the world that 
Elizabethtown College develops the 



whole man. 

The members of the Public Speak- 
ing class have been entertaining us 
lately in the Chapel. Each one had 
their selections well in hand and de- 
livered them very credibly. 

Professor: "Mr. Qraham. what is. 
the volume of a square?" 

Mr. Graham: "The length times the 
width times the thickness." 

On Friday, May 22, the botany class 
made their annual trip to Mt. Gretna. 
The trip proved interesting and en- 
joyable to all. Miss Esther Falken- 
stein had the misfortune to miss the 
train and accordingly arrived in time 
to return h()me. 

Professor Harley, having given out 
his age appro.ximately, was asked :"And 
how did you manage that you did not 
get married?" 

"Well," he said, looking very wise, 
"I watched myself." 

The Senior Social was a grand suc- 
cess. The Seniors had it well planned 
and so everything went off smoothly. 
Each person was given a slip of paper 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



19 



with the name of a, flower on it, much 
to the delight of some of those pres- 
ent. Among the prominent speakers 
of the evening were Misses Myer, 
Stauiifer, Kline, Miller, Falkenstein, 
Landis, and Mr. Kreider. 

Ascension Day was celebrated in 
various ways by the students. In the 
afternoon, Mr. Kreider headed a num- 
ber of the boys on a "hike" to Cone- 
vvago. Here they enjoyed a swim in 
the creek. This trip was to be a hike, 
but the strangest thing about it is, that 
some "hiked" back on the train. The 
ladies, headed by Miss Kline, did not 
attempt so long a journey but were 
satisfied in. reaching Olweiler's woods. 
For further details inquire of Misses 
Kline or Shelly. 

Mr. Kreider: "We will soon all be 
flying. You can get an airship for less 
than $15. 

Mr. Wise: "Yes, but it's not the air- 
ship that cos.ts, it's the funeral." 

The Art social on June 2 was en- 
joyed by all. We all appreciated the 
displa}' of work done by the students. 
This is the first year of this depart- 
ment's work and we feel that it has 
been a wise addition to the school. It 
has thrived under the direction of 
Miss Landis and she deserves much 
■credit for her efiorts in working up this 
department. There is a great deal 
more pleasure to be derived from life 
if one is able to see the aesthetic side 
of life. 

Mr. Zng: "Samuel Clemens wrote 
Mark Twain. " 

Professor Ober gave an address be- 
fore the W. C. T. U. Institute, on 
Saturday evening, May 23. On Thurs- 
■da\' evening. May 28 he gave a 



Temperance address at Palmj'ra. 

Professor Schlosser attended a love- 
feast at Price's in Franklin county on 
Saturday, June 6. On the morning of 
June 7 he preached a sermon in 
Waynesboro. 

COMMENCEMENT WEEK 

The Science Program. 

The first number on the Commence- 
ment Calendar this year was the public 
pi-ogram rendered by the department 
of Physical Science. Many interesting 
and practical experiments were per- 
formed by the students. The experi- 
ments were shown with an aim to in- 
terest the public school teacher in 
showing to the boys and girls all about 
the wonders of the fairyland of sci- 
ence, as well as to show the 
fundamental principles of science in 
some of the ordinary phenomena ob- 
served in our everyday life. 

Baccalaureate Sermon. 

On Sunday evening, June 7, the an- 
nual sermon to the graduating class 
was preached in the College Chapel 
by Elder S. H. Hertzler of Elizabeth- 
town. The sermon was preceded by 
an instructive Christian Workers' 
Meeting and an inspiring song service. 

The graduating class marched into 
the College Chapel at half-past seven. 
The service was opened by Eld. D. C. 
Reber, president of the College, with 
the reading of the twent3'-third Psalm 
and the offering of a fervent prayer. 

Elder ..Hertzler selected as a text: 
"Be sober: be vigilant." He brought 
out many rich truths on soberness and 
vigilance. .A few of the aphorisms 



20 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



gleaned from his sermon follow: 

"Every Christian ought to be sober. 
Too many people pass judgment with- 
out investigating. Do not lose your 
head. It is hard to keep your head 
when the provocation comes. It is a 
splendid thing to have the right kind of 
a temper. Too many act on the first 
impulse. Do not depend on your feel- 
ings but on your judgment. It is pos- 
sible to control your temper. It may 
be controlled by becoming a child of 
God. It pays under all circumstances 
to keen cool. Young men should sug- 
gest and not dictate. We should al- 
ways do the right thing whether we 
receive the credit or not. By our own 
wills we can get comparative control 
of our tempers. By our own wills and 
the grace of God, we can get absolute 
control." 

Music Program. 

On Monday evening, June 8, the 
music department of Elizabethtown 
College rendered an excellent program 
partly in-doors and partly out-doors. 
The program was begun on the campus 
in front of .-Mpha Hall and several num- 
bers had been rendered when a thunder 
storm put an end to the program out- 
doors. The audience repaired at once 
to Music Hall where the remainder 
(if the program was rendered. The 
performers acquitted themselves well 
and Mr. Hershey deserves special 
nientiim for the solo "The Tempest." 
The music department deserves credit 
for the high grade program rendered 
in spite of the confusion of the evening. 
An appreciative audience listened to 
the program of twenty numbers. 



Commercial Program. 
The graduating exercises of the 
Commercial Department were well 
attended and an excellent program was 
given. There were eight graduates in 
this department of the school. Of all 
the good nuriibers on the program, the 
essay on "Appetite" by Linda Huber, 
and the oration by Owen Hershey de- 
served special mention. The room was- 
iirtistically decorated with honeysuck- 
les and class pennants. The music for 
the evening was rendered in an accept- 
able manner. 

Class Day. 

The class of 1914 rendered a good 
class day program, on Wednesday 
afternoon, June 10. The following 
program was rendered : 

President's address. 

Music. 

Class History — Edna Brubaker. 

Declamation — Robert Becker. 

Class Prophecy — Henry B. Brandt. 

Optimist— Stella Risser. 

Pessimist— Frank Wise. 

Class Poem — Bessie Horst. 

Class Will— Sara Replogle. 

Class Song. 

.Alumni Public Meeting. 
On Wednesday evening. June 10 
was rendered one of the best public 
programs ever given by the .\lumni 
.\ssociation. Miss Florence Miller of 
Ephrata, Pa., gave an interesting reci- 
tation ; Mrs. W. E. Glasmire presen- 
ted statistics of the Alumni of Eliza- 
bethtown College that gave us a new- 
impression of the .A.lumni of our 
school. Mr. E. G. Diehm then favor- 
ed the audiencce with an inspiring 
oration on "The World State." His- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



21 



speech was an urgent appeal for inter- 
national peace. Mr. A. G. Hottenstein 
of Dubois, Pa., gave the address on 
this occasion, on the subject of 
"Ideals." Mr. Hottenstein forcefully 
presented the need of striving after 
high ideals. 

We feel that everybody was well 
repaid for attending this program. 

Commencement Day. 

The Commencement exercises at the 
College marking the close of the school 
year 1913— 14, were held in the Chapel 
on Thursday morning, June 11, at 9 
a. m. 

The following program was render- 
ed : 

Prayer, W. H. Holsinger. 
Anthem — Cast Thy Burden on the 

Lord, Gabriel. 
Oration — Universal Compensation, 

Edna Brubaker. 
Oration — Desecration of the Sabbath, 

Lilian Becker. 
Girls' Glee Club— Cradle Song, Norri:,; 

Absent, Metcalf-Lynes. 
Oration — Work and Efficiency, John 

Kuhns. 
Boys' Glee Club— Selected. 
Oration — Stars of the First Magnitude, 

Sara Replogle. 
Oration— The Social Crisis, J. D. Re- 

ber 
Chorus — Hallelujah, Peace. 
Presentation of Diplomas, D. C. Reber, 

Pd. D. 

This ended the work of the year. 

School will open again on Septem- 
ber 7, 1914. A summer school will 
be held for six weeks this summer. 
For further information apply to Dr. 
n. C. Reber. 



K. L. S. Notes. 

The Keystone Literary Society ren- 
dered a Literary program on May 15, 
the first feature oi which was a Quar- 
tette entitled "Cover Them Over." .An 
interesting talk was then given by 
Professor Harley. We should like to 
hear him soon again. Ryntha Shelly 
then recited "In the Defense of the 
Christian Sunday," after which Lila 
Shimp gave a vocal solo. Arthur Burk- 
hart then gave a humorous soliloquy 
entitled "Sam's Letter." A beautiful 
selection entitled, "What do we Plant 
^^'hen we Plant a Tree?'' was recited 
by Roberta Freymeyer.. Sara Olweil- 
er then sang a solo after which Arthur 
Miller gave a declamation entitled 
"True Success." The Literary Echo 
was then read by George Capetanios. 

The program of May 22 was a pro- 
gram on "Birds." The first feature 
was an essay telling of the "Peculiar 
Habits of Birds," by Grace Moyer. 
"The Raven" was then recited in a 
very pleasing manner by Owen Her- 
shey. Lila Shimp then gave an instru- 
mental solo entitled "The Birds and 
the Brook." The question, Resolved, 
That flowers add more to our happi- 
ness than birds, was discussed affirma- 
tively by Paul Hess and Mary Her- 
shey ; negatively, by Ephraim Hertz- 
ler and Mabel Weaver. The discus- 
sions were very interesting. A quar- 
tette then sang "Last Xight the Night- 
ingale Woke Me." 

The last program of the year was 
given on May 29. It was opened with 
a piano solo by Paul Engle. Ryntha 
Shelly then read an essay on "Push." 
Reuben Ziegler gave b (declamation 
after which the society sang "Amer- 
ica." The question. Resolved. That 



22 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



the United States should declare war 
against Mexico was discussed. The 
affirmative speakers were: Ella Heis- 
tand and John Graham ; the negative, 
Sara Shisler and Clarence Musselman. 
The debate was very interesting and 
instructive. A beautiful poem entitled 
■'Roses" was recited by Sara Olweiler. 
Bertha Perry then sang a solo which 
was greatly appreciated. After this 
the Literary Ech was read by the edi- 
tor, George Capetanious. 

The officers for next year have been 
the Literary Eccho was read by the 
editor. George Capetanios. 

Books Added to the Library for the 
Year 1913— '14. 

Senior class of 1913 — 6 volumes of 
history. 

State Librarian — -25 volumes. 

\\'. W. Greist— 14 volumes. 

Congressional Librarian — 43 vol- 
umes. 

Senior class of 1914 — 16 volumes 
Outlook bound. 

George C. Neft— 4 volumes of fiction. 

Mrs. W'.E. Glassmire — 5 volumes of 
music. 

Macmillan Co. — 5 volumes. 

R. F. Waltz— 6 volumes 

J. S. Lineaweaver — 3 volumes litera- 
ture. 

H. H. Nye — 3 volumes history.. 

Book room — 17 volumes. 

L N. S. Will— 21 volumes on S. S. 
lessons. 

Miscellaneous — 11 volumes. 

Library Fund— 90 volumes litera- 
ture, history, music, education, etc. 

Magazines bound — 25 volumes. 

Educational Review — 9 volumes. 

Missionary Review of the World — 1 
volume. 



Popular Science Monthly — 3 vol- 
umes. 

Atlantic Monthly— 2 volumes. 

Review of Reviews— 2 volumes. 

Record of Christian Work — 2 vol- 
umes. 

Gospel Messenger — 6 volumes. 

Total for the jear, 291 volumes. 

Homerian News. 

The last and best program of the 
year was rendered June 5. 

Throughout the year we were cen- 
sured for having rather dry programs. 
This one, however, changed from the 
usual philosophical air to considerable 
humor. 

The first feature of the program was 
a vocal trio, sung by Katherine Miller, 
Carrie Dennis and Nora Reber. Laura 
Landis recited in a pleasing manner a 
recitation entitled"Hepzibah's Poetry." 
The next number was a new feature 
and proved quite a success. Nora 
Reber and Lilian Falkenstein gave a 
colloquy. They related quite a num- 
ber of incidents pertaining to the past 
history of Elizabethtown College. The 
extempore speech was given by Pro- 
fessor R. W. Schlosser. He spoke on 
the subject "What would you do if 
3-ou had nothing to do?" The instru- 
mental solo was played by Mary E. 
Miller. The concluding feature was 
the Speaker's address. 

School Teachers 

The following of our students 
have received schools for the coming 
winter : 

Ella Heistand, Helen Springer, 
Mabel Weaver, Ada Douty, Sara Shis- 
ler, StaufTer Heistand, Calvin Sheetz, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES 



23 



Reuben Ziegler, David Markey,, Laban 
VVenger, Ezra Wenger, Elizabeth R. 
Miller, Harry D. Moyer, Abba Baugh- 
er, Robert Ziegler, Garfield Shearer, 
Elizabeth Engle, Martha Mathiot, 
Dora Good, Anna Brubaker, Edna 
Briiliaker, Lilian Becker. 

Athletics. 

Since the last issue of our college 
paper, there has been a decided change 
in baseball. Tennis has been slightly 
neglected, as a whole, and a great deal 
of interest and enthusiasm has been 
added to baseball interests. 

On May 4, there was a game played 
in which A. L. Reber featured by his 
pitching and batting. He had three 
two-base hits, brought in six runs and 
scored five runs himself. The follow- 
ing is the line-up and score of the two 
teams: 

Reberites 

Sheetz, 2b. 

Musselman, p., c. 

Herr, c, p. 

Royer, cf. 

Kreider, 3b. 

McLaughlin, ib. 

Wise, rf. 

Ulrich, ss. 

Zug, If. 
I o 2 I I 2 I — 8 



Musselmanites 
Engle, 3b. 
Reber, p. 
Rose, 2b. 
Meyer, ss. 
Bard, c. 

Falkenstein, ib. 
Miller, cf. 
Becker, rf. 
Hertzler, If. 
Musselmanites . 
Reberites 33330 1 2—15 

Runs scored: Sheetz i, Musselman 2 
Herr i, Royer i, McLaughlin i, Wise 
r, Ulrich i, Engle 4, Reber 5, Bard 2, 



Becker 2, Hertzler 2. Two-base hits — 
Herr, Reber3, Meyer, Bard. 

On Thursday afternoon, June 11, the 
.Alumni and the College played an 
interesting game, even though the 
score was high. 

The following is the line-up and 
result.s: 

COLLEGE 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Engle, lb 2 2 11 o o 

Brandt, 3b 2 o 3 4 i 

Geyer, c. [ 5 3 60 I 

Bard, 2b 4 3 5 i i 

Musselman, p.. cf 2 o o o i 

Hershey. cf., p o i 2 4 i 

Wise, If 3 I o o o 

Royer, rf 2 i o o o 

Kreider, ss i 2 o i 2 



Total 21 13 22 ID 9 

Rose, 2b I 3 I I o 

Reber, cf., rf o i i o o 

Herr, Ira, ss., c 4 2 3 i 2 

Grofif, 3b 3 3 2 I I 

Nefif, c. ss 2 o 5 2 I 

Falkenstein, ib 3 i 9 o i 

Foreman, rf., cf 3 i 2 o i 

Herr, J. Z., If., p 3 o i 4 o 

Smith, p., If 3 2 2 I 2 

Schlosser, cf o i i o o 



Total 22 14 27 10 8 

College 402 I I 92 I I— 21 

.-\lumni 65310105 1 — 22 

Home Runs — Geyer, Grofif. 




The alumni held its annual luncheon 
'on the e\-enin,<;- of June lo. A splen- 
did menu was served anS the execu- 
tive committee deserves to be con- 
gratulated. Immediately after the 
luncheon a short business session was 
held, during- which many matters of 
minor importance were discussed. The 
association decided to give fifty dollars 
out of its general treasury towards 
the alumni endowment fund. 

At present there is sufficient money 
in this fund to help several students 
through school for the coming year. 
No application for pecuniary aid has 
yet been made to the committee in 
charge of the fund. They will be 
very glad if you can put them in com- 
munication with someone who is inter- 
ested in such a project. 

The following officers were elected 
for the coming year : 

President — Jacob Z. Herr. 



First Vice Pres.— W. F. Eshelman. 

Sesond Vice Pres.— C. J. Rose. 

Recording Secretary — Linda Huber. 

Corresponding ] Sec. — Ruth .Landis. 

Treasurer — A. L. Reber. 

Executive Committee: C. M. Neff, 
C. J. Rose, Gertrude Miller. 

The public program which followed 
the business session was entertaining 
and instructive. The order of exer- 
cises was as follows: 
Music Chorus. 

Prayer, B. F. Waltz, 'lo. 

Address of Welcome— James Breiti- 

gan, '05. 
Recitation — Florence Miller, 'lo. 
Music Ladies' Quartet. 

Alumni Statistics — Mrs. W. E. Glas- 

mire, '07. 
Oration E. G. Diehm, '10. 

Music Ladies' Quartet. 

Address A. G. Hottcnstein, '08. 

Music Chorus. 




And what is so rare as a day in June? 

Then, if ever, come perfect days ; 
Then, Heaven tries the earth if it he in 
tune, 

And over it softly her warm ear lays; 
Whether we look, or whether we listen 

We hear life murmur, or see it 
glisten. 

We gratefully acknowledge the fol- 
lowing May issues: Oak Leaves, The 
Tech Tatler, The Spice, High School 
Impressions, Linden Hall Echo, The 
Palmerian, Daleville Leader, The 
Purple and Gold, The Mirror, Hebron 
Star, The Carlisle Arrow, The Sun- 
burian High, The Collegian, The Sus- 
quehanna, College Rays, The Dynamo, 
The Ursinus Weekly, The Lafayette. 

We look back to the collegiate year 
of 1913 — 1914 with many fond recol- 
lections, and feel that commencement 
week has come too soon. We feel as 
though we were stepping into a new 
boat as we launch out on the sea of 
life. Some May be able to stay almost 



entirely on the surface, others may be 
moving through life with merely their 
heads projecting above the level. To 
whatever class each one may belong, 
let us remember that, unless we are 
willing to struggle continually, we 
soon will sink to the bottom. 

Just a word to our exchanges. In 
looking over the different papers we 
find that practically all of them had 
a good beginning and gradually grew 
better. Who shall have the credit for 
all these changes? We hope that the 
exchange editors will agree when we 
say that some of the credit rightly be- 
longs to each exchange editor. The 
editor of Our College Times Ex- 
changes wishes to thank each editor 
for his criticisms. We took the bitter 
with the sweet and tried to profit there- 
by. We furthermore send our best 
wishes to all the various exchanges and 
hope to be able to have your school 
paper as one of our exchange num- 
bers for the year 1914— 15. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



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CONDUCTED ON SANITARY PRIN- 
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Try Mother's Bread — Home-Made. 
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FRAMING NEATLY EXECUTED 
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Kodaks and Supplies Athletic Goods 

Kodaks and supplies of all kinds al- 
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Exclusive agency for Hopewell Choc- 
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School Supplies. Cutlery 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



G.Win.REISNER 

Manufacturing 
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College Jewelry of the Better Sort. 
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1913 



IT PAYS TO EDUCATE 

Invest a few years of your life in securing an Educa- 
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For further particulars, address 



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ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Mention Our College Times When Writing. 



29 



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sale. JOHN C. BERBERIAN 

East High St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

URSINUS COLLEGE, Collegevllie, Pa. 

(24 miles from Philadelphia) 
Group system of instruction. University 
trained faculty. High standards of scholar- 
ship. Athletics encouraged but controlled. 
No fraternites or exclusive clubs. Strong 
Christian influences. New dormitories and 
dining halls. Men and women admitted to 
all courses. 

SUMMER SESSION 
Oldest and most inviting college summer 
school in Pennsylvania. College courses 
and preparatory studies. Teaching by heads 
of departments. Large shaded campus and 
cool buildings. Terms low. 
GEORGE LESLIE OMWAKE, Pd.D., Pres. 

ELIZABETHTOWN DEKTAL PARLORS 

Office Closed Thursday 

and Friday. 

S. J. HEINDEL, DENTIST 



We furnish everything in 
Athletic Supplies, Gymnasium Goods, Pen- 
nants and Monograms at the lowest prices. 

STEHMAN BROS. 

Y. M. C. A. BIdg., LANCASTER, PA. 



IH. H. BRANDT i 



1 ALL KINDS BUILDING MATERIAL 1 
I ■ 

I SLATE and ROOFING PAPER | 

I I 

i ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'A a 

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Our Advertisers are Worthy of your Patronage. 

We ELIZABEThTOWN HERALD 



' $1.00 A YEAR 
Estimates on any kind of Job Printing. 



Linotyping for the Trade. 



4.. | .. I .. M . 4 ,. | ,. H ..|.. | .i l . H .. I .. I i. I .. H ..|..|.i|nM " l "H"| i** 

;J. N. OLWEILER^ 

CLOTHIER AND 
HABERDASHER 



Agent tor Lebanon Steam Laundry. , 
Shipped every Wednesday. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PENN'A ; 



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DENTIST 

GEO. K. KERSEY 
Call to make appointments 
East High St., Near Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. W. CAIN 

store Adjoining Federal Room 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PENN'A 

JOHN A. FISHER 

BARBER 

Centre Square, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

lOS. H. RIDER & SON 

AGENCY FOR 

SPALDING'S 

I 

I Baseballi Tennis Goods 



Ttie place to buy 
Stationery, Pennants, Souvenir Goods, Post 
Cards, and hundreds of articles for your 
pleasure and convenience. Our candies are 
always fresh. LAWRY'S VARIETY STORE, 
Half Block S. of Center Sq., Elizabethtown. 

Boggs Hardware Store 

The best there is in hardware at the 
lowest possible prices. Prompt and cour- 
teous service. TRY US. 

D. B. KLENE 

CHOICE GROCERIES 

AND PROVISIONS 
West High Street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



CEO. A. FISHER ♦ 

Hardware | 

Phonographs | 

And J 

Records | 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. X 



ELIZABETHTOWN % 

ROLLER MILLS 

J. F. BINKLEY, Propr. 

Manufacturer of Best Grades o( 

FLOUR AMD FEED 

I i Highest Cash Prices paid for grain, 
bay and straw 
I KUZABETHTOWN, - PENNA. 



Mention Our College Times Wlicr Writing. 



w::»:!iiia::iiiB^;i<H:iiiiB:ii;H:i!!:a;'iiii 



The Book Store 



BOOKS, BIBLES, SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 

G. N. FALKENSTEIN, Elizabethtown. Pa. 

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Seven thousand people buy WALK- 
OVER shoes every day — certainly 
there must be much merit in a shoe 
to attain such popularity — 
In addition to the better quality or 
our shoes we offer our better man- 
ner of serving you. 

WALK-OVEr! I 

SHOE GTORE |l 

HUNTZBERGER-WINTERS CO. I 

Department Store % 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PENN'A | 



MIESSE'S ICE CREAM 

adds ZEST to the MEAL 

Sold in Elizabethtown by 

J. S. GROSS. 



IPaintino anb paper 

Ibanoing 

AMOS B. DRACE 



I Spalding Sporting Goods 



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Jerseys, Sweaters, Football, Tennis, 
Golf, Gymnasium Outfits, Athletic 
Shoes. Kodaks and Cameras, de- 
veloping and finishing. 

H . B . H E R R 
30-32 West King Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 



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Est. 1884 - Est. 1884 

KIRK JOHNSON CS, CO. 

Pianos, Player-Pianos, Victrolas, Sheet Music, Musical Mdse. 
16-18 W. King Street. LANCASTER, PA. 



Our Advertisers are Worthy of Your Patronage. 



Elizabethtown Exchange 
Bank 



Transacts a general banking business. 

Pays interest on time deposits. 

Solicits your patronage. 

OFFICERS 

A. G. HEISEY, President. ALLEN A. COBLE, Vice. Free. 

J. H. ESHLEMAN, Cashier. 



A. 
Al 


G 

len 


Heisey 
A. Coble 


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Jos 
Dr. 


D 

G 
H. 


RECTORS 

Heisey 
K. Blough 






J. H. Buch 

Dr. A. M. Kalbach 


H 


J. 


Glsh 






Henry E. Landls 






Geo. 


D. Boggs 










E. 


E. Hemley 






B. 


H. 


Greider 





TAKE YOUR 

Laundry to Fisher's 

Leaves every Tuesday and Thursday morn- 
ing. Returns Wednesday & Friday afternoon 

Ind. 'Phone. Bell 'Phone 

CONN & SLOTE 

Book and Job Printing 
Catalogues a Specialty 



311 W. Grant St., 



LANCASTER, PA. 




O. N. HEISEY 
Provisions, Groceries and Choice Candies 



HEISEY BUILDING 

mrnmamgrnamummi 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



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